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Becoming a Scientist: Priya Rajasethupathy 

Memories are inherently shifty. A neuroscientist with a new lab of her own, Rajasethupathy likens the brain’s memory function to Wikipedia—always evolving, occasionally unreliable.

From the tiny testes of flies, new insight into how genes arise

A common birthplace of new genes, the male testes are a hotspot for biological innovation. Within these organs, scientists have found a trove of virgin genetic sequences—and a better understanding of how evolution moves forward.

Findings shed new light on why Zika causes birth defects in some pregnancies

Researchers have shown that antibodies against Zika might be involved in causing birth defects in babies born to infected women. The findings might provide important caveats for the development of a vaccine.

With tiny technological tweezers, researchers uncover new aspects of cell division

Cell division is critical to creating and sustaining life. It’s also incredibly difficult to study. Now, advanced technology is enabling researchers to take their understanding of this process to the next level.

Interview: Ali H. Brivanlou 

With science constantly advancing, ethical boundaries need regular recalibration. It’s a task scientists cannot do alone, says Brivanlou; all of society needs to engage.

Exploring genetic “dark matter,” researchers gain new insights into autism and stroke

For the brain to function smoothly, its cells must carefully regulate which proteins are produced and when. By studying gene regulation, researchers are now shedding light on complex brain conditions like autism and stroke.

Fruit flies find their way by setting navigational goals

Navigating fruit flies do not have the luxury of GPS, but they do have a kind of neural compass. In a new study, researchers found that the animals decide which way to turn by comparing this internal compass needle to a fixed goal.

David Rockefeller Fellowships awarded to graduate students Stephanie Marcus and Zachary Mirman

The fellowships recognize their research and leadership within the student community.

Sebastian Klinge promoted to associate professor

Klinge studies the mechanisms by which ribosomes—the intricate machines that manufacture every cell’s proteins—are assembled.

Hinge-like protein may open new doors in cystic fibrosis treatment

Drugs known as potentiators alleviate some symptoms of cystic fibrosis. Researchers recently figured out how these compounds work—a finding that may lead to better drugs that patients can more easily afford.

Recent Awards and Honors

Albert J. Libchaber

Albert J. Libchaber named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 26, 2019

Libchaber is recognized for his contributions to the field of experimental condensed matter physics.

Two Rockefeller Scientists honored with NIH Director’s Awards

October 1, 2019

Brian T. Chait and Erich D. Jarvis received the NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award for high-risk, high-reward research. Read more about the awards here.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Scientist

Florence Sabin, a scientist at Rockefeller in the early 20th century, was known for her pioneering research and efforts to support women in science.

Scientific American

Research by the neuroendocrinologist Bruce McEwen into the effects of cortisol and other hormones marked a major contribution.

Scientific American

"What we do know tells us that if you are thin, you should thank your 'lean' genes and refrain from stigmatizing the obese. A broad acceptance of the biologic basis of obesity would not only be fair but would allow us to collectively focus on health." -Jeff Friedman

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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