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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

University updates policy on storm-related closures

Beginning this winter, Rockefeller will close during days that New York City public schools close due to weather emergencies.

Embryos remember the chemicals that they encounter

A new study shows that embryonic cells retain a memory of the chemical signals to which they are exposed. Without these memories, cells fail organize into distinct tissue types.

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Enzyme structure helps to explain how protein factories are constructed

Researchers characterized the structure of Mdn1, an enzyme key to making ribosomes.

Searching in soil, scientists find a new way to combat tuberculosis

Analyzing soil samples from across the country, researchers have identified an antibiotic capable of treating strains of tuberculosis that do not respond to existing therapies.

More than 750 people visit campus during Open House New York

Rockefeller hosts historical and architectural tours as part of Open House New York, a citywide festival that puts on display buildings and spaces not usually open to the public.

This instrument will make it possible to build (almost) any other

The Precision Instrumentation Technologies facility has been outfitted with a CNC milling machine, a high-performance instrument that will help Rockefeller engineers custom-make scientific devices.

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New approach to cancer immunotherapy overcomes toxicity hurdle

Using a unique mouse model, Rockefeller scientists have developed a new strategy in cancer immunotherapy that is more safe and effective than other treatments of its kind.

To see what’s right in front of you, your brain may need some rewiring

As you encounter new experiences and form new memories, your brain changes. Now, researchers show that some of these change occur in a brain region devoted to visual perception.

Herbert Gibbs, who brightened Rockefeller’s campus for 45 years, dies at age 74

A janitor and porter, “Mister Gibbs” was known for his infectious smile and his dedication to the university community.

Rockefeller welcomes new librarian, Matthew V. Covey

Covey is bringing an inside-out approach to the library’s work, with librarians visiting scientists in their labs to help with everything from training sessions to data management.

In tiny worms, researchers find spiking neurons—and clues about brain computation

Studying neurons in C. elegans, researchers made a surprising discovery: these roundworms, like most animals, process information using a digital, electric code.

C. David Allis accepts Lasker Award for insights into gene regulation

During the time-honored Lasker Award ceremony, Allis outlined the five-decade-long history of research on histones and their modification.

Scientists investigate how DEET confuses countless critters

DEET, a chemical in bug sprays, affects the behavior of highly diverse organisms—but how it works remains unclear. New research in C. elegans shows that the compound exploits unique receptors and neurons to interfere with the animals’ response to odors.

In clinical trials, new antibody therapy controls HIV for months after treatment

A new clinical trial shows that broadly neutralizing antibodies can suppress HIV for up to four months, far longer than currently available drugs.

Study of protein “trafficker” provides insight into autism and other brain disorders

Researchers have discovered that the protein ASTN2 shuttles receptors away from the surface of neurons, a process that facilitates efficient brain activity.

Jennifer Doudna to receive the 2018 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Doudna, a pioneer in the study of RNA, will be given the prize during a ceremony on the Rockefeller campus on Tuesday, October 2.

C. David Allis wins 2018 Lasker Award for discovery of new mechanisms regulating gene expression

Allis receives the nation's top science award for research on epigenetic gene regulation and its role in disease.

New campus caterer to focus on fresh food, variety, and sustainability

Committed to innovative cuisine, Great Performances will be introducing changes over the next weeks and months as they get to know Rockefeller tastes and culture.

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New gene-engineering technique will help scientists study the immune system

Using gene editing technology, researchers have developed a new way to study B cell activation in mice. This technique makes research more efficient, and has the potential to improve our understanding of immune responses in humans.

Third Rockefeller cryo-EM to help tame poorly behaved proteins

With a new transmission cryo-electron microscope, Rockefeller researchers will be prepared to sleuth out complicated protein structures in increasingly sophisticated ways.

Ant-y social: study of clonal raider ants reveals the evolutionary benefits of group living

A new study in ants demonstrates that living in groups leads to improved fitness. The researchers show that, in larger groups, ants take on specialized roles and colony stability increases.

