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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
!
Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

When ant colonies get bigger, new foraging behavior emerges

By increasing the size of ant colonies bit by bit, scientists identified the mechanism responsible for the evolution of mass raiding behavior.

How cells draw on memories of past inflammation to respond to new threats

A new study uncovers a near-universal mechanism behind this phenomenon, known as inflammatory memory.

New Pearl Meister Greengard Prize exhibit celebrates the accomplishments of women scientists

The installation located in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Lounge features the 22 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize awardees.

Hunting for TB's most vulnerable genes

Not every gene that's essential in tuberculosis is also vulnerable to attack. A new study ranks essential genes by vulnerability, allowing researchers to better prioritize future drug targets.

Putting the brakes on immune reactions

Helper T cells may play a dual role in the immune system, both encouraging and suppressing the process by which B cells mature.

Identifying the spark of desire in fruit flies

In Drosophila’s neural circuitry for courtship, researchers discover a configuration that enables a male fruit fly to be persistent, yet flexible in his pursuit of a female.

Purnell Choppin, pioneering virologist, has died

Purnell Choppin, a physician, virologist, and scientific administrator who performed pioneering research on viruses at The Rockefeller University and later exerted a powerful influence on biomedical research as president of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, has died at the age of 91.

Scientists discover a new class of neurons for remembering faces

Our brains have sensory cells, which process the faces that we see, and memory cells dedicated to storing data from person encounters. But until now, a hybrid neuron capable of linking vision to memory—and explaining how we recall familiar faces—remained elusive.

Robert G. Roeder named the 2021 Kyoto Prize laureate in basic sciences

Roeder, a pioneer in the field of gene regulation and expression, is being honored for revealing the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation.

Convocation 2021 caps a year like no other

For Rockefeller’s class of 2021, it has been a year with both challenges and accomplishments.

Toward the first drug to treat a rare, lethal liver cancer

After scouring more than 5,000 compounds, scientists have identified several new classes of therapeutics that may help treat fibrolamellar carcinoma.

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A missing antibody molecule may indicate when dengue will become deadly

The antibody's altered structure helps explain an enduring mystery of dengue—why only a fraction of those infected will develop severe disease.

How CRISPR promotes antibiotic resistance in bacteria

Whenever a cell uses CRISPR to defend itself, there's a chance of mutations creeping into its genetic code. Some of these mutations are harmless; others kill the cell. But fortuitous mutations can occasionally render major human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, antibiotic resistant.

Rockefeller leads an international ranking of research impact

According to this year’s CWTS Leiden Ranking of over 1200 universities from 69 countries, Rockefeller has the highest proportion of frequently cited scientific publications.

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Vaccines charge up natural immunity against SARS-CoV-2

Vaccination enhances antibodies in people who have had COVID, likely giving them protection even from the new variants.

New findings to boost IVF success rates

New research casts doubt on a genetic test used to screen would-be embryos for IVF implantation. The findings suggests that these embryos can develop into healthy babies regardless of whether or not they’ve been flagged as defective by the test.

Scientists release error-free genomes of 25 animals—with another 70,000 coming up

Scientists have launched an ambitious effort to produce high-quality reference genomes for all vertebrate species, from mammals to birds and reptiles. The result could be discoveries with implications for animal conservation as well as human health and disease.

A case for simplifying gene nomenclature across different organisms

Scientists call it oxytocin in humans, isotocin in fish, mesotocin in birds, and valitocin in sharks. But according to a new study, it’s all the same hormone—and high time we settled on just one name.


New Caspary exhibit honors 58 Rockefeller award winners, past and present

Redesigning the exhibit provided an opportunity to consider how to best honor and commemorate Rockefeller award winners. Discussions with university leadership and an ad-hoc faculty committee steered the process and led to a broadening of the criteria for inclusion.

Evolutionary biologist and ornithologist Richard Prum receives the 2021 Lewis Thomas Prize

The author of The Evolution of Beauty was presented with Rockefeller’s science writing award, which honors scientists as inspirational authors.

