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Emeritus Professor Te Piao King, expert on allergens, has died

Te Piao King, a Rockefeller biochemist whose pioneering research greatly advanced the science and treatment of allergic reactions, died August 18 at the age of 90.  

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The common thread in severe COVID-19 

New studies point to a single molecular explanation for 20 percent of critical COVID-19 cases: insufficient or defective type I interferons.

Lonely flies, like many humans, eat more and sleep less

If COVID-19 lockdowns scrambled your sleep schedule and stretched your waistline, you're not alone. Fruit flies quarantined in test tubes sleep too little and eat too much after only one week of social isolation.

Study reveals how smell receptors work

The first-ever molecular images of an olfactory receptor at work answer decades-old questions about odor recognition.

When ant colonies get bigger, new foraging behavior emerges

By increasing the size of ant colonies bit by bit, scientists identified the mechanism responsible for the evolution of mass raiding behavior.

How cells draw on memories of past inflammation to respond to new threats

A new study uncovers a near-universal mechanism behind this phenomenon, known as inflammatory memory.

New Pearl Meister Greengard Prize exhibit celebrates the accomplishments of women scientists

The installation located in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Lounge features the 22 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize awardees.

Hunting for TB's most vulnerable genes

Not every gene that's essential in tuberculosis is also vulnerable to attack. A new study ranks essential genes by vulnerability, allowing researchers to better prioritize future drug targets.

Putting the brakes on immune reactions

Helper T cells may play a dual role in the immune system, both encouraging and suppressing the process by which B cells mature.

Identifying the spark of desire in fruit flies

In Drosophila’s neural circuitry for courtship, researchers discover a configuration that enables a male fruit fly to be persistent, yet flexible in his pursuit of a female.

Recent Awards and Honors

Seth A. Darst portrait

Seth A. Darst receives Gregori Aminoff Prize

September 14, 2021

Darst is recognized for his work examining RNA polymerase, the enzyme that copies DNA sequences into RNA.

Paul Cohen

Paul Cohen named an NAM Emerging Leader in Health and Medicine

September 14, 2021

Cohen receives the honor for his investigation of the molecular basis for metabolic diseases and cancer related to obesity.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

NPR

"Even in fully vaccinated, asymptomatic individuals, they can have enough virus to transmit it," says Robert Darnell, a physician scientist at the Rockefeller University. "Delta is very good at replicating, attaching and inserting itself into cells."

Scientific American

“Despite having completely different body structures, body sizes and environments that they’re moving through, there’s something about this particular coordination scheme that’s efficient across all of these conditions,” Jasmine Nirody said. 

Nature

Researchers, like Rockefeller’s Ali Brivanlou, are now permitted to grow human embryos in the lab for longer than 14 days. Here’s what they could learn. 

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how the brain’s internal states drive its remarkable ability to reach different conclusion based on the same information. Also: The latest from Rockefeller’s COVID labs, and much more.


From this issue

 


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