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Neuroscientist Vanessa Ruta promoted to associate professor

Ruta, who explores how brains produce such flexible responses to fixed stimuli, has been promoted to Gabrielle H. Reem and Herbert J. Kayden associate professor.

Daniel Kronauer, who uses ants to study social behavior, is promoted

Kronauer has been promoted to associate professor. He has dedicated his laboratory to investigating the molecular basis underlying complex social behavior among insects.

Mosquito sex protein could provide key to controlling disease

A protein transferred from male to female mosquitoes during sex influences female mating behavior—a phenomenon that could be exploited to limit the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses like Zika and dengue.

Michel C. Nussenzweig wins 2017 Sanofi-Institut Pasteur Award

Nussenzweig was honored at a ceremony today at the Institut Pasteur in Paris.The award recognizes investigators for past or ongoing work demonstrating real scientific progress in the life sciences.

Michael W. Young receives 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Young was honored for his discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm. He accepted the Nobel medal and diploma from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden.

Glial cells, not neurons, lead the way in brain assembly

Researchers have found that the cells directing the very first steps of brain formation are not other neurons, as scientists have long assumed. They've also uncovered previously hidden molecular pathways that attract neurons into the brain.

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In brief: A close look at how HIV-fighting proteins slow the virus down

A new study sheds light on how the body fights back against HIV by mutating the viral DNA.

Mary E. Hatten honored with the Ralph W. Gerard Prize in Neuroscience

Hatten is awarded for her significant contributions to neuroscience. She studies the mechanisms of neuronal differentiation and migration during the early stages of embryonic development.  

New study points the way to therapy for rare cancer that targets the young

Scientists have engineered a mouse model to study a rare and often-fatal form of liver cancer. They’ve used it to clarify what drives these tumors at the molecular level, and discover new drug concepts.

In the fight against viral infection, spelling counts

Scientists have discovered a peculiarity in the genetic code of HIV that might explain how this and other viruses evolved ways to dodge our immune system. The findings could make it possible to develop safer vaccines.

Recent Awards and Honors

Gabriel Victora named recipient of an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award

Gabriel Victora named recipient of an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award

October 2, 2018

Victora, head of the Laboratory of Lymphocyte Dynamics, received this grant to expand his novel method that makes it possible to monitor physical interactions between cells.

hixin Liu and Jeremy Rock have each received NIH Director’s New Innovator Awards

Shixin Liu and Jeremy Rock have each received NIH Director’s New Innovator Awards

October 2, 2018

Liu, head of the Laboratory of Nanoscale Biophysics and Biochemistry, and Rock, head of the Laboratory of Host-Pathogen Biology, received grants that are part of the NIH’s High-Risk, High-Reward Research Program.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Science

"Error-free genomes from a broad sampling of vertebrates will enable researchers 'to address questions not possible to [answer] before,' adds neuroscientist Erich Jarvis of The Rockefeller University in New York City, who leads G10K."

New York Times

By looking at which genes are activated in the brains of queens and workers of different ant species, Dr. [Daniel] Kronauer and his colleagues determined that a hormone called insulin-peptide 2, or ILP2, played the most important role.

Scientific American

As [A. James] Hudspeth explored the neural mechanisms of hearing over the years, he developed a special appreciation for the intricate anatomy of the inner ear—an appreciation that transcends the laboratory. “I think we as scientists tend to underemphasize the aesthetic aspect of science,” he says.

 

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Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.