Skip to main content
!
Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
!
Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
!
Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

Publications search

Found 37003 matches. Displaying 1-10
Dhaouadi S, Bouchami O, Soufi L, Dhaouadi F, Chaari S, Bouglita W, Cherif A, de Lencastre H, Elandoulsi RB, Miragaia M
Show All Authors

Frequent dissemination and carriage of an SCC mec-mecC hybrid in methicillin-resistant Mammaliicoccus sciuri in farm animals from Tunisia

JOURNAL OF GLOBAL ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE 2022 DEC; 31(?):228-235
Objectives: In this study, we aimed to assess the extent of dissemination of methicillin-resistant Mammaliicoccus sciuri in animal farms in Tunisia and evaluate the distribution of virulence and methicillin resistance genes in the M. sciuri population.Methods: Staphylococci and mammaliicocci isolated from unhealthy animals and healthy humans from adjacent farms in Tunisia were characterized for antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm formation, agglutination, and hemolysis abilities. Mammaliicoccus sciuri relatedness and content in antibiotic resistance and virulence genes were analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS).Results: Mammaliicoccus sciuri was the most prevalent species (46.2%), showing the highest resistance rates to fusidic acid (94.6%), oxacillin (73%), penicillin (40.5%), clindamycin (37%), ciprofloxacin (27%), and cefoxitin (24.3%). Some isolates carried genes encoding resistance to nine different antibiotic classes. mecA was found in 35% of M. sciuri and mecC in 16.2%. All isolates carrying mecC were of S. sciuri subspecies carnaticus and carried the hybrid element SCC mec-mecC. Mammaliicoccus sciuri were able to produce strong biofilm (27%) and have clumping ability (16%). Additionally, they carried genes for capsule production ( cap8 , 100%), iron-regulated surface determinants ( isdE , 24%; isdG , 3%), and virulence regulation ( clpC and clpP , 100%). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis showed that 17 M. sciuri cross-transmission events probably occurred between different animal species and farms. Moreover, SCC mec was estimated to have been acquired five times by S. sciuri subsp. carnaticus.Conclusion: Multidrug resistant and pathogenic M. sciuri were frequently disseminated between different animal species within the farm environment. mecA and mecC can be disseminated by both frequent acquisition of the SCC mec element and clonal dissemination.(c) 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of International Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ )
Brown JA, Sanidad KZ, Lucotti S, Lieber CM, Cox RM, Ananthanarayanan A, Basu S, Chen J, Shan MR, Amir M, Schmidt F, Weisblum Y, Cioffi M, Li TT, Rowdo FM, Martin ML, Guo CJ, Lyssiotis C, Layden BT, Dannenberg AJ, Bieniasz PD, Lee B, Inohara N, Matei I, Plemper RK, Zeng MY
Show All Authors

Gut microbiota-derived metabolites confer protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection

GUT MICROBES 2022 DEC 31; 14(1):? Article 2105609
The gut microbiome is intricately coupled with immune regulation and metabolism, but its role in Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is not fully understood. Severe and fatal COVID-19 is characterized by poor anti-viral immunity and hypercoagulation, particularly in males. Here, we define multiple pathways by which the gut microbiome protects mammalian hosts from SARS-CoV-2 intranasal infection, both locally and systemically, via production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs reduced viral burdens in the airways and intestines by downregulating the SARS-CoV-2 entry receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), and enhancing adaptive immunity via GPR41 and 43 in male animals. We further identify a novel role for the gut microbiome in regulating systemic coagulation response by limiting megakaryocyte proliferation and platelet turnover via the Sh2b3-Mpl axis. Taken together, our findings have unraveled novel functions of SCFAs and fiber-fermenting gut bacteria to dampen viral entry and hypercoagulation and promote adaptive antiviral immunity.
Mansisidor AR, Risca VI
Show All Authors

