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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

An accreditation renewal, and the campus-wide endeavor to ensure continued safeguarding of research participants

Rockefeller's reaccreditation from the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs marks the end of an extensive application process. The AAHRPP sets the gold standard in safeguarding volunteers participating in clinical research.

A new sculpture, donated by Torsten N. Wiesel, is perched in front of Flexner Hall

The cast-iron parrot is an architectural ornament from the late 19th or early 20th century.

Cellular rivalry promotes healthy skin development

Scientists have discovered a curious phenomenon taking place in mouse skin: cells compete with one another for the chance to develop into mature tissue. The findings indicate that this antagonism is key to creating healthy skin.

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Researchers find genetic link to tuberculosis

Rockefeller scientists have identified a genetic condition that makes people prone to developing tuberculosis. In a British population, they found that the condition underlies one percent of cases of the disease—a finding that may ultimately lead to new treatment options.

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Study explores genetic differences among people’s gut microbes, and their health consequences

Scientists have found that small genetic differences can cause the same gut microbe to behave differently in different people, and affect the overall health of their human hosts.

Research on repetitive worm behavior may have implications for understanding human disease

Studying microscopic worms, Rockefeller scientists have identified a brain circuit that drives repetitive behavior—providing potential clues for understanding some human psychiatric conditions.

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Jue Chen and Luciano Marraffini elected to National Academy of Sciences

Election to the National Academy of Sciences is one of the most prestigious honors a scientist can receive; including Chen and Marraffini, the number of current Rockefeller scientists who are members of the elite organization stands at 38, or nearly half the faculty.

Drugs from dirt 

Therapeutics has gone underground. From one bag of soil, chemists can now procure millions of microbial molecules. Any one could be tomorrow’s lifesaving medicine.

Study pinpoints what causes relapse after cancer immunotherapy

In many cancer patients who have been treated with immunotherapy, the tumor comes back. New research identifies the cells responsible for thwarting the treatment and offers new insights into how they do it.

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Gene-editing technique opens door for HIV vaccine

Researchers successfully modified immune cells to produce antibodies that fight HIV. This strategy could eventually be used to develop a vaccine against the virus, among other conditions.

Recent Awards and Honors

Junyue Cao

Junyue Cao wins Science & SciLifeLab Grand Prize For Young Scientists

November 19, 2020

Cao is recognized for his work using single-cell genomic methods to enable developmental mapping of entire organisms, described in an essay published in Science.
LLuciano Marraffini portrait

Luciano Marraffini awarded Max Planck-Humboldt Medal

October 14, 2020

Marraffini receives the award for his achievements studying CRISPR-Cas, a bacterial immune mechanism whose discovery led to modern gene-editing tools.
More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

Laboratory studies from Michel Nussenzweig and others of mutations circulating in South Africa suggest they may dodge some of the body’s immune responses.

The Wall Street Journal

Researchers are working on new antibody drugs that can be given with quick jabs in the arm, similar to flu shots. They would enable patients to get treated quickly after being diagnosed with Covid-19, said Michel C. Nussenzweig, an immunologist and professor at Rockefeller University in New York.

Nature News

Evidence from Jean-Laurent Casanova and others is growing that self-attacking ‘autoantibodies’ could be the key to understanding some of the worst cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes us inside the response to the pandemic, where scientists are using every tool in the 21st century playbook to transform COVID-19 into a manageable disease. Also: Mosquito menace, The brain inside your gut, and Addiction then and now.


From this issue

 


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