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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

Scientists trace severe COVID-19 to faulty genes and autoimmune condition

The findings explain why some people are so vulnerable to the infection, and suggest new avenues for treatment.

When the city locked down, RockEDU moved the lab bench to the kitchen table

With input from participating students and scientists who volunteer with RockEDU, a blended Summer Science Research Program for high-school students was developed. The result was a modified SSRP curriculum with five experiential research tracks, complete with lab supply kits that were mailed to students’ homes.

Attention needs more attention 

Scientists long believed they knew precisely which nooks of the brain control our ability for selective attention. Now, new findings are redrawing the maps.

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How dividing cells avoid setting off false virus alarms

A new molecular structure explains how cells hold an alarm-triggering protein captive during cell division, preventing cells from targeting their own DNA.

Microbes in the gut may influence metabolism

A growing number of studies find that microbes in the gut directly influence biological processes from bowel movements to behavior. New research reveals how they impact levels of glucose in the blood.

Return of the cytonaut 

The lysosome is having a moment. More than 60 years after this bubble-shaped cell structure was first discovered, scientists have found that it is key to our ability to metabolize iron, and a potential target for new cancer drugs.

Bulgari Corporation to support Rockefeller's COVID-19 research and women scientists

Over the next three years, the fund will augment the university's wide-ranging research initiatives aimed at alleviating the COVID-19 pandemic, and also support the its women scientists in their training and careers.

Heritable genome editing technology is not yet ready for clinical use, concludes an international commission co-chaired by President Lifton

A range of scientific and medical issues have yet to be addressed, the committee determined, and many ethical, moral, and societal concerns remain.

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Scientists uncover antiviral protein that blocks coronavirus infection

New research identifies a protein that blocks infection by SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, along with several other types. The findings could inform treatment strategies and help us better prepare for future outbreaks.

How mechanical forces nudge tumors toward malignancy

Researchers studying two forms of skin cancer identified a long-overlooked factor determining why some tumors are more likely to metastasize than others: the physical properties of the tissue in which the cancer originates. The findings might set the stage for new ways to monitor and treat the diseases in the future.

Recent Awards and Honors

Tomasz Ahrends and Kevin Gonzales receive Tri-Institutional Breakout Awards

June 2, 2022

Tomasz Ahrends, from Daniel Mucida’s lab, and Kevin Gonzales, from Elaine Fuchs’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work.

Leslie B. Vosshall

Leslie B. Vosshall named a member of the American Philosophical Society

June 1, 2022

Vosshall is honored for her investigation of how sensory stimuli are perceived and processed.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Washington Post

“What we are looking for is potentially very rare genetic variants with a very big impact on the individual,” said András Spaan, a clinical microbiologist and fellow at the Rockefeller University in New York who is spearheading a search for genetic material responsible for coronavirus resistance.    

Science News

Michel Nussenzweig and colleagues examined what happens to the immune response after a third dose of vaccine, focusing especially on very long-lived immune cells called memory B cells. Those memory cells still made new antibodies when they got a third look at the vaccine.

Nature

Erich Jarvis says he wants the Human Pangenome Project to achieve a better representation of human genetic diversity. “I’m a person of colour. I grew up as an African American. I grew up as an under-represented minority in the sciences,” he says. “My diversity is not represented. So I have a personal motivation and a societal one to make sure that this pangenome really represents populations.”      

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue explores how stem cells help our bodies form, develop, and heal—and how they’re powering a new surge in science. Also: Do flies ever get lonely? And much more.


From this issue

 


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