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Three Rockefeller researchers are elected to the National Academy of Medicine

Mary E. Hatten, Charles M. Rice, and Leslie B. Vosshall are three of 100 new members elected to the academy today.

Noninfectious versions of SARS-CoV-2 provide powerful research tools

The new experimental system will facilitate efforts to study different coronavirus variants and develop new drugs for COVID. 

A mission to end metastasis 

Not all cancer cells are killers. One lab is focusing its energy on only those that enable tumors to spread—and it may have found their kryptonite.

Small molecule may prevent metastasis in colorectal cancer

The compound works by hindering a key pathway that cancer cells rely upon to hoard energy, and is already undergoing clinical trials.


Study detects origins of Huntington's disease in two-week-old human embryos

The findings shed new light on the root causes of this disease, which leads to the degeneration of neurons in midlife.

Seth A. Darst honored with Gregori Aminoff Prize

Darst receives the honor for pioneering research on RNA polymerase, the molecular machine that transcribes RNA from DNA. His work is leading to new knowledge about the transcription process, as well as to insights enabling development of urgent antibiotic and antiviral treatments.

Katalin Karikó named the 2022 recipient of the Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Katalin Karikó discovered how to keep synthetic RNA from activating the innate immune system, paving the way for RNA vaccines including two for SARS-CoV-2.

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Novel method for trapping HIV inside its host may give rise to new antivirals

Human cells can be coaxed into preventing certain enveloped viruses (including HIV, Ebola, and parainfluenza) from escaping their membranes in the lab, a finding that could lead to novel treatments for many viral diseases.

Linker histones tune the length and shape of chromosomes

A new study finds that proteins known as linker histones control the complex coiling process that determines whether DNA will wind into long and thin chromosomes, made up of many small loops, or short and thick chromosomes with fewer large loops.

Hospital hallway installation honors 11 women scientists at Rockefeller

Uncovering the chemical composition of histones and innovating addiction treatment are only two of the accomplishments of the women scientists featured in a new photographic display.

Recent Awards and Honors

Junyue Cao

Junyue Cao honored with NIH Director’s New Innovator Award

October 5, 2021

Cao receives this grant for work using single-cell genomic methods to enable developmental mapping of entire organisms. 

Luka Mesin

Luka Mesin named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalist

September 21, 2021

Mesin, from the Victora lab, is recognized for using novel techniques to better understand how B cells mature and evolve to create antibodies to fight off pathogens.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

Studies touting the durability and strength of natural immunity are hobbled by one crucial flaw. They are, by definition, assessing the responses only of people who survived Covid-19. The road to natural immunity is perilous and uncertain, Dr. Nussenzweig said.

Science Friday

Sofia Landi and Winrich Freiwald, two of the authors of the report, talk about the research, and what it may tell us about how the brain and memory are organized.

The Atlantic

Jean-Laurent Casanova believes that anyone who gets severely ill or dies from COVID is “immunodeficient” by definition—even if there is no current explanation for why they fared so poorly. Researchers say that continued advances in genetic sequencing will help unravel some of that mystery.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how the brain’s internal states drive its remarkable ability to reach different conclusion based on the same information. Also: The latest from Rockefeller’s COVID labs, and much more.


From this issue

 


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