New faculty member studies the architecture of the genome

Risca explores the three-dimensional structures that organize and support DNA, and the biochemical rules that govern the organization of the genome. She will join Rockefeller as an assistant professor on January 2, 2019.

Structure of ion channel reveals how insects smell their way around the world

Researchers describe, for the first time, the structure of a smell-receptor protein common among insects. Its inner architecture illuminates how insects evolved to detect an amazing diversity of odors.

Researchers uncover molecular mechanisms of rare skin disease

Scientists describe a group of proteins that protect cells from a subtype of human papilloma virus. They also outline genetic mutations that make this virus unusually harmful in people with epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a rare skin condition.

Lack of a single molecule may indicate severe and treatment-resistant depression

Researchers find that a deficiency of acetyl-L-carnitine is associated with a particular subtype of depression. Individuals with very low levels of this molecule often have highly severe symptoms and don’t respond to traditional antidepressants.

Ant study sheds light on the evolution of workers and queens

A new study in ants identifies a peptide that plays an important role in regulating reproduction. This research illuminates a potential trajectory for the evolution of distinct social castes—workers and queens.

Giant neurons in the brain may play similarly giant role in awareness and cognition

Scientists find that certain neurons release nitric oxide onto nearby blood vessels, and potentially use this mechanism to control awareness in the brain.

Erich Jarvis receives grant from W.M. Keck foundation

With a new grant from the W.M. Keck foundation, the Jarvis Lab will further their research on the genes and neural circuits involved in speech production.

Studies reveal possible origin of human speech

Scientists have long debated the evolutionary origins of human speech. New research reveals neural circuits in the brains of monkeys that may represent the source of our unique speech capabilities.

Scientists discover a mechanism of drug resistance in breast and ovarian cancer

A new study helps explain why certain cancers don't respond to treatment, and offers hope for overcoming this deadly resistance.

New faculty member studies the mechanics of development, challenging long-held assumptions

Earlier this month, developmental biologist Amy Shyer joined the Rockefeller community as an assistant professor. Shyer combines mechanical and molecular perspectives to better understand how patterns form and how tissues develop.

Three Rockefeller scientists promoted to professor

Sean Brady, Winrich Freiwald, and Luciano Marraffini have been promoted to professor. Respectively, these scientists have characterized previously unknown small molecules, provided insight into how the brain processes faces, and revolutionized gene editing.

Rockefeller University Press launches new science journal with the publishing arms of EMBO and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Life Science Alliance is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal with a streamlined manuscript submission and review process.

Deep in the fly brain, a clue to how evolution changes minds

A new study sheds light on the mysterious ways in which evolution may tweak the brain to shape behavior. It started with a close look at two Drosophila species and their mating maneuvers.

David Rockefeller Fellowship awarded to graduate student Krithika Venkataraman

Venkataraman has been recognized for her study of the hormonal triggers that lead female mosquitoes to toggle between hunting for blood and spawning eggs.

A new tactic for starving tumors

Scientists have found a metabolic particularity in tumor cells lacking oxygen. The discovery might point to new drugs to target the most difficult-to-treat spots within a tumor.

Scientists solve the case of the missing subplate, with wide implications for brain science

A new study shows that a group of neurons, previously thought to die in the course of development, in fact become incorporated into the brain’s cortex. This research has implications for understanding—and possibly treating—several brain disorders.

Bacterial art, sheep brains, and a fish race: highlights from our Science Saturday festival

The annual event invites children to campus for an unforgettable day of hands-on experiments and interactive learning.

30 young scientists receive Ph.D.s at Rockefeller’s 60th convocation

Since its first convocation, Rockefeller has granted doctor of philosophy degrees in bioscience to more than 1,260 students, including today’s graduates.

Troves from a search for new biomarkers: blood-borne RNA

Scientists have found a new way to trawl blood samples for snippets of RNA released by tumors or diseased organs. The method might eventually help doctors diagnose and track a wide range of medical conditions.

