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Alumni & Student Profiles

Our students and alumni share their experience at Rockefeller in their own words.
Jingyi Chi

Jingyi Chi

Fifth-year student
Graduate Program in Bioscience

“Rockefeller's unique strength is its emphasis on bringing multiple perspectives to bear on a single biological problem.“

“Rockefeller's unique strength is its emphasis on bringing multiple perspectives to bear on a single biological problem.“

Jingyi Chi

Jingyi Chi

Fifth-year student

Graduate Program in Bioscience

Jingyi Chi, a fourth-year student in Paul Cohen’s laboratory, uses molecular and genetic techniques to investigate the difference between white, beige, and brown fat cells, and to probe their ability to burn fat and dissipate heat.
Annie Handler

Annie Handler

Fifth-year student
Graduate Program in Bioscience

“As a Rockefeller student I’m not just learning, I’m also having a direct impact on the progression of research in neuroscience.”

“As a Rockefeller student I’m not just learning, I’m also having a direct impact on the progression of research in neuroscience.”

Annie Handler

Annie Handler

Fifth-year student

Graduate Program in Bioscience

Annie Handler is fascinated by the relationship between an animal’s behavior and its brain’s biology. A fourth-year student in Vanessa Ruta’s laboratory, she’s using the fruit fly as a model to study how neuromodulators, like dopamine, influence the function of neural circuits and give rise to specific behaviors.
Cameron Bess

Cameron Bess

Senior Research Advisor, USAID
Alumnus, Graduate Program in Bioscience

“What really attracted me to Rockefeller was the freedom to chart your own course.”

“What really attracted me to Rockefeller was the freedom to chart your own course.”

Cameron Bess

Cameron Bess

Senior Research Advisor, USAID

Alumnus, Graduate Program in Bioscience

Cameron Bess '09 spent his time at Rockefeller working on viruses that infect millions of people. Now a senior research advisor at USAID, he's working to connect researchers in developing countries with federally funded U.S. scientists studying issues such as food security, disaster mitigation, child health, and infectious disease.
Frank Tejera

Frank Tejera

Fourth-year student
Graduate Program in Bioscience

“The flexibility of Rockefeller’s curriculum has allowed me to develop a scientific background that goes well beyond my area of expertise.”

“The flexibility of Rockefeller’s curriculum has allowed me to develop a scientific background that goes well beyond my area of expertise.”

Frank Tejera

Frank Tejera

Fourth-year student

Graduate Program in Bioscience

Frank Tejera, a third-year student, is interested in microbial mats—thin layers of bacteria and other organisms that live in self-contained ecosystems beneath the ground. By studying their reactions to changing environments, Frank hopes to better understand the past and predict the future of the planet.
Hockemeyer and Bateup

Dirk Hockemeyer & Helen Bateup

Assistant Professor of Neurobiology and Assistant Professor of Cell Developmental Biology, University of California, Berkeley
Alumni, Graduate Program in Bioscience

"I think we both learned that to be a good role model, you have to work as hard as you expect the people in your lab to work. Rockefeller opened our eyes to how science could and should be done."

"I think we both learned that to be a good role model, you have to work as hard as you expect the people in your lab to work. Rockefeller opened our eyes to how science could and should be done."

Hockemeyer and Bateup

Dirk Hockemeyer & Helen Bateup

Assistant Professor of Neurobiology and Assistant Professor of Cell Developmental Biology, University of California, Berkeley

Alumni, Graduate Program in Bioscience

Dirk Hockemeyer (2007 graduate) and Helen Bateup (2008 graduate) who met at Rockefeller, both accepted faculty positions at UC Berkeley. Dirk works on telomeres—repetitive DNA sequences that protect chromosome ends—and Helen is interested in mutations associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.
Stefano Di Talia

Stefano Di Talia

Assistant Professor of Cell Biology, Duke University
Alumnus, Graduate Program in Bioscience

“At Rockefeller, I was encouraged to be bold, to venture into unknown territories, to just go for it.”

“At Rockefeller, I was encouraged to be bold, to venture into unknown territories, to just go for it.”

Stefano Di Talia

Stefano Di Talia

Assistant Professor of Cell Biology, Duke University

Alumnus, Graduate Program in Bioscience

Alumnus Stefano Di Talia (2009 graduate) chose a challenging research topic: How do growing cells sense when they are big enough to start dividing? Building on his background in physics, Stefano explored how imaging, data analysis, and mathematical modeling could yield answers. Today, he is on the faculty at Duke University studying a new, but equally interdisciplinary, question: How do cells keep time?
Natalie de Souza

Natalie de Souza

Chief Editor, Nature Methods
Alumna, Graduate Program in Bioscience

”It's a real privilege to have this kind of view of science and, most of the time, it's also fun.”

”It's a real privilege to have this kind of view of science and, most of the time, it's also fun.”

Natalie de Souza

Natalie de Souza

Chief Editor, Nature Methods

Alumna, Graduate Program in Bioscience

Natalie de Souza '02, chief editor of Nature Methods, chose a career that combines her love of science and her love of writing. The best part for her: an early look at the nitty-gritty experimentation behind cutting-edge papers.
Chad Euler

Chad Euler

Assistant Professor, Hunter College
Alumnus, Graduate Program in Bioscience

“Rockefeller intensified my passion for science, then gave me the tools to become a successful scientist.”

“Rockefeller intensified my passion for science, then gave me the tools to become a successful scientist.”

Chad Euler

Chad Euler

Assistant Professor, Hunter College

Alumnus, Graduate Program in Bioscience

As a student, Chad Euler ’10 worked on viral enzymes with antibiotic properties in Vincent A. Fischetti’s lab. Now an assistant professor at Hunter College, he teaches clinical microbiology and conducts research on bacterial pathogenicity, antimicrobials, and autoimmune disease.
Marianna Agudelo

Marianna Agudelo

Third-year student
Graduate Program in Bioscience

“Rockefeller labs don’t straddle the boundaries between fields. They dive into those spaces headfirst.”

“Rockefeller labs don’t straddle the boundaries between fields. They dive into those spaces headfirst.”

Marianna Agudelo

Marianna Agudelo

Third-year student

Graduate Program in Bioscience

Marianna Agudelo has spent her first months rotating through several labs in order to explore how virology and immunology intersect. Now a second-year student in Charles M. Rice’s lab, she’s working with the yellow fever virus, trying to understand why one strain makes a good vaccine while the other is deadly.
Vicky Moya

Vicky Moya

Seventh-year student
Graduate Program in Bioscience

“At Rockefeller it's all about supporting the science. That focus is what makes the work so much fun.”

“At Rockefeller it's all about supporting the science. That focus is what makes the work so much fun.”

Vicky Moya

Vicky Moya

Seventh-year student

Graduate Program in Bioscience

Vicky Moya, a sixth-year student in Nathaniel Heintz's laboratory, profiles specific populations of neurons in the brains of mice. Her work is part of a project to learn about molecular changes that occur in individual cells during the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS.

Alumni outcomes

Convocation 2017
Our PhD program has an 89% completion rate over the past 14 years, and alumni go on to a variety of careers in academia, industry and biotech, education, government, and beyond.