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A third vaccine dose may increase protection from Omicron

The booster appears to galvanize memory B cells into producing potent and versatile antibodies that neutralize both the original virus and its many variants.

Rockefeller tops international university ranking in measure of top cited publications

In the U-Multirank rating system for higher education institutions, Rockefeller placed first in a measure of impact based on citations.

40 young scientists receive Ph.D.s at Rockefeller’s 64th convocation

With this week’s ceremony, the first in-person convocation since the start of the pandemic, Rockefeller has granted doctor of philosophy degrees in bioscience to 1,395 students. In addition, Anthony S. Fauci, Katalin Karikó, and Lulu C. Wang received honorary doctor of science degrees.

How intricate patterns arise in developing tissues

In developing bird skin, immature cells move around and form intricate patterns. Scientists are zeroing in on the mechanical forces guiding the process.

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Building a human ‘pangenome’ to capture global genomic diversity

The human reference genome, the most widely used resource in human genetics, is getting a major update.

Hundreds of new drug targets to combat tuberculosis

The study highlights genes that, when silenced, render Mycobacterium tuberculosis vulnerable to antibiotics, and identifies existing drugs that may be effective against one prominent strain.

One protein's surprising partnership with single-stranded DNA

Linker histone H1 appears capable of distinguishing between single-stranded and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that its role in maintaining our genomes extends far beyond that of keeping chromosomes compact.

A synthetic antibiotic may help turn the tide against drug-resistant bacteria

The compound attacks MRSA, C. diff, and several other deadly pathogens. Its discovery demonstrates the power of combining computational biology, genetic sequencing, and synthetic chemistry to study bacterial evolution.

The genetic underpinnings of severe staph infections

A mutated gene may explain why some Staphylococcus aureus infections turn lethal, a finding with significant implications for people living with 5p- syndrome.

Titia de Lange elected to the Royal Society

She receives the honor for elucidating mechanisms of telomere protection and genome maintenance.

Recent Awards and Honors

Tomasz Ahrends and Kevin Gonzales receive Tri-Institutional Breakout Awards

June 2, 2022

Tomasz Ahrends, from Daniel Mucida’s lab, and Kevin Gonzales, from Elaine Fuchs’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work.

Leslie B. Vosshall

Leslie B. Vosshall named a member of the American Philosophical Society

June 1, 2022

Vosshall is honored for her investigation of how sensory stimuli are perceived and processed.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Washington Post

“What we are looking for is potentially very rare genetic variants with a very big impact on the individual,” said András Spaan, a clinical microbiologist and fellow at the Rockefeller University in New York who is spearheading a search for genetic material responsible for coronavirus resistance.    

Science News

Michel Nussenzweig and colleagues examined what happens to the immune response after a third dose of vaccine, focusing especially on very long-lived immune cells called memory B cells. Those memory cells still made new antibodies when they got a third look at the vaccine.

Nature

Erich Jarvis says he wants the Human Pangenome Project to achieve a better representation of human genetic diversity. “I’m a person of colour. I grew up as an African American. I grew up as an under-represented minority in the sciences,” he says. “My diversity is not represented. So I have a personal motivation and a societal one to make sure that this pangenome really represents populations.”      

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue explores how stem cells help our bodies form, develop, and heal—and how they’re powering a new surge in science. Also: Do flies ever get lonely? And much more.


From this issue

 


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