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Bacterial art, sheep brains, and a fish race: highlights from our Science Saturday festival

The annual event invites children to campus for an unforgettable day of hands-on experiments and interactive learning.

30 young scientists receive Ph.D.s at Rockefeller’s 60th convocation

Since its first convocation, Rockefeller has granted doctor of philosophy degrees in bioscience to more than 12,600 students, including today’s graduates.

Troves from a search for new biomarkers: blood-borne RNA

Scientists have found a new way to trawl blood samples for snippets of RNA released by tumors or diseased organs. The method might eventually help doctors diagnose and track a wide range of medical conditions.

William E. Ford elected Chair of The Rockefeller University Board

Ford succeeds Russell L. Carson, who is retiring after leading the Board for the past 13 years.

Rockefeller tops global university ranking in measures of research excellence and patents

The university ranks first in two major categories in a survey of more than 1600 institutions.

Drowsy worms offer new insights into the neuroscience of sleep

Scientists studying worms have discovered a group of cells that help the body transition from wakefulness to slumber.

A. James Hudspeth to receive Kavli Prize in Neuroscience

Hudspeth is receiving the honor for pioneering work on the molecular and neural mechanisms of hearing.

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Genetic mutation identified as culprit in rare infectious disease

Researchers have uncovered the genetic factors that make some people susceptible to Whipple's disease, an intestinal inflammatory disorder that causes diarrhea, pain, and weight loss.

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New molecular views of how neurons pace their signals

Communication between cells is a carefully coordinated matter. In the brain, for example, neurons talk by firing signals at a particular tempo, each impulse subsiding before the next arises. Their pacing relies on the activity of SK channels, molecules embedded in neurons’ outer membranes. Towa...

A first look at the earliest decisions that shape a human embryo

For the first time, scientists have shown that a small cluster of cells in the human embryo dictates the fate of other embryonic cells. The discovery of this developmental “organizer” could advance research into many human diseases, and it suggests we have more in common with birds than meets the eye.

Recent Awards and Honors

Distinguished Teaching Award Plaque

Seth A. Darst and Michael P. Rout receive Distinguished Teaching Awards

June 14, 2018

Darst and Rout were honored at the 2018 Convocation luncheon for their dedication to training Rockefeller graduate students. Together, they teach a course in biochemistry and biophysics methods.

Gregory M. Alushin

Gregory M. Alushin honored as a 2018 Pew Scholar

June 14, 2018

Alushin has been named a biomedical science scholar for his investigation of how cells sense and respond to mechanical force.

Rockefeller in the News

Scientific American

As [A. James] Hudspeth explored the neural mechanisms of hearing over the years, he developed a special appreciation for the intricate anatomy of the inner ear—an appreciation that transcends the laboratory. “I think we as scientists tend to underemphasize the aesthetic aspect of science,” he says.

Science

"'It is mind-blowing' that cells from such evolutionarily distant species can share these developmental instructions, says Ali Brivanlou, a stem cell biologist at The Rockefeller University in New York City and a senior author on the new study. The organizer 'has been conserved evolutionarily over hundreds of millions of years, so not seeing it would have been a surprise,' he says. But, 'There is something really emotional about looking that far back at human origin.'"

NIH Director's Blog

"[Michael] Rout and [Brian] Chait have spent more than 20 years trying to solve the structure of NPCs. Not only are NPCs large and constantly engaged in shuttling molecules in and out, they also represent moving machines."

 

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Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.