Chromatin accessibility: methods, mechanisms, and biological insights

NUCLEUS 2022 DEC 31; 13(1):236-276
Access to DNA is a prerequisite to the execution of essential cellular processes that include transcription, replication, chromosomal segregation, and DNA repair. How the proteins that regulate these processes function in the context of chromatin and its dynamic architectures is an intensive field of study. Over the past decade, genome-wide assays and new imaging approaches have enabled a greater understanding of how access to the genome is regulated by nucleosomes and associated proteins. Additional mechanisms that may control DNA accessibility in vivo include chromatin compaction and phase separation - processes that are beginning to be understood. Here, we review the ongoing development of accessibility measurements, we summarize the different molecular and structural mechanisms that shape the accessibility landscape, and we detail the many important biological functions that are linked to chromatin accessibility.
Lee UJ, Mortola EN, Kim EJ, Long MY
Show All Authors

Evolution and maintenance of phenotypic plasticity

BIOSYSTEMS 2022 DEC; 222(?):? Article 104791
We introduce a novel framework for exploring the evolutionary consequences of phenotypic plasticity (adaptive and non-adaptive) integrating both genic and epigenetic effects on phenotype via stochastic differential equations and in-silico selection. In accordance with the most significant results derived from prior models, we demonstrate how plasticity is differentially favored when subjected to small vs large environmental shifts, how plasticity is transiently favorable while accommodating a new environment, and how plasticity decreases during epochs where the environment remains stable (canalization). In contrast to these models, however, by allowing the same phenotypic value to be produced via two different paths, i.e. deterministic, genic, vs stochastic, epigenetic mechanisms, we demonstrate when genic contributions alone cannot produce an optimal phenotype, plastic, epigenetic contributions will instead fully accommodate new environments, allowing for both adaptive and non-adaptive plasticity to evolve. Furthermore, we show that while rates of phenotypic accommodation are relatively constant under a wide range of selective conditions, selection will favor the most efficient route to adaptation: deterministic, genic response, or stochastic, plastic response. As a result, plasticity may evolve or canalization may occur within a given epoch depending on the relative mutation rate of genic and epigenetic contributions to phenotype, highlighting the importance of genetic conflict on the evolution of plasticity.
Canesso MCC, Moreira TG, Faria AMC
Show All Authors

Compartmentalization of gut immune responses: Mucosal niches and lymph node peculiarities

IMMUNOLOGY LETTERS 2022 DEC; 251-252(?):86-90
The intestine is not a homogeneous organ, but rather organized spaces with specific niches and microenvironments filled with different cell types that are involved in physiological and inflammatory processes. The intestinal mucosa shows a high degree of architectural complexity and intratissue specialization that occurs according to luminal composition. These intratissue specialized environments are critical for the developmental and functional adaptation of immune cells in the gut and in the gut-draining lymph nodes. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of gut immune responses and how the lymph nodes that drain different regions of the intestine are immunologically, anatomically, and physiologically distinct. We also propose that studies on gut immunity should consider the distinctive features of intestinal segments and the differences in their draining lymph nodes to fully understand the complexity of the gut immunological scenario.
Woods C, Contoreggi NH, Johnson MA, Milner TA, Wang G, Glass MJ
Show All Authors

Estrogen receptor beta activity contributes to both tumor necrosis factor alpha expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and the resistance to hypertension following angiotensin II in female mice

