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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

David Rockefeller Fellowships awarded to graduate students Stephanie Marcus and Zachary Mirman

The fellowships recognize their research and leadership within the student community.

Sebastian Klinge promoted to associate professor

Klinge studies the mechanisms by which ribosomes—the intricate machines that manufacture every cell’s proteins—are assembled.

Hinge-like protein may open new doors in cystic fibrosis treatment

Drugs known as potentiators alleviate some symptoms of cystic fibrosis. Researchers recently figured out how these compounds work—a finding that may lead to better drugs that patients can more easily afford.

Celebrating and remembering Mitchell Feigenbaum, physicist who pioneered chaos theory

A mathematical physicist, Feigenbaum's groundbreaking work on deterministic chaos influenced fields ranging from cardiology to cartography. He died on June 30, at age 74.

Three-dimensional model illuminates key aspects of early development

Researchers have created a new 3D model of human embryonic tissue that promises to shed light on critical components of development—including processes that go awry during pregnancy complications.

New research raises prospect of better anti-obesity drugs

Scientists have found a group of brain cells that influence body mass in two ways, by controlling how much we eat as well as how much energy we burn. The findings could lead to new drugs to help people shed weight.

Learning from experience is all in the timing

Animals learn the hard way which sights, sounds, and smells are relevant to survival. New research in flies shows that the timing of these cues plays an important role in how mental associations arise, and elucidates brain pathways involved in this process.

The future of TB is TBD 

Deadly and elusive, M. tuberculosis has ravaged the world for centuries. Armed with new technologies to study the pathogen, scientists may finally be poised to intervene.

The River Campus is open for business

After four years of construction, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation–David Rockefeller River Campus has opened its doors to the community, with several labs already installed in its new research building.

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New molecular diagnostics test could help guide lupus treatments

A tool that detects glitches in gene expression could help doctors tailor treatments for lupus-related kidney damage.

Recent Awards and Honors

LLuciano Marraffini portrait

Luciano Marraffini awarded Max Planck-Humboldt Medal

October 14, 2020

Marraffini receives the award for his achievements studying CRISPR-Cas, a bacterial immune mechanism whose discovery led to modern gene-editing tools.

Amelia Escolano and Marc Schneeberger Pané named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalists

September 23, 2020

Escolano, from Michel C. Nussenzweig’s lab, and Schneeberger Pané, from Jeffrey M. Friedman’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work in the life sciences category.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

CNN

"The vast majority of antibiotics we use today come from growing bacteria out of soil," said Sean Brady, a chemical biologist and professor at The Rockefeller University in New York City. Though we came up with ways to make them ourselves, it was in dirt that these antibiotics were first discovered.

NIH Director's Blog

Two studies from Jean-Laurent Casanova suggest that one reason some otherwise healthy people become gravely ill may be previously unknown trouble spots in their immune systems, which hamper their ability to fight the virus.

The Washington Post

“We’re all a few in a cast of thousands,” Charles Rice said. “I feel a little bit odd — a combination of humbled and embarrassed. I think there are many people who should feel very good about what they contributed today.”

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


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