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Winrich Freiwald, who studies facial processing, is promoted to associate professor

by Wynne Parry, science writer Winrich Freiwald, a neuroscientist who studies one of the most basic aspects of social interaction—how the brain processes faces—has been promoted to associate professor as of January 1. Dr. Freiwald, who heads the Laboratory of Neural Systems, works on unde...

Don’t miss these stories about Rockefeller and our scientists

by Eva Kiesler, managing editor In a recent episode of the CUNY TV talk show Conversations in the Digital Age, host Jim Zirin conducts a 30-minute interview with Rockefeller University President Marc Tessier-Lavigne about the university—which Mr. Zirin refers to as an “amazing instituti...

Study identifies signals that make early stem cells

Stem cells work throughout our lives as a sort of handyman, repairing damaged tissues and renewing some normal ones, like the skin we shed. Scientists have come to understand much about how stem cells function when we are adults, but less is known about where these stem cells come from to begin with...

Recent Awards and Honors

Daniel Mucida Portrait

Daniel Mucida named a Pershing Square Sohn Prize–Mathers Foundation Fellow

May 21, 2019

Mucida receives the award for his exploration of the gut’s specialized immune system and its role in colorectal cancer.

Portrait of Elaine Fuchs

Elaine Fuchs elected as a foreign member of the Royal Society

April 17, 2019

Fuchs is recognized for her groundbreaking study of the molecular mechanisms by which skin stem cells make and repair tissues.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

Paul Greengard, an American neuroscientist whose quest to understand how brain cells communicate provided new insights into psychological diseases and earned him a Nobel Prize, and who used his entire $400,000 award to create an academic prize in memory of the mother he never knew, died on Saturday in Manhattan. He was 93.

Associated Press

Further study may reveal surprises about what mosquitoes pay attention to, [Leslie] Vosshall said. And that could lead to better lures for mosquito traps, as well as better repellents. Maybe scientists can find something “10,000 times more disgusting” to a mosquito than the old standby, DEET, she said.

Discover Magazine Blogs

Scientists at Rockefeller University claim they’ve pinpointed a protein in the ear that acts as a sort of molecular gatekeeper, helping convert soundwaves into the electrical signals that our brains interpret as sound. The finding, though incremental, helps establish a more detailed understanding of how hearing works.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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