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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
!
Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

Kivanç Birsoy receives 2020 Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise

Birsoy is honored for his research examining how metabolic pathways regulate biological processes and contribute to disease.

Rockefeller joins tri-institutional Ph.D. program in computational biology

Data analysis is becoming increasingly important in all fields of science. In joining the program, Rockefeller will connect with a stream of talented students focused on computational problems.

Patient with unusually severe infection leads scientists to a rare type of immune deficiency

A rare genetic change may explain why some people die from cytomegalovirus, a stealth pathogen that is often asymptomatic.

Erich D. Jarvis speaks with high-school students about the evolution of speech and diversity in science

On a recent Saturday, over 400 teens crowded into Caspary Auditorium to hear Jarvis’s 2020 Talking science seminar, “Singing in the Brain: A Personal Science Journey.”

Small containers inside cells might offer new targets for cancer treatment

For reasons that have long been unclear, cells stop dividing when the pH rises inside tiny cellular compartments called lysosomes. Now scientists have found an explanation for this phenomenon, with potential implications for drug development.

Leslie B. Vosshall to receive Pradel Research Award

The National Academy of Sciences announced that Vosshall will receive the honor for her research on how mosquitoes seek out and bite human hosts.

How decisions unfold in a zebrafish brain

Tracking neuronal activity in a zebrafish brain, researchers can predict when the fish will flip its tail and to which direction, left or right.

How to starve a tumor 

Scientists are learning how tumor cells’ nutritional needs differ from those of normal cells. Will their work help launch the next genre of cancer therapies?

Scientists examine how a gut infection may produce chronic symptoms

For some unlucky people, a bout of intestinal distress like traveler’s diarrhea leads to irritable bowel syndrome. Recent discoveries have given scientists a better idea of how this happens, and potential leads for new treatments.

Neuroscientist Bruce McEwen, who studied the impact of stress on the brain, has died

A pioneer in neuroendocrinology, McEwen’s work on how the brain changes throughout life has profound implications for public health. He died on January 2, at age 81.

Insects on a diet, zombie neurons, and other memorable science stories of 2019

Rockefeller researchers accomplished a lot this year. We look back at 12 of the most exciting science stories of 2019.

A surprising new source of attention in the brain

Scientists find a new brain area in control of our attention skills, raising new questions in what has long been considered a settled scientific field.

New clues about why a universal flu vaccine is so elusive

To scientists' surprise, the immune system develops its response to each virus variant mostly from scratch, instead of building on what it has already learned.

Researchers discover a new mechanism in childhood kidney cancer

A problem in reader proteins that identify which gene is up for expression may cause normal cells to turn malignant during development.

Collaborative Research Center installation bridges past and present scientists

A new digital display, the Scientist Explorer, is a portal into the cumulative accomplishments of researchers with labs in Flexner and Smith Halls.

Scientists develop new method that predicts vulnerability to stress

Researchers have identified a set of biological factors in mice that seem to determine one's ability to bounce back from a traumatic event, and provide preliminary evidence that a naturally-occurring substance may help boost resiliency in the face of stressful situations.

Five-year strategic plan is approved by Board of Trustees

Here are the main priorities of the new plan, intended to maximize the university’s scientific impact through 2024.

Neurodegenerative diseases may be caused by molecular transportation failures inside neurons

Protein clumps are routinely found in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Now researchers find a link between this buildup and the intracellular movement of proteasomes, molecular machines tasked with degrading protein waste inside cells.

A summer program that gives undergraduates the tools to ask big scientific questions

Madeleine Delbeau, who spent 10 weeks in the lab of Seth A. Darst, improves a method for cryo-electron microscopy.

Zoran Jankovic, a member of the Nussenzweig lab for nearly two decades, dies at 60

Zoran Jankovic, known for his generous spirit and unassuming manner, worked in the Nussenzweig lab for nearly 20 years.

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Study sheds new light on how epigenetic events might spur disease

Research that began with the analysis of two developmental syndromes ultimately helped scientists understand how diverse epigenetic mechanisms can combine to drive tissue overgrowth in cancer.

The pathway to Parkinson’s takes a surprising twist

A new study finds that neurons affected in Parkinson’s disease can shut down without fully dying, allowing them to also switch off neighboring cells. The findings might give scientists a better understanding of how the condition wreaks havoc in the brain, as well as ideas for new treatments.

Lymphatic system found to play key role in hair regeneration

To grow new hair, stem cells throughout the skin must work in sync. Researchers have discovered the molecular communication tool, part of the lymphatic system, that the cells use to synchronize their activities.  

The Abby Dining Room turns a page

Earlier this month, the Abby reopened with table service, libations, and new menus.

Xiaowei Zhuang will receive the 2019 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Zhuang, who pioneered the development of super-resolution and genome-scale imaging techniques, will be given the prize during a ceremony on the Rockefeller campus on November 19.

Study pinpoints rare genetic change that may boost risk of HPV-related illness

The human papilloma virus is usually kept in check by the immune system, but scientists identified a genetic variant that makes some infected children prone to developing warts in the throat.

C. David Allis elected to the National Academy of Medicine

Allis, whose pioneering research established that enzymes that modify histone proteins, which package DNA in the nucleus, regulate gene expression, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.

Biologist and ant paparazzo Daniel Kronauer recognized in Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition

An expert on ant biology, Kronauer found himself in the right place at the right time to capture a cathedral-shaped bivouac, or ants’ nest, in Costa Rica. The photo is now part of an international exhibit by the prestigious Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.

Research on cell division provides new clues to how a common cancer treatment works

In studying cell division, scientists happened upon a new way of understanding how a chemotherapy compound works. The findings could make it possible to predict which patients are most likely to benefit from the drug.

Shapeshifting receptors may explain mysterious drug failures

Scientists have found that many receptors with high potential for drug discovery take a different configuration inside the body than in the test tube. The findings could explain why some promising drugs fail in clinical trials, and potentially open doors to new drug-development approaches.