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Paula Volent is named chief investment officer

The university has named its next vice president and chief investment officer. Volent, who for decades oversaw investments at Bowdoin College, will assume stewardship of Rockefeller's endowment in August.

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How one patient’s rare mutation helped solve a mycobacterial mystery

The discovery may explain why some patients suffer more severe reactions than others—putting us one step closer to understanding how our DNA influences our susceptibility to a wide range of infectious diseases.

Financial crashes, pandemics, Texas snow: How math could predict "black swan" events

Statistical modeling may one day help scientists anticipate and manage a wide range of extreme occurrences, according to a new study.

An old antibiotic may combat drug-resistant tuberculosis

Drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis bacteria affect half a million people a year. A compound first discovered in the 1980s may be able to help.

Why male mosquitoes leave humans alone

Unlike their female counterparts, male mosquitoes have no desire to bite us. But the hardware for host-seeking is hidden in the male mosquito brain, locked behind a simple genetic switch. 

This fish is about to flip 

An elaborate set of zebrafish experiments is shining light on one of neuroscience’s greatest enigmas: How brains make decisions. By tracking neural activity, scientists can now predict a fish’s next move before it happens.

Rockefeller grants commercial license for the development of monoclonal antibodies for treatment of COVID-19

The treatment, a combination of two antibodies, has been shown highly capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 in preclinical studies. Researchers hope it will give countries around the world, including developing countries, a way to control the rampant disease.

COVID-19 vaccines may need regular updates for emerging variants

Lab experiments suggest that the new strains reported in Britain, South Africa, and Brazil may blunt the potency of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines. This could mean that the vaccines will need updates as the virus mutates.

Neurophysiologist Victor Wilson, 92, has died

Victor Wilson, a neurophysiologist who traced the intricate neural mechanisms that govern our balance and posture, died on January 20 at the age of 92.

Synthetic “micro lungs” could take COVID-19 research to the next level

Scientists have developed stem-cell technology to mass-produce tissue cultures resembling our breathing organs. These tissues offer a powerful model in which to study how SARS-CoV-2 wreaks havoc in the lungs and to screen for new drugs.

Recent Awards and Honors

Tomasz Ahrends and Kevin Gonzales receive Tri-Institutional Breakout Awards

June 2, 2022

Tomasz Ahrends, from Daniel Mucida’s lab, and Kevin Gonzales, from Elaine Fuchs’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work.

Leslie B. Vosshall

Leslie B. Vosshall named a member of the American Philosophical Society

June 1, 2022

Vosshall is honored for her investigation of how sensory stimuli are perceived and processed.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Washington Post

“What we are looking for is potentially very rare genetic variants with a very big impact on the individual,” said András Spaan, a clinical microbiologist and fellow at the Rockefeller University in New York who is spearheading a search for genetic material responsible for coronavirus resistance.    

Science News

Michel Nussenzweig and colleagues examined what happens to the immune response after a third dose of vaccine, focusing especially on very long-lived immune cells called memory B cells. Those memory cells still made new antibodies when they got a third look at the vaccine.

Nature

Erich Jarvis says he wants the Human Pangenome Project to achieve a better representation of human genetic diversity. “I’m a person of colour. I grew up as an African American. I grew up as an under-represented minority in the sciences,” he says. “My diversity is not represented. So I have a personal motivation and a societal one to make sure that this pangenome really represents populations.”      

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue explores how stem cells help our bodies form, develop, and heal—and how they’re powering a new surge in science. Also: Do flies ever get lonely? And much more.


From this issue

 


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