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How mechanical forces nudge tumors toward malignancy

Researchers studying two forms of skin cancer identified a long-overlooked factor determining why some tumors are more likely to metastasize than others: the physical properties of the tissue in which the cancer originates. The findings might set the stage for new ways to monitor and treat the diseases in the future.

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Newly discovered anti-CRISPR protein gives viruses a leg up against bacteria

Molecular CRISPR-Cas systems, most commonly known for their usefulness as gene editing tools, are ancient defense mechanisms employed by bacteria against viruses. The discovery of a counteracting viral trick could inform scientists' efforts to develop future gene-editing technologies.

Study uncovers the molecular events by which popular antidepressants work

Scientists have outlined a molecular program by which serotonin reuptake inhibitors reshape the brain to alleviate depression. Their findings provide clues for how to make better and faster-acting versions of these drugs.

Life's inner mechanics 

Cells—and the molecules inside them—are always on the move. They’re being tugged at, prodded, reshuffled. Behind these actions are tiny forces that, after decades of neglect, are emerging as the next big thing in biology.

Will SARS-CoV-2 escape future drugs by mutating? The answer may be a nuanced “no.”

Scientists hope to deploy antibodies in the quest to end COVID-19. A recent study moves them closer to accomplishing a key step: finding out if the virus may acquire resistance to antibody-based drugs or vaccines, and how to potentially prevent this.


A never-before-seen image of the coronavirus copy machine

The high-resolution 3D image can speed COVID-19 drug discovery.

How toothless mock viruses could advance research on COVID-19

Scientists have engineered four viruses resembling SARS-CoV-2 to enable faster and safer research on vaccines and treatments.

Bacteria in the gut have a direct line to the brain

Scientists find that microbes inside the intestines can control the activities of neurons connecting the gut and brain.

Amid the rush for COVID-19 drugs, a case for the helicase

The enzyme is essential for the virus to replicate itself inside our cells. Scientists already have ideas for how to block it.

How neurons in body fat grow to boost calorie-burning capacity

Scientists have found that a hormone tells the brain to dramatically restructure neurons embedded in fat tissue.  Their work widens our understanding of how the body regulates its energy consumption, and how obesity might be treated in the future.

Recent Awards and Honors

Junyue Cao

Junyue Cao wins Science & SciLifeLab Grand Prize For Young Scientists

November 19, 2020

Cao is recognized for his work using single-cell genomic methods to enable developmental mapping of entire organisms, described in an essay published in Science.
LLuciano Marraffini portrait

Luciano Marraffini awarded Max Planck-Humboldt Medal

October 14, 2020

Marraffini receives the award for his achievements studying CRISPR-Cas, a bacterial immune mechanism whose discovery led to modern gene-editing tools.
More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Nature News

An innovative approach from Priya Rajasethupathy has been used to link genetics to behavior in mice. The analysis identifies a gene that underpins the role of the brain’s thalamus region in maintaining short-term memory.

NBC News

Research led by Jean-Laurent Casanova shows Covid-19 patients with life-threatening illness have antibodies that disable key immune system proteins called interferons.

Knowable Magazine

Just how sick we get from COVID-19 depends on genetic variations, including ones that sabotage immune molecules called interferons. Jean-Laurent Casanova's work aims to better understand why, which could lead to new treatments for COVID-19 and other scourges.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes us inside the response to the pandemic, where scientists are using every tool in the 21st century playbook to transform COVID-19 into a manageable disease. Also: Mosquito menace, The brain inside your gut, and Addiction then and now.


From this issue

 


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