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New design may boost potency of monoclonal antibodies against COVID

In animal experiments, the structurally altered antibodies activated the immune system more effectively than those currently used in the clinic. They also proved to be more protective against the virus.

A new interdisciplinary center, devoted to the neuroscience of social behavior, has been launched with a $25 million gift

A major gift from Michael and Vikki Price marks the launch of an integrated effort to map and analyze the biological underpinnings of sociality and in turn better understand related disorders such as autism, depression, and schizophrenia.

Radiotherapy may explain why childhood cancer survivors often develop metabolic disease

Radiation therapy to treat childhood cancer may damage adipose tissue, causing diabetes and coronary heart disease decades later.

Scientists discover how mitochondria import antioxidants

The finding offers researchers a direct way to investigate oxidative stress and its damaging effects in aging, cancer and other diseases.

How mice miss the exit 

Thanks to the existence of forgetful mice, scientists have gained clues into the process by which the brain forms short-term memories. They were even able to restore a mouse’s memory by genetic manipulation.

How foodborne diseases protect the gut's nervous system

Prior infections appear to shield enteric neurons, preventing these key components of the body's "second brain" from dying off when future pathogens strike.

Dopamine’s many roles, explained

Studying fruit flies, researchers ask how a single brain chemical can orchestrate diverse functions such as learning, motivation and movement.

Heavy rainfall from Hurricane Ida tests flood control measures installed in 2012

The September storm brought record rainfall which quickly overwhelmed drainage systems on campus and throughout the city. But the event did not cause widespread damage on campus thanks to improvements made nine years ago.

This fly likes its fruit fresh 

Farmers have a new enemy, a species of fruit fly that lays eggs in ripe produce. To help curtail the problem, scientists are getting to the bottom of how this trait arose in the course of evolution.

Three Rockefeller researchers are elected to the National Academy of Medicine

Mary E. Hatten, Charles M. Rice, and Leslie B. Vosshall are three of 100 new members elected to the academy today.

Noninfectious versions of SARS-CoV-2 provide powerful research tools

The new experimental system will facilitate efforts to study different coronavirus variants and develop new drugs for
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  • A mission to end metastasis 

    Not all cancer cells are killers. One lab is focusing its energy on only those that enable tumors to spread—and it may have found their kryptonite.

    Small molecule may prevent metastasis in colorectal cancer

    The compound works by hindering a key pathway that cancer cells rely upon to hoard energy, and is already undergoing clinical trials.


    Study detects origins of Huntington's disease in two-week-old human embryos

    The findings shed new light on the root causes of this disease, which leads to the degeneration of neurons in midlife.

    Seth A. Darst honored with Gregori Aminoff Prize

    Darst receives the honor for pioneering research on RNA polymerase, the molecular machine that transcribes RNA from DNA. His work is leading to new knowledge about the transcription process, as well as to insights enabling development of urgent antibiotic and antiviral treatments.

    Katalin Karikó named the 2022 recipient of the Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

    Katalin Karikó discovered how to keep synthetic RNA from activating the innate immune system, paving the way for RNA vaccines including two for SARS-CoV-2.

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    Novel method for trapping HIV inside its host may give rise to new antivirals

    Human cells can be coaxed into preventing certain enveloped viruses (including HIV, Ebola, and parainfluenza) from escaping their membranes in the lab, a finding that could lead to novel treatments for many viral diseases.

    Linker histones tune the length and shape of chromosomes

    A new study finds that proteins known as linker histones control the complex coiling process that determines whether DNA will wind into long and thin chromosomes, made up of many small loops, or short and thick chromosomes with fewer large loops.

    Hospital hallway installation honors 11 women scientists at Rockefeller

    Uncovering the chemical composition of histones and innovating addiction treatment are only two of the accomplishments of the women scientists featured in a new photographic display.

    A refurbished pharmacy supports research trials at Rockefeller

    A new pharmacy with clean room and other features makes it possible for pharmacists to prepare highly specialized compounds and sterile injectable drugs for use in clinical research.

    Three Rockefeller researchers are named HHMI investigators

    Daniel Kronauer, who studies evolution in insect societies, Daniel Mucida, who examines mucosal immunology, and Vanessa Ruta, who investigates neural circuits that underlie innate and learned behaviors, are among 33 scientists nationwide to receive this designation.

    Rockefeller leads global university ranking in measure of top cited publications

    An international ranking of research institutions by U-Multirank placed Rockefeller first in a measure of its impact based on citations.

    Rockefeller postdoc, Luka Mesin, named a Blavatnik Regional Award Finalist

    Mesin, a member of the Victora Lab, receives the honor for developing novel techniques to better understand how B cells in the immune system mature and evolve to create antibodies to fight off pathogens.

    Could future coronavirus variants fully dodge our immune system?

    Studying dozens of naturally occurring and laboratory-selected mutations in SARS-CoV-2, researchers found that the virus will need to pull off a genetic feat to become fully resistant to antibodies.

    Rockefeller faculty member, Leslie B. Vosshall, named vice president and chief scientific officer of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

    Vosshall will join the leadership team at HHMI, a major philanthropy that supports basic biomedical scientists and educators.

    Pamela Björkman wins the 2021 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

    Pamela J. Björkman, who discovered key aspects of the immune system that are helping to direct better treatment for infection from viruses and other diseases, will receive the prize in a virtual ceremony hosted by Rockefeller on September 30.

    Frames of Mind 

    We think of brains as computers—stimulus in, action out. But they’re far more finicky than any iMac. Easily swayed by underlying internal states such as hunger, aggression, or arousal, our neurons are capable of incredible flexibility. For neuroscientists, it’s yet another wrinkle in understandin...

    Rockefeller saliva test for COVID-19 outperforms commercial swab tests

    The DRUL saliva assay is safer, more comfortable, and less expensive than comparable COVID screening tools. Now a new study demonstrates that it is at least as sensitive as swab tests, too.

    Study reveals how ribosomes are assembled in human cells

    Three-dimensional images of human small ribosomal subunits offer the most detailed explanation for how the cell's protein-making machines are assembled.

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    Missing immune molecule may explain why some HPV patients sprout giant horn-like growths

    Scientists identified a mutation that affects one’s reaction to HPV by decreasing the production of CD28, a vital molecule within the immune system.