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How cells feel their way 

A single cell has no nerves, yet it can feel and respond to mechanical forces such as pressure. Armed with new technologies, scientists are making headway in understanding how this sensory system operates.

Stem cell memories may drive wound repair—and chronic disease

Epidermal stem cells that hail from the hair follicle retain memories of their journey to the skin's surface. Those memories are a boon for wound repair, but may also contribute to chronic diseases and cancer.

New design may boost potency of monoclonal antibodies against COVID

In animal experiments, the structurally altered antibodies activated the immune system more effectively than those currently used in the clinic. They also proved to be more protective against the virus.

A new interdisciplinary center, devoted to the neuroscience of social behavior, has been launched with a $25 million gift

A major gift from Michael and Vikki Price marks the launch of an integrated effort to map and analyze the biological underpinnings of sociality and in turn better understand related disorders such as autism, depression, and schizophrenia.

Radiotherapy may explain why childhood cancer survivors often develop metabolic disease

Radiation therapy to treat childhood cancer may damage adipose tissue, causing diabetes and coronary heart disease decades later.

Scientists discover how mitochondria import antioxidants

The finding offers researchers a direct way to investigate oxidative stress and its damaging effects in aging, cancer and other diseases.

How mice miss the exit 

Thanks to the existence of forgetful mice, scientists have gained clues into the process by which the brain forms short-term memories. They were even able to restore a mouse’s memory by genetic manipulation.

How foodborne diseases protect the gut's nervous system

Prior infections appear to shield enteric neurons, preventing these key components of the body's "second brain" from dying off when future pathogens strike.

Dopamine’s many roles, explained

Studying fruit flies, researchers ask how a single brain chemical can orchestrate diverse functions such as learning, motivation and movement.

Heavy rainfall from Hurricane Ida tests flood control measures installed in 2012

The September storm brought record rainfall which quickly overwhelmed drainage systems on campus and throughout the city. But the event did not cause widespread damage on campus thanks to improvements made nine years ago.

Recent Awards and Honors

Cori Bargmann

Cori Bargmann honored with Salk Institute Medal for Research Excellence

November 12, 2021

Bargmann receives the award for her work studying how genes interact in the nervous system to encode behavior.

Jean-Laurent Casanova

Jean-Laurent Casanova receives Abarca Prize

October 27, 2021

Casanova is recognized for investigating how human genes determine the clinical manifestations and outcome of primary infections.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

NPR

The vaccines will likely be less effective against this variant, he predicts. But Paul Bieniasz's research so far also suggests that people can boost their protection — against any variant — by having three exposures to the virus. So that means either three doses of the vaccine or two doses after a natural infection.

CNN

Rockefeller's Elizabeth Campbell explains that Merck's antiviral drug works by wreaking havoc with the way the Covid-19 virus makes copies of itself. She cautions that the potential off-target effects will require further investigation.

The Scientist

In mice, a kind of immune memory appears to protect the cells against future harm, a finding from Daniel Mucida that could provide insight into treatments for irritable bowel syndrome and other inflammatory digestive conditions.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how the brain’s internal states drive its remarkable ability to reach different conclusion based on the same information. Also: The latest from Rockefeller’s COVID labs, and much more.


From this issue

 


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