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Inside the protein channel that keeps bacteria alive

A novel method for studying how one crucial membrane protein functions may pave the way for a new kind of broad-spectrum antibiotic.

Brain disease transmitted by tick bites may be treatable

The virus that causes tick-borne encephalitis appears to trick the immune system, misdirecting it into producing inferior antibodies. But new research shows some people produce more potent antibodies, providing hope for treatment.

Immunologist Katharine Hsu is named director of the Tri-Institutional M.D.-Ph.D. program

The joint program between Weill Cornell Medicine, The Rockefeller University, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will be lead by Hsu, an accomplished physician-scientist who specializes in immunology research and treatment of blood cancers.

Paul Cohen, expert on fat, is promoted to associate professor

Cohen, a physician-scientist exploring obesity and metabolic disease, has conducted groundbreaking research on the complex inner workings of fat tissue.

Immunologist Daniel Mucida promoted to professor

A pioneer in the field of mucosal immunology, Mucida is unlocking the secrets of the digestive system and answering fundamental questions about the origins of human disease.

Mary Jeanne Kreek, pioneer in studies of addiction, has died

Kreek conducted landmark studies that led to the establishment of methadone as a treatment for heroin addiction. Her work not only yielded new treatments for addiction disorders, but also influenced societal attitudes toward them. She was 84.

Paula Volent is named chief investment officer

The university has named its next vice president and chief investment officer. Volent, who for decades oversaw investments at Bowdoin College, will assume stewardship of Rockefeller's endowment in August.

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How one patient’s rare mutation helped solve a mycobacterial mystery

The discovery may explain why some patients suffer more severe reactions than others—putting us one step closer to understanding how our DNA influences our susceptibility to a wide range of infectious diseases.

Financial crashes, pandemics, Texas snow: How math could predict "black swan" events

Statistical modeling may one day help scientists anticipate and manage a wide range of extreme occurrences, according to a new study.

An old antibiotic may combat drug-resistant tuberculosis

Drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis bacteria affect half a million people a year. A compound first discovered in the 1980s may be able to help.

Recent Awards and Honors

Josefina del Mármol and Shiri Gur-Cohen receive Tri-Institutional Breakout Awards

June 3, 2021

del Mármol, from Vanessa Ruta’s lab, and Gur-Cohen, from Elaine Fuchs’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work.

Katya Vinogradova

Ekaterina V. Vinogradova named a Searle Scholar

May 20, 2021

Vinogradova receives the honor for her work designing chemical probes to dissect and alter immune protein function.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

“People who were infected and get vaccinated really have a terrific response, a terrific set of antibodies, because they continue to evolve their antibodies,” Dr. Nussenzweig said. “I expect that they will last for a long time.”

STAT News

“Depending potentially on the vaccination protocol, the vaccines are good enough to deal” with B.1.351 and other variants, said virologist Theodora Hatziioannou of Rockefeller University, an author of the study. “At least,” she added, “the variants we’ve seen up to now.” 

NPR

"People thought these genes were missing in birds and platypus, right? But they weren't missing. They just weren't sequenced with the older technologies," says Erich Jarvis.  

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes us inside the response to the pandemic, where scientists are using every tool in the 21st century playbook to transform COVID-19 into a manageable disease. Also: Mosquito menace, The brain inside your gut, and Addiction then and now.


From this issue

 


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