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How cells use mechanical tension sensors to interact with their environment

In a painstaking experiment, scientists suspended a single protein filament between two microscopic beads. Their results have shed light on an elusive process in which cells receive and respond to mechanical cues.

Rockefeller issues license for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drug

The novel compound, discovered in Jan L. Breslow’s lab and now licensed to Bridge Medicines, will be designed to treat immune-mediated diseases without harming the rest of the immune system.

New book by Rockefeller researcher spotlights one of nature’s fiercest hunters

Daniel Kronauer publishes a comprehensive monograph on army ants, the creatures at the center of his evolutionary-biology research.

Scientists discover mosquitoes’ unique blood-taste detectors

Female mosquitoes are armed with syringe-like stylets that begin to pump furiously only in the presence of blood. Scientists are now studying the specific neurons that line the stylet, and asking what mosquitoes taste when they bite us.

Rockefeller's Charles M. Rice honored with Nobel Prize for research that contributed to a cure for hepatitis C

Rice will receive the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for research that led to a cure for hepatitis C, a viral disease affecting 170 million people worldwide. His lab worked on the virus for three decades and became the first to produce a version of it that could be grown and studied in the laboratory.

Joanne Chory wins the 2020 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Joanne Chory, who pioneered the application of molecular genetics to plant biology and transformed our understanding of photosynthesis, will receive the prize in a virtual ceremony hosted by Rockefeller on October 22.

Cancer cells use nerve-cell tricks to spread from one organ to the next

New research suggests that breast and lung tumors metastasize by hijacking a neural signaling pathway, potentially opening the door to better diagnostics and treatments.

A revised map of where working memory resides in the brain

Findings from genetically diverse mice challenge long-held assumptions about how the brain is able to briefly hold onto important information.

Scientists trace severe COVID-19 to faulty genes and autoimmune condition

The findings explain why some people are so vulnerable to the infection, and suggest new avenues for treatment.

When the city locked down, RockEDU moved the lab bench to the kitchen table

With input from participating students and scientists who volunteer with RockEDU, a blended Summer Science Research Program for high-school students was developed. The result was a modified SSRP curriculum with five experiential research tracks, complete with lab supply kits that were mailed to students’ homes.

Recent Awards and Honors

Junyue Cao

Junyue Cao honored with NIH Director’s New Innovator Award

October 5, 2021

Cao receives this grant for work using single-cell genomic methods to enable developmental mapping of entire organisms. 

Luka Mesin

Luka Mesin named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalist

September 21, 2021

Mesin, from the Victora lab, is recognized for using novel techniques to better understand how B cells mature and evolve to create antibodies to fight off pathogens.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

Studies touting the durability and strength of natural immunity are hobbled by one crucial flaw. They are, by definition, assessing the responses only of people who survived Covid-19. The road to natural immunity is perilous and uncertain, Dr. Nussenzweig said.

Science Friday

Sofia Landi and Winrich Freiwald, two of the authors of the report, talk about the research, and what it may tell us about how the brain and memory are organized.

The Atlantic

Jean-Laurent Casanova believes that anyone who gets severely ill or dies from COVID is “immunodeficient” by definition—even if there is no current explanation for why they fared so poorly. Researchers say that continued advances in genetic sequencing will help unravel some of that mystery.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how the brain’s internal states drive its remarkable ability to reach different conclusion based on the same information. Also: The latest from Rockefeller’s COVID labs, and much more.


From this issue

 


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