Study of “breakthrough” cases suggests COVID testing may be here to stay

Two new cases helped scientists confirm what many have come to suspect: that people can get infected by SARS-CoV-2 variants even after successful vaccination. The findings suggest continued testing may be needed to prevent future outbreaks in a post-vaccine world. <...

Inside the protein channel that keeps bacteria alive

A novel method for studying how one crucial membrane protein functions may pave the way for a new kind of broad-spectrum antibiotic.

Brain disease transmitted by tick bites may be treatable

The virus that causes tick-borne encephalitis appears to trick the immune system, misdirecting it into producing inferior antibodies. But new research shows some people produce more potent antibodies, providing hope for treatment.

Immunologist Katharine Hsu is named director of the Tri-Institutional M.D.-Ph.D. program

The joint program between Weill Cornell Medicine, The Rockefeller University, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will be lead by Hsu, an accomplished physician-scientist who specializes in immunology research and treatment of blood cancers.

Paul Cohen, expert on fat, is promoted to associate professor

Cohen, a physician-scientist exploring obesity and metabolic disease, has conducted groundbreaking research on the complex inner workings of fat tissue.

Immunologist Daniel Mucida promoted to professor

A pioneer in the field of mucosal immunology, Mucida is unlocking the secrets of the digestive system and answering fundamental questions about the origins of human disease.

Mary Jeanne Kreek, pioneer in studies of addiction, has died

Kreek conducted landmark studies that led to the establishment of methadone as a treatment for heroin addiction. Her work not only yielded new treatments for addiction disorders, but also influenced societal attitudes toward them. She was 84.

Paula Volent is named chief investment officer

The university has named its next vice president and chief investment officer. Volent, who for decades oversaw investments at Bowdoin College, will assume stewardship of Rockefeller's endowment in August.

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How one patient’s rare mutation helped solve a mycobacterial mystery

The discovery may explain why some patients suffer more severe reactions than others—putting us one step closer to understanding how our DNA influences our susceptibility to a wide range of infectious diseases.

Financial crashes, pandemics, Texas snow: How math could predict "black swan" events

Statistical modeling may one day help scientists anticipate and manage a wide range of extreme occurrences, according to a new study.

An old antibiotic may combat drug-resistant tuberculosis

Drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis bacteria affect half a million people a year. A compound first discovered in the 1980s may be able to help.

Why male mosquitoes leave humans alone

Unlike their female counterparts, male mosquitoes have no desire to bite us. But the hardware for host-seeking is hidden in the male mosquito brain, locked behind a simple genetic switch. 

This fish is about to flip 

An elaborate set of zebrafish experiments is shining light on one of neuroscience’s greatest enigmas: How brains make decisions. By tracking neural activity, scientists can now predict a fish’s next move before it happens.

Rockefeller grants commercial license for the development of monoclonal antibodies for treatment of COVID-19

The treatment, a combination of two antibodies, has been shown highly capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 in preclinical studies. Researchers hope it will give countries around the world, including developing countries, a way to control the rampant disease.

COVID-19 vaccines may need regular updates for emerging variants

Lab experiments suggest that the new strains reported in Britain, South Africa, and Brazil may blunt the potency of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines. This could mean that the vaccines will need updates as the virus mutates.

Neurophysiologist Victor Wilson, 92, has died

Victor Wilson, a neurophysiologist who traced the intricate neural mechanisms that govern our balance and posture, died on January 20 at the age of 92.

Synthetic “micro lungs” could take COVID-19 research to the next level

Scientists have developed stem-cell technology to mass-produce tissue cultures resembling our breathing organs. These tissues offer a powerful model in which to study how SARS-CoV-2 wreaks havoc in the lungs and to screen for new drugs.

The immune system mounts a lasting defense after recovery from COVID-19

The study participants continued to improve their antibodies months after initial infection, potentially due to exposure to remnants of the virus hidden in the gut.

The blood may hold clues to some of COVID-19’s most mysterious symptoms

COVID-19 causes a host of diverse complications, from lung inflammation to blood clots, heart failure, and brain fog. A team of scientists believes these attributes may have a single culprit—and that findings from research on Alzheimer’s disease might give them a leg up in finding it.

