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Cutting-edge methods yield surprising insights into Huntington’s disease

New findings add depth to our understanding of neurodegeneration.

Keeping telomerase in check

Telomerase could run amok, deleteriously capping damaged DNA, were it not for a first responder to DNA damage.

Luciano Marraffini wins Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science

Marraffini is honored for his pioneering research on the study of CRISPR-Cas systems.

How fruit flies control the brain's "steering wheel"

A newly discovered neural circuit mediates between navigational brain cells, acting as a sort of mental steering wheel. 

Newly discovered genetic malfunction causes rare lung disease

The absence of a single immune cell receptor has been linked to both fewer defenses against mycobacterial infections, such as TB, and damaging buildup of sticky residue in the lungs.  

"Exhausted" immune cells may drive Alzheimer's

A class of ineffective immune cells may be driving Alzheimer’s disease, a finding that could both explain why APOE4 gene increases the risk of the disease and why a new drug can impact it.

Revealing how an ancient genetic invader inhabits our DNA

LINE-1 is associated with disease and aging. The Rout lab has uncloaked the core of its key protein, pointing the way towards therapeutic targets.

Yvena Bouillon, the assistant director of e-procurement and inventory control, has died

She was known by her colleagues for both her committed professionalism and her generous spirit.

A CRISPR pioneer looks back as the first gene-editing therapy is approved

Luciano Marraffini’s research helped lay the groundwork for the newly FDA-approved CRISPR-based therapy for sickle cell anemia. He reflects on how we got here—and where the science is going next.

Innovative method identifies rare brain cell types for the first time

It also reduces the cost of a million single-cell transcriptomes from $10,000 to $700—and the time necessary down to about a day.
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