William E. Ford elected Chair of The Rockefeller University Board

Ford succeeds Russell L. Carson, who is retiring after leading the Board for the past 13 years.

Rockefeller tops global university ranking in measures of research excellence and patents

The university ranks first in two major categories in a survey of more than 1600 institutions.

Drowsy worms offer new insights into the neuroscience of sleep

Scientists studying worms have discovered a group of cells that help the body transition from wakefulness to slumber.

A. James Hudspeth to receive Kavli Prize in Neuroscience

Hudspeth is receiving the honor for pioneering work on the molecular and neural mechanisms of hearing.

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Genetic mutation identified as culprit in rare infectious disease

Researchers have uncovered the genetic factors that make some people susceptible to Whipple's disease, an intestinal inflammatory disorder that causes diarrhea, pain, and weight loss.

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New molecular views of how neurons pace their signals

Detailed structural images reveal how an ion channel helps curtail a neuron’s firing. The work has relevance for diseases in which this molecule malfunctions.

A first look at the earliest decisions that shape a human embryo

For the first time, scientists have shown that a small cluster of cells in the human embryo dictates the fate of other embryonic cells. The discovery of this developmental “organizer” could advance research into many human diseases, and it suggests we have more in common with birds than meets the...

Gaby Maimon and Luciano Marraffini are named HHMI investigators

Maimon, who studies cognition and decision-making, and Marraffini, who studies the bacterial defense system CRISPR-Cas, are among 19 scientists nationwide to receive this designation.

Sohail Tavazoie promoted to professor

Sohail Tavazoie, a physician-scientist who studies the genes that regulate a tumor’s ability to metastasize, has been promoted to professor.

Rockefeller takes first place in global ranking of scientific impact

Out of over 900 universities from 55 different countries, Rockefeller tops a survey measuring the impact of university research publications, scoring the highest percentage of frequently cited scientific publications.

A new way to watch brain activity in action

A new imaging tool makes it possible to track the firing of millions of brain cells in mice while the animals move about as normal. The method could help shed new light onto the neural processes that create behavior.

Jeffrey V. Ravetch to receive 2018 Robert Koch Award

Ravetch receives the award for his groundbreaking work analyzing the immune system’s antibody response. He has worked for decades on the Fc fragment of the antibody molecule and its binding partners, known as Fc receptors.

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New method allows scientists to study how HIV persists

Scientists have developed a new strategy to study the cells that host hidden reserves of dormant HIV, a step that may lead to new treatments that go beyond controlling the infection and instead aim to eradicate the virus entirely.

Small molecule from Kapoor lab is accepted as first Bridge Medicines drug candidate

A chemical inhibitor targeting basal cell carcinoma, originating from Tarun Kapoor’s lab, is graduating from the Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute into Bridge Medicines.

From infection-dodging stem cells, new tactics for research on viral disease

Among other superpowers, stem cells have a knack for fending off viruses like dengue and zika. Scientists have gained new insight into these curious defense strategies—knowledge they say could fuel the development of drugs against a range of diseases.

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Structural studies help explain how cancer cells resist chemotherapy

New research sheds light on how some cancer cells use molecular pumps to expel chemotherapy drugs before they have a chance to work.

Astrophysicist Kip Thorne to receive Rockefeller’s 2018 science writing prize

Thorne is recognized for his deft explanations that have drawn readers into the space-, time-, and mind-bending realm of Einstein’s ideas. The prize, which honors scientists as inspirational authors, will be presented on April 17.

What happens to a dying cell’s corpse? New findings illuminate an old problem

Scientists have discovered a curious way for cells to die. In studying it, they are learning about how remnants of diseased cells are normally chewed up and removed.

Scientists map the portal to the cell’s nucleus

The gateway to cellular headquarters has 552 components. A new map that shows how all these pieces fit together could help scientists study numerous diseases.

Scientists caution that a rare childhood liver cancer can spread to the brain

A new report details three cases of secondary brain tumors in people with fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. The researchers say imaging tests could improve treatment for patients whose cancer spreads to the brain from the liver.