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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

IT upgrades bolster university’s defenses against cybercriminals

Rockefeller’s Information Security team has implemented one of the most substantial upgrades in its history. As backend protections are strengthened, community members also have a critical role to play.

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New comprehensive map of the portal to the cell’s nucleus

The findings, which may have implications for a wide range of human diseases, suggest that nuclear pore complexes vary in structure and function even within a single nucleus.

A novel compound might defeat multidrug-resistant bacteria common in hospitals

Increasingly, hospitalized patients contract infections that evade current antibiotics including colistin, long used as a last treatment option. The discovery of a new colistin variant might make it possible to outmaneuver these pathogens.

Ashton Murray is named chief diversity officer

Murray will become Rockefeller’s inaugural chief diversity officer and vice president for diversity, equity, and inclusion on January 10.

Waddling water bears, grandmother neurons, and other memorable science stories of 2021

This year's scientific endeavors included multiple attacks on SARS-CoV-2—and a lot more. Here are the most memorable science stories to come out of Rockefeller labs in 2021, from the benefits of brown fat to the pitfalls of modern IVF screening techniques.

Sid Strickland will step down from role of dean of graduate and postdoctoral studies

After 21 years, Sidney Strickland will exit his administrative role, returning full time to his laboratory research at Rockefeller.

New evidence that boosters may be crucial in protecting against Omicron

Researchers found that the antibodies present in people who have had COVID or taken two doses of mRNA vaccine are inadequate against Omicron. But their protective ability increases significantly after a booster dose.

How a fly's brain calculates its position in space

New research reveals how neurons in a fly's brain signal the direction in which the body is traveling. The cells appear to literally perform vector math in order to act as a biological compass.

Llama antibodies could help fight SARS-CoV-2 variants

Scientists have identified hundreds of llama-derived antibodies that potentially could be developed into a COVID treatment. They hope such a drug would be potent against different variants of the coronavirus, including Omicron.

How cells feel their way 

A single cell has no nerves, yet it can feel and respond to mechanical forces such as pressure. Armed with new technologies, scientists are making headway in understanding how this sensory system operates.

Recent Awards and Honors

Katya Vinogradova

Ekaterina V. Vinogradova receives Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award

January 11, 2022

Vinogradova receives the award for her work exploring how lung tumors suppress immune responses.

Charles M. Rice

Charles M. Rice is elected to the National Academy of Inventors

December 7, 2021

Rice receives the honor for pioneering novel methods for growing and studying hepatitis C virus.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

STAT News

For his part, Paul Bieniasz is feeling more optimistic than he was earlier in the Omicron wave, but he’s not looking for a respite. He wants something more sustained. “I’m not so interested in breathers. These waves, I want to diminish the amplitude rather than the frequency,” he said.  

The New York Times

“People that are vaccinated really are doing very well in terms of hospitalization,” said Michel Nussenzweig, an immunologist at Rockefeller University in New York.

The New York Times

“What molnupiravir does is it disguises itself,” Elizabeth Campbell, an expert in structural biology at the Rockefeller University who studies coronavirus antivirals, said in an interview. “It can propagate errors that are going to be sprinkled all over the genome.”

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how the brain’s internal states drive its remarkable ability to reach different conclusion based on the same information. Also: The latest from Rockefeller’s COVID labs, and much more.


From this issue

 


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