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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
Displaying 1107 of 2754 articles.

Promising new drug target for a rare liver cancer

Fibrolamellar carcinoma needs one specific mutation in order to thrive, and impeding it reduces tumor growth in mice.

New evidence of biochemical states and force working in concert

When an actin filament bends during cell movement, older actin deforms differently than newer actin, allowing regulatory proteins to tell the two states apart.

Mathematical modeling suggests counties are still unprepared for COVID spikes

If jurisdictions plan to share resources in advance, the study concludes, this could prevent one rare event from overwhelming a county or state.

Why some people are mosquito magnets

The female mosquito will hunt down any human, but some of us get bitten far more than others. The answer why may be hidden in our skin.

The brain cells that slow us down when we're sick

New study pinpoints the cluster of neurons that tell mice to eat, drink, and move around less when they're fighting bacterial infections.  

Common mutation linked to COVID mortality

Because three percent of the world population possesses these gene variants, the findings may have implications for hundreds of millions of individuals around the world.

Unlocking the mystery of how mosquitoes smell humans

Through questioning their assumptions about how mosquitoes sense and interpret odors, scientists may have discovered why efforts to throw the vectors of dengue and Zika off the human scent have not succeeded.

Ant colonies behave like neural networks when making decisions 

Colonies decide to flee rising temperatures in much the same way that neural computations give rise to decisions.

How the intestine replaces and repairs itself

A new study suggests that stem cells are able to integrate cues from their surroundings and coordinate their behavior across tissue through networks of vasculature in their close vicinity.

Colorectal cancer tumors both helped and hindered by T cells

Researchers have long disagreed over whether 𝛄𝛅T cells in the gut promote or discourage tumor growth, but new evidence suggests they have the capacity to do both.
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