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Primordial shapeshifters 

Only in sci-fi movies can a living cell be created from scratch. But a recent discovery suggests that this tantalizing feat might one day become possible in the real world.

How the immune system deals with the gut's plethora of microbes

New research suggests that our immune system may play an active role in shaping the digestive-tract flora, which is tightly linked to health and disease.

How cells use mechanical tension sensors to interact with their environment

In a painstaking experiment, scientists suspended a single protein filament between two microscopic beads. Their results have shed light on an elusive process in which cells receive and respond to mechanical cues.

Rockefeller issues license for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drug

The novel compound, discovered in Jan L. Breslow’s lab and now licensed to Bridge Medicines, will be designed to treat immune-mediated diseases without harming the rest of the immune system.

New book by Rockefeller researcher spotlights one of nature’s fiercest hunters

Daniel Kronauer publishes a comprehensive monograph on army ants, the creatures at the center of his evolutionary-biology research.

Scientists discover mosquitoes’ unique blood-taste detectors

Female mosquitoes are armed with syringe-like stylets that begin to pump furiously only in the presence of blood. Scientists are now studying the specific neurons that line the stylet, and asking what mosquitoes taste when they bite us.

Rockefeller's Charles M. Rice honored with Nobel Prize for research that contributed to a cure for hepatitis C

Rice will receive the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for research that led to a cure for hepatitis C, a viral disease affecting 170 million people worldwide. His lab worked on the virus for three decades and became the first to produce a version of it that could be grown and studied in the laboratory.

Joanne Chory wins the 2020 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Joanne Chory, who pioneered the application of molecular genetics to plant biology and transformed our understanding of photosynthesis, will receive the prize in a virtual ceremony hosted by Rockefeller on October 22.

Cancer cells use nerve-cell tricks to spread from one organ to the next

New research suggests that breast and lung tumors metastasize by hijacking a neural signaling pathway, potentially opening the door to better diagnostics and treatments.

A revised map of where working memory resides in the brain

Findings from genetically diverse mice challenge long-held assumptions about how the brain is able to briefly hold onto important information.

Recent Awards and Honors

Tomasz Ahrends and Kevin Gonzales receive Tri-Institutional Breakout Awards

June 2, 2022

Tomasz Ahrends, from Daniel Mucida’s lab, and Kevin Gonzales, from Elaine Fuchs’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work.

Leslie B. Vosshall

Leslie B. Vosshall named a member of the American Philosophical Society

June 1, 2022

Vosshall is honored for her investigation of how sensory stimuli are perceived and processed.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Washington Post

“What we are looking for is potentially very rare genetic variants with a very big impact on the individual,” said András Spaan, a clinical microbiologist and fellow at the Rockefeller University in New York who is spearheading a search for genetic material responsible for coronavirus resistance.    

Science News

Michel Nussenzweig and colleagues examined what happens to the immune response after a third dose of vaccine, focusing especially on very long-lived immune cells called memory B cells. Those memory cells still made new antibodies when they got a third look at the vaccine.

Nature

Erich Jarvis says he wants the Human Pangenome Project to achieve a better representation of human genetic diversity. “I’m a person of colour. I grew up as an African American. I grew up as an under-represented minority in the sciences,” he says. “My diversity is not represented. So I have a personal motivation and a societal one to make sure that this pangenome really represents populations.”      

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue explores how stem cells help our bodies form, develop, and heal—and how they’re powering a new surge in science. Also: Do flies ever get lonely? And much more.


From this issue

 


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