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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
!
Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

Rockefeller faculty member, Leslie B. Vosshall, named vice president and chief scientific officer of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Vosshall will join the leadership team at HHMI, a major philanthropy that supports basic biomedical scientists and educators.

Pamela Björkman wins the 2021 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Pamela J. Björkman, who discovered key aspects of the immune system that are helping to direct better treatment for infection from viruses and other diseases, will receive the prize in a virtual ceremony hosted by Rockefeller on September 30.

Frames of Mind 

We think of brains as computers—stimulus in, action out. But they’re far more finicky than any iMac. Easily swayed by underlying internal states such as hunger, aggression, or arousal, our neurons are capable of incredible flexibility. For neuroscientists, it’s yet another wrinkle in understandin...

Rockefeller saliva test for COVID-19 outperforms commercial swab tests

The DRUL saliva assay is safer, more comfortable, and less expensive than comparable COVID screening tools. Now a new study demonstrates that it is at least as sensitive as swab tests, too.

Study reveals how ribosomes are assembled in human cells

Three-dimensional images of human small ribosomal subunits offer the most detailed explanation for how the cell's protein-making machines are assembled.

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Missing immune molecule may explain why some HPV patients sprout giant horn-like growths

Scientists identified a mutation that affects one’s reaction to HPV by decreasing the production of CD28, a vital molecule within the immune system.

Guido Guidotti, a biochemist and one of Rockefeller’s early graduates, has died

Guido Guidotti, who made contributions to biochemistry and performed pioneering work during his study in the lab of Lyman Craig, has died at the age of 87.

New microscopy technique reveals activity of one million neurons across the mouse brain

Using light beads microscopy, researchers can now capture images of a vast number of cells across different depths in the brain at high speed, with unprecedented clarity.

The physics behind a water bear's lumbering gait

Animals as small and soft as tardigrades seldom have legs and almost never bother walking. But a new study finds that water bears propel themselves through sediment and soil on eight stubby legs, in a manner resembling that of insects 500,000 times their size.

Natural infection versus vaccination: Differences in COVID antibody responses emerge

People who recover from COVID-19 may have better protection than those who received a vaccine, but the benefits of natural immunity do not outweigh the very real risk of disability and death from contracting the disease.