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Identifying the spark of desire in fruit flies

In Drosophila’s neural circuitry for courtship, researchers discover a configuration that enables a male fruit fly to be persistent, yet flexible in his pursuit of a female.

Purnell Choppin, pioneering virologist, has died

Purnell Choppin, a physician, virologist, and scientific administrator who performed pioneering research on viruses at The Rockefeller University and later exerted a powerful influence on biomedical research as president of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, has died at the age of 91.

Scientists discover a new class of neurons for remembering faces

Our brains have sensory cells, which process the faces that we see, and memory cells dedicated to storing data from person encounters. But until now, a hybrid neuron capable of linking vision to memory—and explaining how we recall familiar faces—remained elusive.

Robert G. Roeder named the 2021 Kyoto Prize laureate in basic sciences

Roeder, a pioneer in the field of gene regulation and expression, is being honored for revealing the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation.

Convocation 2021 caps a year like no other

For Rockefeller’s class of 2021, it has been a year with both challenges and accomplishments.

Toward the first drug to treat a rare, lethal liver cancer

After scouring more than 5,000 compounds, scientists have identified several new classes of therapeutics that may help treat fibrolamellar carcinoma.

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A missing antibody molecule may indicate when dengue will become deadly

The antibody's altered structure helps explain an enduring mystery of dengue—why only a fraction of those infected will develop severe disease.

How CRISPR promotes antibiotic resistance in bacteria

Whenever a cell uses CRISPR to defend itself, there's a chance of mutations creeping into its genetic code. Some of these mutations are harmless; others kill the cell. But fortuitous mutations can occasionally render major human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, antibiotic resistant.

Rockefeller leads an international ranking of research impact

According to this year’s CWTS Leiden Ranking of over 1200 universities from 69 countries, Rockefeller has the highest proportion of frequently cited scientific publications.

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Vaccines charge up natural immunity against SARS-CoV-2

Vaccination enhances antibodies in people who have had COVID, likely giving them protection even from the new variants.

Recent Awards and Honors

Sohail Tavazoie portrait

Sohail Tavazoie named president of the American Society of Clinical Investigation

April 12, 2022

A renowned physician-scientist, Tavazoie will lead the organization over the course of the next year.

Michel C. Nussenzweig portrait

Michel C. Nussenzweig receives the ASCI/Harrington Prize for Innovation in Medicine

March 24, 2022

Nussenzweig receives the honor for fundamental immunology discoveries that enabled the use of human antibodies to treat COVID-19.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Washington Post

“What we are looking for is potentially very rare genetic variants with a very big impact on the individual,” said András Spaan, a clinical microbiologist and fellow at the Rockefeller University in New York who is spearheading a search for genetic material responsible for coronavirus resistance.    

Science News

Michel Nussenzweig and colleagues examined what happens to the immune response after a third dose of vaccine, focusing especially on very long-lived immune cells called memory B cells. Those memory cells still made new antibodies when they got a third look at the vaccine.

Nature

Erich Jarvis says he wants the Human Pangenome Project to achieve a better representation of human genetic diversity. “I’m a person of colour. I grew up as an African American. I grew up as an under-represented minority in the sciences,” he says. “My diversity is not represented. So I have a personal motivation and a societal one to make sure that this pangenome really represents populations.”      

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how the brain’s internal states drive its remarkable ability to reach different conclusion based on the same information. Also: The latest from Rockefeller’s COVID labs, and much more.


From this issue

 


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