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Researchers uncover molecular mechanisms of rare skin disease

Scientists describe a group of proteins that protect cells from a subtype of human papilloma virus. They also outline genetic mutations that make this virus unusually harmful in people with epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a rare skin condition.

Lack of a single molecule may indicate severe and treatment-resistant depression

Researchers find that a deficiency of acetyl-L-carnitine is associated with a particular subtype of depression. Individuals with very low levels of this molecule often have highly severe symptoms and don’t respond to traditional antidepressants.

Ant study sheds light on the evolution of workers and queens

A new study in ants identifies a peptide that plays an important role in regulating reproduction. This research illuminates a potential trajectory for the evolution of distinct social castes—workers and queens.

Giant neurons in the brain may play similarly giant role in awareness and cognition

Scientists find that certain neurons release nitric oxide onto nearby blood vessels, and potentially use this mechanism to control awareness in the brain.

Erich Jarvis receives grant from W.M. Keck foundation

With a new grant from the W.M. Keck foundation, the Jarvis Lab will further their research on the genes and neural circuits involved in speech production.

Studies reveal possible origin of human speech

Scientists have long debated the evolutionary origins of human speech. New research reveals neural circuits in the brains of monkeys that may represent the source of our unique speech capabilities.

Scientists discover a mechanism of drug resistance in breast and ovarian cancer

A new study helps explain why certain cancers don't respond to treatment, and offers hope for overcoming this deadly resistance.

New faculty member studies the mechanics of development, challenging long-held assumptions

Earlier this month, developmental biologist Amy Shyer joined the Rockefeller community as an assistant professor. Shyer combines mechanical and molecular perspectives to better understand how patterns form and how tissues develop.

Three Rockefeller scientists promoted to professor

Sean Brady, Winrich Freiwald, and Luciano Marraffini have been promoted to professor. Respectively, these scientists have characterized previously unknown small molecules, provided insight into how the brain processes faces, and revolutionized gene editing.

Rockefeller University Press launches new science journal with the publishing arms of EMBO and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Life Science Alliance is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal with a streamlined manuscript submission and review process.

Recent Awards and Honors

Elaine Fuchs elected fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

December 11, 2018

Fuchs, Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor and head of the Robin Chemers Neustein Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development, is honored for her pioneering study of the molecular mechanisms by which skin stem cells make and repair tissues and deviate in aging and cancer.

Christian Mayer

Christian Mayer receives Robert Koch Postdoctoral Award for Immunology

November 16, 2018

Mayer, a postdoctoral associate in Michel C. Nussenzweig’s lab, was a joint winner of this year’s award for his research in the field of adaptive immunity.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

"Dr. Nirody, who will start research at Rockefeller University this coming year, and Judy Jinn, were graduate students in the lab of Robert J. Full at the University of California, Berkeley, when they decided to subject the geckos’ water running to greater scrutiny. They built a tank, acquired some house geckos and used video to document the geckos’ water running in a controlled environment so that it could be mathematically analyzed."

Newsweek

"'I was sick of hearing that my lab members couldn't find complete versions of the genes we were working on,' Leslie Vosshall, another author of the study from Rockefeller, said in a statement. 'So, I took my frustration to Twitter, and quickly assembled the Aedes Genome Working Group.'"

The New York Times

"It was beginning to look hopeless for obese people. Then, in 1995, Dr. Jeffrey Friedman of Rockefeller University discovered what looked like the equivalent of insulin for diabetes—a molecule he called leptin that is secreted by fat cells and tells the brain how much fat the body has."

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue includes a deep dive into the science that could finally end HIV; a conversation with neuroscientist Cori Bargmann about the brain’s intrinsic nature; and a lot more.


From this issue

 

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Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.