Rockefeller begins testing of new COVID-19 antibody drug in people

Patients in the clinical trial will receive two highly potent antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 discovered at the university. Designed to prevent people with early COVID-19 from developing severe disease, the treatment is urgently needed as hospitals continue to be inundated by repeated surges of inf...

What Darwin never guessed 

Scientists have found that evolution isn’t always a one-way street toward specialization.

Scientists capture the moving parts of the portal to the cell’s nucleus

The proteins of the nuclear pore complex flip-flop rapidly between two orientations as they let cargo through.

Study of 50,000 people finds brown fat may protect against many diseases

People with brown fat tissue tend to burn calories more quickly, but do they also enjoy better health? Now the largest study of its kind shows that brown fat is indeed linked to reduced risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and several other conditions.

Llamas immune to coronavirus, what zebrafish are thinking, and other memorable science stories of 2020 

This year's scientific endeavors included multiple attacks on SARS-CoV-2—and a lot more. Here are the most memorable science stories to come out of Rockefeller labs, from cracking the code behind specific skin cancer subtypes to understanding what goes on inside a fish brain.

As COVID-19 vaccines emerge, the search for antiviral drugs continues

Scientists are digging through drug libraries of 430,000 compounds, in pursuit of an antiviral drug that can stop the novel coronavirus in its tracks.

A mediocre mutator 

Scientists developed a method to safely examine the ability of SARS-CoV-2 to escape future drugs or vaccines by mutating. Their initial results are reassuring.

Royalty Pharma and Pablo and Almudena Legorreta Support Development of Antibody-Based COVID-19 Therapy at The Rockefeller University

Royalty Pharma and The Rockefeller University announced generous gifts totaling $5,760,000 from Royalty Pharma and Pablo and Almudena Legorreta.

Scientists map the network of SARS-CoV-2’s helpers inside human cells

The virus must hijack a more than a hundred human proteins to replicate inside a cell. One of them stands out because it is an absolute requirement for infection by four different coronaviruses as well as by viruses that cause Zika, yellow fever, and other diseases.

Charles M. Rice formally receives 2020 Nobel Prize in a virtual ceremony

Rice was honored for research that contributed to a cure for hepatitis C. He accepted the Nobel medal and diploma at the Swedish Consulate in New York City.

Marina Caskey is promoted to professor of clinical investigation

Caskey, a clinician in the lab of Michel Nussenzweig, has spent the last decade working on clinical studies of experimental immune-based vaccines and therapies.

New five-year fundraising campaign has already received $200 million in gifts

The $675 million Campaign for the Convergence of Science and Medicine, launched July 1, 2019, aims to fulfill the priorities identified in the university’s 2020-2024 strategic plan.

What bats can teach us about COVID-19

Unlike most humans, bats are naturally resistant to coronavirus infection. Researchers are now searching their genomes for clues that might explain why SARS-CoV-2 can cause devastating disease in our own species.

Telomere shortening protects against cancer

Researchers have found the first evidence that telomere shortening is not just a sign of aging, but a key component of the body's cancer prevention system.

Some cells are multilingual 

Experiments in zebrafish are shining light onto a poorly understood process in which cells communicate mechanically, by pushing and pulling on each other.

Conservation of resources is hardwired into the genetic code

A study of marine microbes reveals that conservation of nutrients is a fundamental property of cells in all living organisms, from plants to humans.

New atlas reveals the journey of human cells throughout development

The largest map of gene expression in over 4 million human cells charts the dynamic path to forming different organs.

Science fights back 

Researchers have launched a tremendous race to understand the new virus and attack it from every angle. How they work and collaborate might never again be the same.

Primordial shapeshifters 

Only in sci-fi movies can a living cell be created from scratch. But a recent discovery suggests that this tantalizing feat might one day become possible in the real world.

How the immune system deals with the gut's plethora of microbes

New research suggests that our immune system may play an active role in shaping the digestive-tract flora, which is tightly linked to health and disease.

How cells use mechanical tension sensors to interact with their environment

In a painstaking experiment, scientists suspended a single protein filament between two microscopic beads. Their results have shed light on an elusive process in which cells receive and respond to mechanical cues.