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Fall search for new faculty has yielded 10 finalists

The annual “open search” process for tenure-track faculty draws on the expertise of the entire university community.

Researchers discover a weakness in a rare cancer that could be exploited with drugs

Researchers have identified a rare type of cancer cell that cannot make cholesterol, a key nutrient. By targeting this deficiency, scientists may be able to develop new strategies for treating the disease.

New online resource brings science outreach to a broader audience

With the launch of a new website, RockEDU Online, more resources are now available for learners, educators, and scientists everywhere.

Lysin therapy offers new hope for fighting drug-resistant bacteria

Increasingly, bacteria do not succumb to antibiotics. Rockefeller researchers have developed a new class of antimicrobial drug, lysin, with one compound showing promising results in a clinical trial—suggesting that an alternative to antibiotics may be on the horizon.

Daniel Kronauer discusses “The Social Lives of Ants” at this year’s Talking science event

More than 350 high school students from across the tri-state area attended this year’s event where Kronauer shared how ants can help answer questions about the principles that govern life.

An end in sight 

Medical science is holding its breath. For decades, the most it could do for people with HIV was to prevent them from dying of AIDS. Now, new therapies are raising hopes for something more: a world in which the virus will no longer cause suffering or fear.

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In simple bacteria, scientists find new evidence of complex immunity

Bacteria use a multifaceted immune response to get rid of invading DNA. In a new study, researchers identify an enzyme that can destroy foreign genetic material capable of evading a microbe’s first line of defense.

Tri-institutional symposium inspires young scientists to get involved in policy

Over 230 attendees from across the country came to campus to learn about a range of topics, such as the federal budget, international science diplomacy, science advocacy, science communication, and careers in science policy.

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Jeffrey M. Friedman to receive the 2019 Wolf Prize in Medicine

Friedman receives the award for his discovery of leptin, a hormone that modulates food intake and energy expenditure.

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Enzyme structure reveals how DNA is opened up for transcription

DNA’s two strands must be separated before its code can be read, or transcribed. By studying the structure of the enzyme RNA polymerase, researchers have elucidated how DNA unwinds and becomes legible.

Recent Awards and Honors

Gregory P. Donaldson portrait

Gregory P. Donaldson named Damon Runyon Fellow

January 29, 2019

Gregory P. Donaldson, a postdoctoral fellow in Daniel Mucida’s lab, was given the award for his research investigating how bacteria in the gut may influence tumor growth.

Portrait of Elaine Fuchs

Elaine Fuchs elected fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

December 11, 2018

Fuchs, Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor and head of the Robin Chemers Neustein Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development, is honored for her pioneering study of the molecular mechanisms by which skin stem cells make and repair tissues and deviate in aging and cancer.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Nature Video

"We as humans are highly social and so much of our life revolves around communication. And then you see these tiny critters on the floor and you see that they also communicate--the follow each other, and they seem to coordinate their actions. Immediately, you start to feel some kind of connection to these guys." -Daniel Kronauer

The Atlantic

"'The whole thing started off as a joke,' says Leslie Vosshall, who led the study. 'The assumption was that the human drugs would kill the animal or have no effect. It was a stupid thing.' So imagine her surprise when it worked."

The New York Times

"Dr. Nirody, who will start research at Rockefeller University this coming year, and Judy Jinn, were graduate students in the lab of Robert J. Full at the University of California, Berkeley, when they decided to subject the geckos’ water running to greater scrutiny. They built a tank, acquired some house geckos and used video to document the geckos’ water running in a controlled environment so that it could be mathematically analyzed."

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue includes a deep dive into the science that could finally end HIV; a conversation with neuroscientist Cori Bargmann about the brain’s intrinsic nature; and a lot more.


From this issue

 

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Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.