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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

The future of TB is TBD 

Deadly and elusive, M. tuberculosis has ravaged the world for centuries. Armed with new technologies to study the pathogen, scientists may finally be poised to intervene.

The River Campus is open for business

After four years of construction, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation–David Rockefeller River Campus has opened its doors to the community, with several labs already installed in its new research building.

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New molecular diagnostics test could help guide lupus treatments

A tool that detects glitches in gene expression could help doctors tailor treatments for lupus-related kidney damage.

Rockefeller tops global ranking of research excellence

An extensive international ranking of research institutions by U-Multirank gave Rockefeller top scores in several categories related to scientific impact and knowledge transfer.

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New research shows that mosquitoes sense repellent through their legs

Scientists made the surprising discovery that the insects’ displeasure for touching DEET, the active ingredient in many repellents, helps prevent bites.

Small brains, big decisions 

Life is full of binary choices, even for small animals like fruit flies. With new technologies, scientists can now dissect the mechanisms of decision making in the simplest of brains, at the levels of individual molecules, cells, and networks.

To curb infection, bacteria direct their defenses against themselves

To fight off invading viruses, bacteria have evolved a slew of creative defense tactics. New research shows that in some cases, microbes go to great lengths to keep an infection from spreading, even destroying bits of their own genetic material.

New compounds could be used to treat autoimmune disorders

In autoimmune disorders, the body’s defense system erroneously attacks normal cells, leading to serious health problems. Researchers have developed new molecules that potentially could be used to treat many of these conditions.

New study reveals gut segments organized by function, and opportunities for better drug design

New findings provide insights about how the intestine maximizes nutrient uptake, while at the same time protecting the body from potentially dangerous microbes.

An accreditation renewal, and the campus-wide endeavor to ensure continued safeguarding of research participants

Rockefeller's reaccreditation from the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs marks the end of an extensive application process. The AAHRPP sets the gold standard in safeguarding volunteers participating in clinical research.

Recent Awards and Honors

Junyue Cao

Junyue Cao wins Science & SciLifeLab Grand Prize For Young Scientists

November 19, 2020

Cao is recognized for his work using single-cell genomic methods to enable developmental mapping of entire organisms, described in an essay published in Science.
LLuciano Marraffini portrait

Luciano Marraffini awarded Max Planck-Humboldt Medal

October 14, 2020

Marraffini receives the award for his achievements studying CRISPR-Cas, a bacterial immune mechanism whose discovery led to modern gene-editing tools.
More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Scientist

Paul Cohen of the Rockefeller University describes his study of thousands of people, finding that the energy-burning tissue is tied to a lower risk of for several diseases, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease.

The Wall Street Journal

The Rockefeller team found that the E484K mutation knocked out one important class of antibodies, out of a total of four classes. But Dr. Nussenzweig said that other elements of a person’s immune response—whether triggered by a vaccine or an earlier infection—could still protect against Covid-19.

Nature News

An innovative approach from Priya Rajasethupathy has been used to link genetics to behavior in mice. The analysis identifies a gene that underpins the role of the brain’s thalamus region in maintaining short-term memory.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes us inside the response to the pandemic, where scientists are using every tool in the 21st century playbook to transform COVID-19 into a manageable disease. Also: Mosquito menace, The brain inside your gut, and Addiction then and now.


From this issue

 


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