NEUROCHEMISTRY INTERNATIONAL 2022 DEC; 161(?):? Article 105420
Sex differences in the sensitivity to hypertension and inflammatory processes are well characterized but insufficiently understood. In male mice, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) contributes to hypertension following slow-pressor angiotensin II (AngII) infusion. However, the role of PVN TNF alpha in the response to AngII in female mice is unknown. Using a combination of in situ hybridization, high-resolution electron microscopic immunohistochemistry, spatial-temporal gene silencing, and dihydroethidium microfluorography we investigated the influence of AngII on both blood pressure and PVN TNF alpha signaling in female mice. We found that chronic (14-day) infusion of AngII in female mice did not impact blood pressure, TNF alpha levels, the expression of the TNF alpha type 1 receptor (TNFR1), or the subcellular distribution of TNFR1 in the PVN. However, it was shown that blockade of estrogen receptor beta (ER beta), a major hypothalamic estrogen receptor, was accompanied by both elevated PVN TNF alpha and hypertension following AngII. Further, AngII hypertension following ER beta blockade was attenuated by inhibiting PVN TNF alpha signaling by local TNFR1 silencing. It was also shown that ER beta blockade in isolated PVN-spinal cord projection neurons (i.e. sympathoexcitatory) heightened TNF alpha-induced production of NADPH oxidase (NOX2)-mediated reactive oxygen species, molecules that may play a key role in mediating the effect of TNF alpha in hypertension. These results indicate that ER beta contributes to the reduced sensitivity of female mice to hypothalamic inflammatory cytokine signaling and hypertension in response to AngII.
Sokal A, Bastard P, Chappert P, Barba-Spaeth G, Fourati S, Vanderberghe A, Lagouge-Roussey P, Meyts I, Gervais A, Bouvier-Alias M, Azzaoui I, Fernandez I, de la Selle A, Zhang Q, Bizien L, Pellier I, Linglart A, Rothenbuhler A, Marcoux E, Anxionnat R, Cheikh N, Leger J, Amador-Borrero B, Fouyssac F, Menut V, Goffard JC, Storey C, Demily C, Mallebranche C, Troya J, Pujol A, Zins M, Tiberghien P, Gray PE, McNaughton P, Sullivan A, Peake J, Levy R, Languille L, Rodiguez-Gallego C, Boisson B, Gallien S, Neven B, Michel M, Godeau B, Abel L, Rey FA, Weill JC, Reynaud CA, Tangye SG, Casanova JL, Mahevas M
Show All Authors

Human type I IFN deficiency does not impair B cell response to SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination

JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE 2022 NOV 7; 220(1):? Article e20220258
Intact B cell responses to SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines in patients with genetic or acquired type I IFN deficiencies suggest that type I IFNs induced by mRNA vaccines are not required for vaccine efficacy. Inborn and acquired deficits of type I interferon (IFN) immunity predispose to life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia. We longitudinally profiled the B cell response to mRNA vaccination in SARS-CoV-2 naive patients with inherited TLR7, IRF7, or IFNAR1 deficiency, as well as young patients with autoantibodies neutralizing type I IFNs due to autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) and older individuals with age-associated autoantibodies to type I IFNs. The receptor-binding domain spike protein (RBD)-specific memory B cell response in all patients was quantitatively and qualitatively similar to healthy donors. Sustained germinal center responses led to accumulation of somatic hypermutations in immunoglobulin heavy chain genes. The amplitude and duration of, and viral neutralization by, RBD-specific IgG serological response were also largely unaffected by TLR7, IRF7, or IFNAR1 deficiencies up to 7 mo after vaccination in all patients. These results suggest that induction of type I IFN is not required for efficient generation of a humoral response against SARS-CoV-2 by mRNA vaccines.
Sarhan D, Eisinger S, He F, Bergsland M, Pelicano C, Driescher C, Westberg K, Benitez II, Humoud R, Palano G, Li SJ, Carannante V, Muhr J, Onfelt B, Schlisio S, Ravetch JV, Heuchel R, Lohr MJ, Karlsson MCI
Show All Authors

Targeting myeloid suppressive cells revives cytotoxic anti-tumor responses in pancreatic cancer

