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New findings to boost IVF success rates

New research casts doubt on a genetic test used to screen would-be embryos for IVF implantation. The findings suggests that these embryos can develop into healthy babies regardless of whether or not they’ve been flagged as defective by the test.

Scientists release error-free genomes of 25 animals—with another 70,000 coming up

Scientists have launched an ambitious effort to produce high-quality reference genomes for all vertebrate species, from mammals to birds and reptiles. The result could be discoveries with implications for animal conservation as well as human health and disease.

A case for simplifying gene nomenclature across different organisms

Scientists call it oxytocin in humans, isotocin in fish, mesotocin in birds, and valitocin in sharks. But according to a new study, it’s all the same hormone—and high time we settled on just one name.


New Caspary exhibit honors 58 Rockefeller award winners, past and present

Redesigning the exhibit provided an opportunity to consider how to best honor and commemorate Rockefeller award winners. Discussions with university leadership and an ad-hoc faculty committee steered the process and led to a broadening of the criteria for inclusion.

Evolutionary biologist and ornithologist Richard Prum receives the 2021 Lewis Thomas Prize

The author of The Evolution of Beauty was presented with Rockefeller’s science writing award, which honors scientists as inspirational authors.

Study of “breakthrough” cases suggests COVID testing may be here to stay

Two new cases helped scientists confirm what many have come to suspect: that people can get infected by SARS-CoV-2 variants even after successful vaccination. The findings suggest continued testing may be needed to prevent future outbreaks in a post-vaccine world. 

Inside the protein channel that keeps bacteria alive

A novel method for studying how one crucial membrane protein functions may pave the way for a new kind of broad-spectrum antibiotic.

Brain disease transmitted by tick bites may be treatable

The virus that causes tick-borne encephalitis appears to trick the immune system, misdirecting it into producing inferior antibodies. But new research shows some people produce more potent antibodies, providing hope for treatment.

Immunologist Katharine Hsu is named director of the Tri-Institutional M.D.-Ph.D. program

The joint program between Weill Cornell Medicine, The Rockefeller University, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will be lead by Hsu, an accomplished physician-scientist who specializes in immunology research and treatment of blood cancers.

Paul Cohen, expert on fat, is promoted to associate professor

Cohen, a physician-scientist exploring obesity and metabolic disease, has conducted groundbreaking research on the complex inner workings of fat tissue.

Recent Awards and Honors

Sohail Tavazoie portrait

Sohail Tavazoie named president of the American Society of Clinical Investigation

April 12, 2022

A renowned physician-scientist, Tavazoie will lead the organization over the course of the next year.

Michel C. Nussenzweig portrait

Michel C. Nussenzweig receives the ASCI/Harrington Prize for Innovation in Medicine

March 24, 2022

Nussenzweig receives the honor for fundamental immunology discoveries that enabled the use of human antibodies to treat COVID-19.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Washington Post

“What we are looking for is potentially very rare genetic variants with a very big impact on the individual,” said András Spaan, a clinical microbiologist and fellow at the Rockefeller University in New York who is spearheading a search for genetic material responsible for coronavirus resistance.    

Science News

Michel Nussenzweig and colleagues examined what happens to the immune response after a third dose of vaccine, focusing especially on very long-lived immune cells called memory B cells. Those memory cells still made new antibodies when they got a third look at the vaccine.

Nature

Erich Jarvis says he wants the Human Pangenome Project to achieve a better representation of human genetic diversity. “I’m a person of colour. I grew up as an African American. I grew up as an under-represented minority in the sciences,” he says. “My diversity is not represented. So I have a personal motivation and a societal one to make sure that this pangenome really represents populations.”      

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how the brain’s internal states drive its remarkable ability to reach different conclusion based on the same information. Also: The latest from Rockefeller’s COVID labs, and much more.


From this issue

 


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