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Toward the first drug to treat a rare, lethal liver cancer

After scouring more than 5,000 compounds, scientists have identified several new classes of therapeutics that may help treat fibrolamellar carcinoma.

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A missing antibody molecule may indicate when dengue will become deadly

The antibody's altered structure helps explain an enduring mystery of dengue—why only a fraction of those infected will develop severe disease.

How CRISPR promotes antibiotic resistance in bacteria

Whenever a cell uses CRISPR to defend itself, there's a chance of mutations creeping into its genetic code. Some of these mutations are harmless; others kill the cell. But fortuitous mutations can occasionally render major human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, antibiotic resistant.

Rockefeller leads an international ranking of research impact

According to this year’s CWTS Leiden Ranking of over 1200 universities from 69 countries, Rockefeller has the highest proportion of frequently cited scientific publications.

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Vaccines charge up natural immunity against SARS-CoV-2

Vaccination enhances antibodies in people who have had COVID, likely giving them protection even from the new variants.

New findings to boost IVF success rates

New research casts doubt on a genetic test used to screen would-be embryos for IVF implantation. The findings suggests that these embryos can develop into healthy babies regardless of whether or not they’ve been flagged as defective by the test.

Scientists release error-free genomes of 25 animals—with another 70,000 coming up

Scientists have launched an ambitious effort to produce high-quality reference genomes for all vertebrate species, from mammals to birds and reptiles. The result could be discoveries with implications for animal conservation as well as human health and disease.

A case for simplifying gene nomenclature across different organisms

Scientists call it oxytocin in humans, isotocin in fish, mesotocin in birds, and valitocin in sharks. But according to a new study, it’s all the same hormone—and high time we settled on just one name.


New Caspary exhibit honors 58 Rockefeller award winners, past and present

Redesigning the exhibit provided an opportunity to consider how to best honor and commemorate Rockefeller award winners. Discussions with university leadership and an ad-hoc faculty committee steered the process and led to a broadening of the criteria for inclusion.

Evolutionary biologist and ornithologist Richard Prum receives the 2021 Lewis Thomas Prize

The author of The Evolution of Beauty was presented with Rockefeller’s science writing award, which honors scientists as inspirational authors.

Recent Awards and Honors

Josefina del Mármol and Shiri Gur-Cohen receive Tri-Institutional Breakout Awards

June 3, 2021

del Mármol, from Vanessa Ruta’s lab, and Gur-Cohen, from Elaine Fuchs’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work.

Katya Vinogradova

Ekaterina V. Vinogradova named a Searle Scholar

May 20, 2021

Vinogradova receives the honor for her work designing chemical probes to dissect and alter immune protein function.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

“People who were infected and get vaccinated really have a terrific response, a terrific set of antibodies, because they continue to evolve their antibodies,” Dr. Nussenzweig said. “I expect that they will last for a long time.”

STAT News

“Depending potentially on the vaccination protocol, the vaccines are good enough to deal” with B.1.351 and other variants, said virologist Theodora Hatziioannou of Rockefeller University, an author of the study. “At least,” she added, “the variants we’ve seen up to now.” 

NPR

"People thought these genes were missing in birds and platypus, right? But they weren't missing. They just weren't sequenced with the older technologies," says Erich Jarvis.  

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes us inside the response to the pandemic, where scientists are using every tool in the 21st century playbook to transform COVID-19 into a manageable disease. Also: Mosquito menace, The brain inside your gut, and Addiction then and now.


From this issue

 


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