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New clues about why a universal flu vaccine is so elusive

To scientists' surprise, the immune system develops its response to each virus variant mostly from scratch, instead of building on what it has already learned.

Researchers discover a new mechanism in childhood kidney cancer

A problem in reader proteins that identify which gene is up for expression may cause normal cells to turn malignant during development.

Collaborative Research Center installation bridges past and present scientists

A new digital display, the Scientist Explorer, is a portal into the cumulative accomplishments of researchers with labs in Flexner and Smith Halls.

Scientists develop new method that predicts vulnerability to stress

Researchers have identified a set of biological factors in mice that seem to determine one's ability to bounce back from a traumatic event, and provide preliminary evidence that a naturally-occurring substance may help boost resiliency in the face of stressful situations.

Five-year strategic plan is approved by Board of Trustees

Here are the main priorities of the new plan, intended to maximize the university’s scientific impact through 2024.

Neurodegenerative diseases may be caused by molecular transportation failures inside neurons

Protein clumps are routinely found in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Now researchers find a link between this buildup and the intracellular movement of proteasomes, molecular machines tasked with degrading protein waste inside cells.

A summer program that gives undergraduates the tools to ask big scientific questions

Madeleine Delbeau, who spent 10 weeks in the lab of Seth A. Darst, improves a method for cryo-electron microscopy.

Zoran Jankovic, a member of the Nussenzweig lab for nearly two decades, dies at 60

Zoran Jankovic, known for his generous spirit and unassuming manner, worked in the Nussenzweig lab for nearly 20 years.

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Study sheds new light on how epigenetic events might spur disease

Research that began with the analysis of two developmental syndromes ultimately helped scientists understand how diverse epigenetic mechanisms can combine to drive tissue overgrowth in cancer.

The pathway to Parkinson’s takes a surprising twist

A new study finds that neurons affected in Parkinson’s disease can shut down without fully dying, allowing them to also switch off neighboring cells. The findings might give scientists a better understanding of how the condition wreaks havoc in the brain, as well as ideas for new treatments.

Recent Awards and Honors

Katya Vinogradova

Ekaterina V. Vinogradova receives Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award

January 11, 2022

Vinogradova receives the award for her work exploring how lung tumors suppress immune responses.

Charles M. Rice

Charles M. Rice is elected to the National Academy of Inventors

December 7, 2021

Rice receives the honor for pioneering novel methods for growing and studying hepatitis C virus.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

STAT News

For his part, Paul Bieniasz is feeling more optimistic than he was earlier in the Omicron wave, but he’s not looking for a respite. He wants something more sustained. “I’m not so interested in breathers. These waves, I want to diminish the amplitude rather than the frequency,” he said.  

The New York Times

“People that are vaccinated really are doing very well in terms of hospitalization,” said Michel Nussenzweig, an immunologist at Rockefeller University in New York.

The New York Times

“What molnupiravir does is it disguises itself,” Elizabeth Campbell, an expert in structural biology at the Rockefeller University who studies coronavirus antivirals, said in an interview. “It can propagate errors that are going to be sprinkled all over the genome.”

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how the brain’s internal states drive its remarkable ability to reach different conclusion based on the same information. Also: The latest from Rockefeller’s COVID labs, and much more.


From this issue

 


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