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Rockefeller celebrates inaugural DEI awards

Four community members—Sadye Paez, Elizabeth Campbell, Yuriria Vázquez, and Chad Morton—were recognized for their advocacy work both within the university and in the wider scientific community.

New genetic tool could identify drug targets for diseases associated with metabolic dysfunction

A novel platform for identifying metabolic gene functions has already revealed interactions between proteins and metabolites that are fundamental to cell metabolism.

Asexual reproduction usually leads to a lack of genetic diversity. Not for these ants.

Parthenogenic species must compensate for their limited gene pool or risk extinction.

Campus-wide celebration marks President Emeritus Torsten N. Wiesel’s 100th Birthday

President Lifton hosted a community celebration of Wiesel, a Nobel laureate as well as former university president.

Researchers capture never-before-seen view of gene transcription

New tech reveals findings that address long-standing theories about how bacteria begin the process of making RNA from DNA.

Elizabeth Campbell launches Laboratory of Molecular Pathogenesis

The infectious disease specialist will continue her groundbreaking work on the transcriptomes of the pathogens behind tuberculosis and Covid.

Leslie B. Vosshall honored with the Dickson Prize in Medicine

Vosshall is recognized for her pioneering studies of the mosquito Aedes aegypti, which transmits pathogens causing human diseases including dengue, Zika, chikungunya, and yellow fever.

Light-weight microscope captures large-scale brain activity of mice on the move

With a new microscope that's as light as a penny, researchers can now observe broad swaths of the brain in action as mice move about and interact with their environments.

Surprising origins for a rare cancer

An unexpected discovery may pave the way to better treatments for a broad range of cancers.

What we need to worry about with avian flu—and what we don’t 

Since first detected in birds in 2021, avian flu has killed millions of poultry and infected animals once thought to be immune. What early warning signs could point to an increasing risk for humans?

Winrich Freiwald wins the 2024 Kavli Prize for Neuroscience

The researcher is being honored for his discovery of a specialized system in the brain’s neocortex that is responsible for recognizing faces.

38 students receive Ph.D.s at Rockefeller’s 66th convocation

Nobel laureate Frances H. Arnold, STEM advocate Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, and climatologist Michael E. Mann also received honorary degrees.

Key mechanism for maintaining proper telomere length identified 

New findings describe how the enzyme CST is recruited to the end of the telomere, where it maintains telomere length with the help of subtle chemical changes made to the protein POT1.

Heilbrunn Nurse Scholar Award Celebrates 10 Years

The program supports research on nursing within the context of clinical and translational science.

AI could accelerate drug discovery. But only if we can trust it.

The advent of AlphaFold3 could be an unprecedented boon for drug development. Computational biologist Jiankun Lyu discusses the pros and cons of the tech, and his work analyzing the algorithm.

How memories crystallize over time

“Practice makes perfect” is no mere cliché. It's neuroscience.

Researchers may have found an Achilles heel for hepatitis B

New understanding of how the virus replicates could lead to new therapeutic targets for HBV.

Cori Bargmann receives Gruber Neuroscience Prize

Bargmann is recognized for her role in linking genetics with behavior.

Paul Bieniasz elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Bieniasz is being honored for his work on the life cycle of retroviruses and their interactions with host proteins. With his election, nearly half of Rockefeller faculty are NAS members.

Rockefeller joins city partnership to reduce carbon footprint

As part of the Plant-Powered Carbon Challenge, the university will offer more plant-based dining options on campus.

Newly discovered brain pathway sheds light on addiction

The findings in mice may explain how addictive drugs hijack natural reward processing systems, creating the urge to use while throwing natural urges to eat and drink off-kilter.

Svetlana Mojsov named one of TIME100 Most Influential People of 2024

The annual list honors artists, innovators, leaders, and pioneers in a variety of fields.

Rockefeller holds annual Employee Anniversary Celebration

The university celebrated staff and faculty who retired or reached notable work anniversaries in 2023.

Why some people with rheumatoid arthritis have pain without inflammation

Researchers have identified a suite of genes explaining the disconnect between diagnosis and symptom.

New technique sheds light on memory and learning

The findings may also have implications for learning and memory disorders, including Fragile X syndrome.

How one scientist's fascination with RNA changed medicine forever

Thomas Tuschl has devoted his career to making discoveries that bridge the gap between bench and business—and have resulted in entirely new classes of drugs.

Stem cell model offers first glimpse of early human development

The new platform’s ethically grounded approach promises to reveal much about how human embryos form during the earliest stages of pregnancy.

Theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli receives 2024 Lewis Thomas Prize

The author of There Are Places in the World Where Rules Are Less Important Than Kindness was presented with Rockefeller’s prestigious science writing award on April 9.

The SNF Institute for Global Infectious Disease Research announces new advisory board

SNFiRU, which aims to better understand the agents that cause infectious disease and to lower barriers to treatment and prevention globally, launched numerous initiatives in its inaugural year.

New Mtb study offers a novel paradigm for understanding bacterial transcription

A novel sequencing technique reveals a genetic trick TB may be using to evade the immune system and resist antibiotics.

