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Recent donations establish centers for computational science and for metabolism, and renew resources for faculty recruitment

The university’s Campaign for Transforming Biomedicine—which raised $1.17 billion over eight years—closed this summer with a bang: three significant capstone gifts, made in the campaign’s final months, to directly support Rockefeller science.

Becoming a Scientist: Priya Rajasethupathy 

Memories are inherently shifty. A neuroscientist with a new lab of her own, Rajasethupathy likens the brain’s memory function to Wikipedia—always evolving, occasionally unreliable.

From the tiny testes of flies, new insight into how genes arise

A common birthplace of new genes, the male testes are a hotspot for biological innovation. Within these organs, scientists have found a trove of virgin genetic sequences—and a better understanding of how evolution moves forward.

Findings shed new light on why Zika causes birth defects in some pregnancies

Researchers have shown that antibodies against Zika might be involved in causing birth defects in babies born to infected women. The findings might provide important caveats for the development of a vaccine.

With tiny technological tweezers, researchers uncover new aspects of cell division

Cell division is critical to creating and sustaining life. It’s also incredibly difficult to study. Now, advanced technology is enabling researchers to take their understanding of this process to the next level.

Interview: Ali H. Brivanlou 

With science constantly advancing, ethical boundaries need regular recalibration. It’s a task scientists cannot do alone, says Brivanlou; all of society needs to engage.

Exploring genetic “dark matter,” researchers gain new insights into autism and stroke

For the brain to function smoothly, its cells must carefully regulate which proteins are produced and when. By studying gene regulation, researchers are now shedding light on complex brain conditions like autism and stroke.

Fruit flies find their way by setting navigational goals

Navigating fruit flies do not have the luxury of GPS, but they do have a kind of neural compass. In a new study, researchers found that the animals decide which way to turn by comparing this internal compass needle to a fixed goal.

David Rockefeller Fellowships awarded to graduate students Stephanie Marcus and Zachary Mirman

The fellowships recognize their research and leadership within the student community.

Sebastian Klinge promoted to associate professor

Klinge studies the mechanisms by which ribosomes—the intricate machines that manufacture every cell’s proteins—are assembled.

Recent Awards and Honors

Jeremy M. Rock portrait

Jeremy Rock selected as a Rita Allen Foundation Scholar

July 31, 2019

Rock receives the award for his study of the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

Shixin Liu portrait

Shixin Liu receives a Pershing Square Sohn Prize for Young Investigators in Cancer Research

July 28, 2020

Liu receives the award for his exploration of undesirable epigenetic changes that can lead to a variety of diseases, including cancer.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

NIH Director's Blog

The findings from the Nussenzweig lab help not only to understand the immune response to COVID-19, they are also critical for vaccine design, revealing what a strong neutralizing antibody for SARS-CoV-2 should look like to help the immune system win.

The Scientist

Erich Jarvis on what we can and must do to make science more equitable.

Scientific American

As drug-resistant superbugs spread, Vincent Fischetti and others are turning to microbes that kill bacteria. At a time when much of the world is besieged by a virus, it's good to know that these tiny invaders may someday save us.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


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