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The future of TB is TBD 

Deadly and elusive, M. tuberculosis has ravaged the world for centuries. Armed with new technologies to study the pathogen, scientists may finally be poised to intervene.

30 young scientists receive Ph.D.s at Rockefeller’s 61st convocation

Since its inception, Rockefeller’s graduate program in bioscience has granted doctor of philosophy degrees to more than 1,290 students, including today’s graduates.

The River Campus is open for business

After four years of construction, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation–David Rockefeller River Campus has opened its doors to the community, with several labs already installed in its new research building.

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New molecular diagnostics test could help guide lupus treatments

A tool that detects glitches in gene expression could help doctors tailor treatments for lupus-related kidney damage.

Rockefeller tops global ranking of research excellence

An extensive international ranking of research institutions by U-Multirank gave Rockefeller top scores in several categories related to scientific impact and knowledge transfer.

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New research shows that mosquitoes sense repellent through their legs

Scientists made the surprising discovery that the insects’ displeasure for touching DEET, the active ingredient in many repellents, helps prevent bites.

Small brains, big decisions 

Life is full of binary choices, even for small animals like fruit flies. With new technologies, scientists can now dissect the mechanisms of decision making in the simplest of brains, at the levels of individual molecules, cells, and networks.

To curb infection, bacteria direct their defenses against themselves

To fight off invading viruses, bacteria have evolved a slew of creative defense tactics. New research shows that in some cases, microbes go to great lengths to keep an infection from spreading, even destroying bits of their own genetic material.

New compounds could be used to treat autoimmune disorders

In autoimmune disorders, the body’s defense system erroneously attacks normal cells, leading to serious health problems. Researchers have developed new molecules that potentially could be used to treat many of these conditions.

New study reveals gut segments organized by function, and opportunities for better drug design

New findings provide insights about how the intestine maximizes nutrient uptake, while at the same time protecting the body from potentially dangerous microbes.

Recent Awards and Honors

Albert J. Libchaber

Albert J. Libchaber named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 26, 2019

Libchaber is recognized for his contributions to the field of experimental condensed matter physics.

Two Rockefeller Scientists honored with NIH Director’s Awards

October 1, 2019

Brian T. Chait and Erich D. Jarvis received the NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award for high-risk, high-reward research. Read more about the awards here.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

A neuroscientist, Bruce McEwen showed how an unrelenting barrage of stress hormones can break down the body, leading to disease, depression, obesity and more.

Quanta Magazine

“In the human brain, glial cells are as abundant as neurons are. Yet we know orders of magnitude less about what they do than we know about the neurons,” said Shai Shaham, a professor of cell biology at the Rockefeller University who focuses on glia.

The Scientist

Florence Sabin, a scientist at Rockefeller in the early 20th century, was known for her pioneering research and efforts to support women in science.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 

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