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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
!
Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

Nicola Khuri, theoretical physicist and scientific-community builder, has died

Nicola N. Khuri, a theoretical physicist known for using math to describe and predict what happens when elementary particles collide in giant accelerators, died on August 4 at age 89.

New faculty member unlocks vast chemical spaces for drug discovery

Jiankun Lyu will join Rockefeller as an assistant professor on January 1, 2023.

New faculty member plumbs the depths of fast-track evolution 

Lamia Wahba will join Rockefeller as an assistant professor on January 1, 2023.

Ant colonies behave like neural networks when making decisions 

Colonies decide to flee rising temperatures in much the same way that neural computations give rise to decisions.

How the intestine replaces and repairs itself

A new study suggests that stem cells are able to integrate cues from their surroundings and coordinate their behavior across tissue through networks of vasculature in their close vicinity.

Stem cells are growing up 

The controversy and hype have died down. The science is very much alive­, creating new directions for discovery.

Colorectal cancer tumors both helped and hindered by T cells

Researchers have long disagreed over whether 𝛄𝛅T cells in the gut promote or discourage tumor growth, but new evidence suggests they have the capacity to do both.

New study reveals where memory fragments are stored

The research demonstrates the distributed nature of memory processing in the brain, and reveals a dedicated pathway for memory recall, which is less understood than memory formation.

A venerable tree ends its tenure

After gracing the university’s north-south pathway for decades, a London plane tree was cut down due to interior decay and the resulting safety risk. Removal of the deciduous giant required a team of highly-experienced arborists.

Beak speak 

How did songbirds start singing? Neuroscientists are reshaping our understanding of speech—pinpointing the cells and molecules that built it and what happens in the brain when we learn a new word, chirp, or squeal.

New portrait of five trailblazing women scientists from Rockefeller’s past is unveiled

With a new portrait by artist Brenda Zlamany, installed over the fireplace in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Reception Hall, the likenesses of scientists Marie Daly, Rebecca Lancefield, Louise Pearce, Gertrude Perlmann, and Florence Sabin have joined the university’s art collection.

Philanthropy 2.0 

Private investments are making it possible to reimagine 21st-century bioscience. Cori Bargmann envisions a future with opportunity for researchers everywhere.

A third vaccine dose may increase protection from Omicron

The booster appears to galvanize memory B cells into producing potent and versatile antibodies that neutralize both the original virus and its many variants.

Rockefeller tops international university ranking in measure of top cited publications

In the U-Multirank rating system for higher education institutions, Rockefeller placed first in a measure of impact based on citations.

40 young scientists receive Ph.D.s at Rockefeller’s 64th convocation

With this week’s ceremony, the first in-person convocation since the start of the pandemic, Rockefeller has granted doctor of philosophy degrees in bioscience to 1,395 students. In addition, Anthony S. Fauci, Katalin Karikó, and Lulu C. Wang received honorary doctor of science degrees.

How intricate patterns arise in developing tissues

In developing bird skin, immature cells move around and form intricate patterns. Scientists are zeroing in on the mechanical forces guiding the process.

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Building a human ‘pangenome’ to capture global genomic diversity

The human reference genome, the most widely used resource in human genetics, is getting a major update.

Hundreds of new drug targets to combat tuberculosis

The study highlights genes that, when silenced, render Mycobacterium tuberculosis vulnerable to antibiotics, and identifies existing drugs that may be effective against one prominent strain.

One protein's surprising partnership with single-stranded DNA

Linker histone H1 appears capable of distinguishing between single-stranded and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that its role in maintaining our genomes extends far beyond that of keeping chromosomes compact.

A synthetic antibiotic may help turn the tide against drug-resistant bacteria

The compound attacks MRSA, C. diff, and several other deadly pathogens. Its discovery demonstrates the power of combining computational biology, genetic sequencing, and synthetic chemistry to study bacterial evolution.

The genetic underpinnings of severe staph infections

A mutated gene may explain why some Staphylococcus aureus infections turn lethal, a finding with significant implications for people living with 5p- syndrome.

Titia de Lange elected to the Royal Society

She receives the honor for elucidating mechanisms of telomere protection and genome maintenance.

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Antibody therapy controls HIV for months in new clinical trial

Unlike conventional antiretroviral drugs, treatment with broadly neutralizing antibodies does not rely on vigilant daily dosing and could potentially reduce the body’s reservoir of latent viruses.

Shixin Liu, expert in single-molecule studies of biological machines, is promoted to associate professor

Liu’s pioneering research on nano-scale molecular events is furthering our knowledge of how DNA replication and gene expression are regulated.

Kivanç Birsoy, expert on cancer cell metabolism, is promoted to associate professor 

Birsoy's groundbreaking research has highlighted key nutrients that cancer cells need to survive, while shedding light on debilitating mitochondrial diseases and rare genetic disorders.

Richard P. Lifton to be honored with 2023 Kober Medal

Lifton, who pioneered the use of genomics to identify the basis for diseases, is recognized for a lifetime of contributions in science and mentorship.

How a narrow-spectrum antibiotic takes aim at C. diff

A new study reveals how the drug fidaxomicin selectively targets a dangerous pathogen without causing harm to beneficial bacteria. The findings could inform the development of new narrow-spectrum antibiotics for treating other types of infection.

The human genome is, at long last, complete

Even after 20 years of upgrades, eight percent of the human genome was still left unsequenced and unstudied. Until now.

The Board of Trustees has eight new members

With a breadth and depth of experience across academia, the pharmaceutical industry, technology, healthcare, and the financial sector, this latest cohort of trustees brings new skill sets and perspectives to the community.

How bacteria "self-vaccinate" against viral invaders

In studying how bacteria respond to viral infection, scientists are learning that their defense strategies cooperate in ways reminiscent of the elaborate immune systems of animals.
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