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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
!
Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

Eight Rockefeller scientists designated most influential researchers

Clarivate, a British analytics company, recognizes individuals "who demonstrate significant and broad influence among their peers in their chosen field or fields of research."

From the piano bench to the lab bench

Gabriel D. Victora is unlocking the mysteries of how the body generates antibodies to defend itself from pathogens. But there was a time when science was not even on his radar.

Promising new drug target for a rare liver cancer

Fibrolamellar carcinoma needs one specific mutation in order to thrive, and impeding it reduces tumor growth in mice.

Fruit flies move their retinas much like humans move their eyes

Insects cannot move their eyes the way humans do during a tennis game. But new research suggests fruit flies evolved a different strategy to adjust their vision without moving their heads.

New evidence of biochemical states and force working in concert

When an actin filament bends during cell movement, older actin deforms differently than newer actin, allowing regulatory proteins to tell the two states apart.

Mathematical modeling suggests counties are still unprepared for COVID spikes

If jurisdictions plan to share resources in advance, the study concludes, this could prevent one rare event from overwhelming a county or state.

Shixin Liu wins 2023 Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science

Liu is one of four scientists across the country to receive the prestigious prize, which recognizes scientists who have immigrated to the United States for early-career contributions.

Why some people are mosquito magnets

The female mosquito will hunt down any human, but some of us get bitten far more than others. The answer why may be hidden in our skin.

Sohail Tavazoie elected to the National Academy of Medicine

A trailblazing physician-scientist, Tavazoie has substantially expanded our understanding of the mechanisms enabling some tumors to spread from one body site to another. He is the 18th member of Rockefeller’s faculty elected to the academy.

Albany Medical Center Prize awarded to C. David Allis

Allis receives the honor for discovering new mechanisms regulating gene expression.

The brain cells that slow us down when we're sick

New study pinpoints the cluster of neurons that tell mice to eat, drink, and move around less when they're fighting bacterial infections.  

New workshop brings exceptional scholars to campus

Postdoctoral fellows from diverse backgrounds attended the two-day program, designed to ease their transition to independent investigators.

Common mutation linked to COVID mortality

Because three percent of the world population possesses these gene variants, the findings may have implications for hundreds of millions of individuals around the world.

Josefina del Mármol named Blavatnik Regional Award Winner in life sciences

Del Mármol receives the honor for her research leading to the first-ever molecular images of an olfactory receptor at work.

The tech that money can’t buy 

What if the tool needed to move science forward doesn’t yet exist? Here are gadgets and techniques born from improvisation that made impossible experiments possible.

Tim Stearns becomes new dean of graduate and postgraduate studies

Stearns, who assumes the role on September 1, reflects upon his new job and his vision for the university’s educational programs.

Rockefeller postdocs Begüm Aydin and Alain Bonny named Hanna Gray Fellows

Aydin, of the Mucida lab, and Bonny, a member of the Fuchs lab, received HHMI’s prestigious fellowship for exceptional early career scientists on August 24.

Unlocking the mystery of how mosquitoes smell humans

Through questioning their assumptions about how mosquitoes sense and interpret odors, scientists may have discovered why efforts to throw the vectors of dengue and Zika off the human scent have not succeeded.

Nicola Khuri, theoretical physicist and scientific-community builder, has died

Nicola N. Khuri, a theoretical physicist known for using math to describe and predict what happens when elementary particles collide in giant accelerators, died on August 4 at age 89.

New faculty member unlocks vast chemical spaces for drug discovery

Jiankun Lyu will join Rockefeller as an assistant professor on January 1, 2023.

New faculty member plumbs the depths of fast-track evolution 

Lamia Wahba will join Rockefeller as an assistant professor on January 1, 2023.

Ant colonies behave like neural networks when making decisions 

Colonies decide to flee rising temperatures in much the same way that neural computations give rise to decisions.

How the intestine replaces and repairs itself

A new study suggests that stem cells are able to integrate cues from their surroundings and coordinate their behavior across tissue through networks of vasculature in their close vicinity.

Stem cells are growing up 

The controversy and hype have died down. The science is very much alive­, creating new directions for discovery.

Colorectal cancer tumors both helped and hindered by T cells

Researchers have long disagreed over whether 𝛄𝛅T cells in the gut promote or discourage tumor growth, but new evidence suggests they have the capacity to do both.

New study reveals where memory fragments are stored

The research demonstrates the distributed nature of memory processing in the brain, and reveals a dedicated pathway for memory recall, which is less understood than memory formation.

A venerable tree ends its tenure

After gracing the university’s north-south pathway for decades, a London plane tree was cut down due to interior decay and the resulting safety risk. Removal of the deciduous giant required a team of highly-experienced arborists.

Beak speak 

How did songbirds start singing? Neuroscientists are reshaping our understanding of speech—pinpointing the cells and molecules that built it and what happens in the brain when we learn a new word, chirp, or squeal.

New portrait of five trailblazing women scientists from Rockefeller’s past is unveiled

With a new portrait by artist Brenda Zlamany, installed over the fireplace in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Reception Hall, the likenesses of scientists Marie Daly, Rebecca Lancefield, Louise Pearce, Gertrude Perlmann, and Florence Sabin have joined the university’s art collection.

Philanthropy 2.0 

Private investments are making it possible to reimagine 21st-century bioscience. Cori Bargmann envisions a future with opportunity for researchers everywhere.
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