ISCIENCE 2022 NOV 18; 25(11):? Article 105317
Immunotherapy for cancer that aims to promote T cell anti-tumor activity has changed current clinical practice, where some previously lethal cancers have now become treatable. However, clinical trials with low response rates have been disappointing for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). One suggested explanation is the accumulation of dominantly immunosuppressive tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Using retrospectively collected tumor specimens and transcriptomic data from PDAC, we demonstrate that expression of the scavenger receptor MARCO correlates with poor prognosis and a lymphocyte-excluding tumor phenotype. PDAC cell lines produce IL-10 and induce high expression of MARCO in myeloid cells, and this was further enhanced during hypoxic conditions. These myeloid cells suppressed effector T and natural killer (NK) cells and blocked NK cell tumor infiltration and tumor killing in a PDAC 3D-spheroid model. Anti-human MARCO (anti-hMARCO) antibody targeting triggered the repolarization of tumor-associated macrophages and activated the inflammasome machinery, resulting in IL-18 production. This in turn enhanced T cell and NK cell functions. The targeting of MARCO thus remodels the TME and represents a rational approach to make immunotherapy more efficient in PDAC patients.
Toh H, Yang CT, Formenti G, Raja K, Yan L, Tracey A, Chow W, Howe K, Bergeron LA, Zhang GJ, Haase B, Mountcastle J, Fedrigo O, Fogg J, Kirilenko B, Munegowda C, Hiller M, Jain A, Kihara D, Rhie A, Phillippy AM, Swanson SA, Jiang P, Clegg DO, Jarvis ED, Thomson JA, Stewart R, Chaisson MJP, Bukhman YV
Show All Authors

A haplotype-resolved genome assembly of the Nile rat facilitates exploration of the genetic basis of diabetes

BMC BIOLOGY 2022 NOV 8; 20(1):? Article 245
Background The Nile rat (Avicanthis niloticus) is an important animal model because of its robust diurnal rhythm, a cone-rich retina, and a propensity to develop diet-induced diabetes without chemical or genetic modifications. A closer similarity to humans in these aspects, compared to the widely used Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus models, holds the promise of better translation of research findings to the clinic. Results We report a 2.5 Gb, chromosome-level reference genome assembly with fully resolved parental haplotypes, generated with the Vertebrate Genomes Project (VGP). The assembly is highly contiguous, with contig N50 of 11.1 Mb, scaffold N50 of 83 Mb, and 95.2% of the sequence assigned to chromosomes. We used a novel workflow to identify 3613 segmental duplications and quantify duplicated genes. Comparative analyses revealed unique genomic features of the Nile rat, including some that affect genes associated with type 2 diabetes and metabolic dysfunctions. We discuss 14 genes that are heterozygous in the Nile rat or highly diverged from the house mouse. Conclusions Our findings reflect the exceptional level of genomic resolution present in this assembly, which will greatly expand the potential of the Nile rat as a model organism.
Nguyenla X, Wehri E, Van Dis E, Biering SB, Yamashiro LH, Zhu C, Stroumza J, Dugast-Darzacq C, Graham TGW, Wang XT, Jockusch S, Tao CAJ, Chien MC, Xie W, Patel DJ, Meyer C, Garzia A, Tuschl T, Russo JJ, Ju JY, Naar AM, Stanley S, Schaletzky J
Show All Authors

Discovery of SARS-CoV-2 antiviral synergy between remdesivir and approved drugs in human lung cells

SCIENTIFIC REPORTS 2022 NOV 2; 12(1):? Article 18506
SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused an ongoing global pandemic with significant mortality and morbidity. At this time, the only FDA-approved therapeutic for COVID-19 is remdesivir, a broad-spectrum antiviral nucleoside analog. Efficacy is only moderate, and improved treatment strategies are urgently needed. To accomplish this goal, we devised a strategy to identify compounds that act synergistically with remdesivir in preventing SARS-CoV-2 replication. We conducted combinatorial high-throughput screening in the presence of submaximal remdesivir concentrations, using a human lung epithelial cell line infected with a clinical isolate of SARS-CoV-2. This identified 20 approved drugs that act synergistically with remdesivir, many with favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profiles. Strongest effects were observed with established antivirals, Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5A (HCV NS5A) inhibitors velpatasvir and elbasvir. Combination with their partner drugs sofosbuvir and grazoprevir further increased efficacy, increasing remdesivir's apparent potency > 25-fold. We report that HCV NS5A inhibitors act on the SARS-CoV-2 exonuclease proofreader, providing a possible explanation for the synergy observed with nucleoside analog remdesivir. FDA-approved Hepatitis C therapeutics Epclusa (R) (velpatasvir/sofosbuvir) and Zepatier (R) (elbasvir/grazoprevir) could be further optimized to achieve potency and pharmacokinetic properties that support clinical evaluation in combination with remdesivir.