Skip to main content

Uncovering the early origins of Huntington’s disease

The symptoms of Huntington’s typically appear in middle age, but the disease may in fact originate much earlier. New research shows that a patient’s neural abnormalities may arise already during embryonic development—suggesting that treating the disease early may be beneficial.

New immunotherapy approach boosts body’s ability to destroy cancer cells

A new treatment may help cancer patients who don't respond to traditional immunotherapy. Findings from the first-ever clinical trial reveal that it is effective in activating immune cells that kill cancer cells.

>

In brief: Variation between strains may account for differences in people’s vulnerability to infection

New research shows that subtle differences between bacterial strains may cause dramatic differences in outcome between people infected with the same microbe.

>

In brief: How the immune system curbs its own mistakes

Researchers discovered how apoptosis keeps potential cancer-causing mutations in check.

Proof of principle: Tri-I TDI drug candidates “graduate” to next phase of development

As inaugural Sanders Director Dr. Michael Foley is set to depart the Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute later this year, two projects from a portfolio of 57 that the Tri-I TDI has supported are now ready for the next phase of therapeutic development—a phase intended to lead to investigational new drugs.

3D imaging of fat reveals potential targets for new obesity treatments

With new imaging methods, scientists hope to make significant progress in the fight against obesity. A new report reveals striking images of neural projections within fat tissue, and clues for the development of new drugs.

>

In brief: Immune cells surveil intestine to prevent infections

Scientists found that immune cells called intraepithelial lymphocytes act as a surveillance force at the intestine, helping to generate an appropriate immune response to both friendly bacteria and dangerous pathogens.

In brief: New clues about how cells restart stalled replication

Scientists studying the cell’s DNA-copying machinery have discovered a molecular mechanism that helps reactivate it should it stop prematurely. Its function may prevent genetic errors like those that cause cancer.

Brain research points the way to new treatments for nicotine addiction

Scientists have discovered a group of brain cells that may play a role in keeping smokers addicted to nicotine. Their work could ultimately lead to new drugs to help people conquer their tobacco dependence.

Neuroscientist Vanessa Ruta promoted to associate professor

Ruta, who explores how brains produce such flexible responses to fixed stimuli, has been promoted to Gabrielle H. Reem and Herbert J. Kayden associate professor.

Recent Awards and Honors

Elaine Fuchs elected fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

December 11, 2018

Fuchs, Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor and head of the Robin Chemers Neustein Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development, is honored for her pioneering study of the molecular mechanisms by which skin stem cells make and repair tissues and deviate in aging and cancer.

Portrait of David C. Gadsby

David C. Gadsby named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 27, 2018

Gadsby, Patrick A. Gerschel Family Professor Emeritus, is recognized for his study of ion transport proteins in cell membranes, including the CFTR channel whose mutation causes cystic fibrosis.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

"It was beginning to look hopeless for obese people. Then, in 1995, Dr. Jeffrey Friedman of Rockefeller University discovered what looked like the equivalent of insulin for diabetes—a molecule he called leptin that is secreted by fat cells and tells the brain how much fat the body has."

Science

"Error-free genomes from a broad sampling of vertebrates will enable researchers 'to address questions not possible to [answer] before,' adds neuroscientist Erich Jarvis of The Rockefeller University in New York City, who leads G10K."

New York Times

By looking at which genes are activated in the brains of queens and workers of different ant species, Dr. [Daniel] Kronauer and his colleagues determined that a hormone called insulin-peptide 2, or ILP2, played the most important role.

 

Instagram


Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.