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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
!
Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

26th Annual Lecture and Luncheon

Thursday, May 11, 2023

Skin Stem Cells: Coping with Stress, Inflammation and Cancer


11:30 AM | REGISTRATION
12:00 PM | LECTURE
1:00 PM | LUNCHEON

Caspary Auditorium
The Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue at East 66th Street
New York, NY 10065

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Host

Richard P. Lifton, M.D., Ph.D.

President and Carson Family Professor
LABORATORY OF HUMAN GENETICS AND GENOMICS
The Rockefeller University

Speaker

Elaine Fuchs, Ph.D.

REBECCA C. LANCEFIELD PROFESSOR
ROBIN CHEMERS NEUSTEIN LABORATORY OF
MAMMALIAN CELL BIOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT
THE ROCKEFELLER UNIVERSITY
INVESTIGATOR, HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE

Our skin has a remarkable capacity to renew and repair itself. Whether suffering from sunburns, cuts, infections, or worse, our skin cells mount an inflammatory response to halt the damage and initiate repair. Renowned cell biologist Elaine Fuchs, Ph.D., studies the role of adult stem cells in this process. Research from her laboratory is elucidating the mechanisms stem cells use to protect and heal the skin, while also revealing what happens when these processes go awry. This research has enormous implications for understanding wound healing and inflammation—both in the skin and the gut—as well as autoimmune disorders and proliferative diseases such as cancer.

A world leader in the study of skin biology, Dr. Fuchs has discovered that some cancer cells seize the basic mechanisms that enable stem cells to replenish and repair using them, instead, to fuel cancer growth. Her team has uncovered tumor cells that are responsible for thwarting cancer immunotherapy, leading to patient relapse. This work has profound implications for understanding and treating human disease, including through the development of regenerative medicine and novel cancer therapies.

Dr. Fuchs is a member of the National Academies of Sciences and Medicine. Among her numerous and esteemed honors are the National Medal of Science, the Albany Medical Center Prize, and the Canada Gairdner International Award.

She received her Ph.D. in biochemistry in from Princeton University. She joined the Rockefeller faculty in 2002 as the first Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor, a distinguished chair established by Women & Science supporters. Dr. Fuchs has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator since 1988.