A pioneering way to target the culprit behind a deadly liver cancer

Researchers have translated a cutting-edge tactic for treating genetic disorders into a fresh approach for potentially stymying cancer.  

Vitamin A may play a central role in stem cell biology and wound repair

Retinoic acid, the active state of Vitamin A, appears to regulate how stem cells enter and exit a transient state central to their role in wound repair.

New study on mating behaviors offers clues into the evolution of attraction

In examining the mating rituals of roundworms, researchers uncovered a unique approach to reproduction that maximizes genetic fitness.

Universal tool for tracking cell-to-cell interactions

uLIPSTIC, an updated method for directly observing physical interactions between cells, could allow scientists to one day map every possible cell interaction.

Innovative microscopy tech answers fundamental questions

A powerful tool captures data from an unprecedented 1 million neurons simultaneously, painting a much fuller picture of brain dynamics.

Rogue enzymes cause numerous diseases. A new method could help design drugs to treat them.

A novel platform allows researchers to directly target enzymes implicated in infectious diseases, several genetic disorders, and some cancers for the first time.

David J. Lyons, former vice president for business and finance, has passed away

Known for his dedication, keen financial sense, and community spirit, Lyons served the university for decades.

Karl Palmquist wins 2024 Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Palmquist receives the honor for developing innovative methods to study mechanical forces and emergent phenomena in early organ development.

Svetlana Mojsov named 2024 recipient of the Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Mojsov's research into hormonal triggers for insulin production led to groundbreaking treatments for diabetes and obesity. She will be presented with the award on April 17.

Double trouble at chromosome ends

The end replication problem dictates that telomeres shrink unless telomerase intervenes. But the problem is actually twice as complicated, with telomerase providing only part of the solution.

Cutting-edge methods yield surprising insights into Huntington’s disease

New findings add depth to our understanding of neurodegeneration.

Keeping telomerase in check

Telomerase could run amok, deleteriously capping damaged DNA, were it not for a first responder to DNA damage.

Luciano Marraffini wins Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science

Marraffini is honored for his pioneering research on the study of CRISPR-Cas systems.

How fruit flies control the brain's "steering wheel"

A newly discovered neural circuit mediates between navigational brain cells, acting as a sort of mental steering wheel. 

Newly discovered genetic malfunction causes rare lung disease

The absence of a single immune cell receptor has been linked to both fewer defenses against mycobacterial infections, such as TB, and damaging buildup of sticky residue in the lungs.  

"Exhausted" immune cells may drive Alzheimer's

A class of ineffective immune cells may be driving Alzheimer’s disease, a finding that could both explain why APOE4 gene increases the risk of the disease and why a new drug can impact it.

Revealing how an ancient genetic invader inhabits our DNA

LINE-1 is associated with disease and aging. The Rout lab has uncloaked the core of its key protein, pointing the way towards therapeutic targets.

Yvena Bouillon, the assistant director of e-procurement and inventory control, has died

She was known by her colleagues for both her committed professionalism and her generous spirit.

A CRISPR pioneer looks back as the first gene-editing therapy is approved

Luciano Marraffini’s research helped lay the groundwork for the newly FDA-approved CRISPR-based therapy for sickle cell anemia. He reflects on how we got here—and where the science is going next.

Innovative method identifies rare brain cell types for the first time

It also reduces the cost of a million single-cell transcriptomes from $10,000 to $700—and the time necessary down to about a day.

A new way of thinking about how organ architecture develops 

By focusing on the emergent features of cell collectives, instead of individual cells, scientists forge a new path for understanding how organs develop their architecture.   

Intriguing science discoveries of 2023

From plumbing the depths of wound repair to tackling how songbirds solve problems, here are some fascinating discoveries that came out of Rockefeller in 2023.

Rockefeller launches startup incubator

Carlo Yuvienco, the inaugural director of the university’s new Ford Center Incubator, on how the new space will help translate research breakthroughs into market-ready biomedical innovations.

Her scientific breakthrough took 5 years. Getting credit took decades.

Mojsov’s research directly led to blockbuster drugs like Ozempic and Wegovy. She talks about the long quest for proper credit and lessons that can be learned from her experience.

How bacteria recognize viral invasion and activate immune defenses

Bacteria have an array of strategies to counter viral invasion, but how they first spot a stranger in their midst has long been a mystery.

How the antioxidant glutathione keeps mitochondria healthy

“I believe this is going to be a very fruitful find. Every time people have studied nutrient sensing, we’ve learned a lot about biology, and many drugs have been developed as a result.”

New blood test could offer earlier detection of common deadly cancers

The low-cost multi-cancer detector can pick up the presence of a telltale protein in a tiny amount of blood in less than two hours.

The bacteria that may trigger multiple sclerosis

New research suggests that the long sought-after environmental trigger for MS is a toxin produced by certain C. perfringens bacteria.

Toward a universal dengue vaccine

Why do our bodies not only fail to learn from prior dengue infection but also become more vulnerable to it as a result? New research pinpoints a subgroup of antibodies that may be to blame.

The Rockefeller University joins with leading New York City-area institutions to launch new Chan Zuckerberg research hub

The new research hub will engineer immune cells for early disease prevention, detection, and treatment.
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