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Erich Jarvis receives grant from W.M. Keck foundation

With a new grant from the W.M. Keck foundation, the Jarvis Lab will further their research on the genes and neural circuits involved in speech production.

Studies reveal possible origin of human speech

Scientists have long debated the evolutionary origins of human speech. New research reveals neural circuits in the brains of monkeys that may represent the source of our unique speech capabilities.

Scientists discover a mechanism of drug resistance in breast and ovarian cancer

A new study helps explain why certain cancers don't respond to treatment, and offers hope for overcoming this deadly resistance.

New faculty member studies the mechanics of development, challenging long-held assumptions

Earlier this month, developmental biologist Amy Shyer joined the Rockefeller community as an assistant professor. Shyer combines mechanical and molecular perspectives to better understand how patterns form and how tissues develop.

Three Rockefeller scientists promoted to professor

Sean Brady, Winrich Freiwald, and Luciano Marraffini have been promoted to professor. Respectively, these scientists have characterized previously unknown small molecules, provided insight into how the brain processes faces, and revolutionized gene editing.

Rockefeller University Press launches new science journal with the publishing arms of EMBO and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Life Science Alliance is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal with a streamlined manuscript submission and review process.

Deep in the fly brain, a clue to how evolution changes minds

A new study sheds light on the mysterious ways in which evolution may tweak the brain to shape behavior. It started with a close look at two Drosophila species and their mating maneuvers.

David Rockefeller Fellowship awarded to graduate student Krithika Venkataraman

Venkataraman has been recognized for her study of the hormonal triggers that lead female mosquitoes to toggle between hunting for blood and spawning eggs.

A new tactic for starving tumors

Scientists have found a metabolic particularity in tumor cells lacking oxygen. The discovery might point to new drugs to target the most difficult-to-treat spots within a tumor.

Scientists solve the case of the missing subplate, with wide implications for brain science

A new study shows that a group of neurons, previously thought to die in the course of development, in fact become incorporated into the brain’s cortex. This research has implications for understanding—and possibly treating—several brain disorders.

Recent Awards and Honors

Daniel Mucida Portrait

Daniel Mucida named a Pershing Square Sohn Prize–Mathers Foundation Fellow

May 21, 2019

Mucida receives the award for his exploration of the gut’s specialized immune system and its role in colorectal cancer.

Portrait of Elaine Fuchs

Elaine Fuchs elected as a foreign member of the Royal Society

April 17, 2019

Fuchs is recognized for her groundbreaking study of the molecular mechanisms by which skin stem cells make and repair tissues.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

Paul Greengard, an American neuroscientist whose quest to understand how brain cells communicate provided new insights into psychological diseases and earned him a Nobel Prize, and who used his entire $400,000 award to create an academic prize in memory of the mother he never knew, died on Saturday in Manhattan. He was 93.

Associated Press

Further study may reveal surprises about what mosquitoes pay attention to, [Leslie] Vosshall said. And that could lead to better lures for mosquito traps, as well as better repellents. Maybe scientists can find something “10,000 times more disgusting” to a mosquito than the old standby, DEET, she said.

Discover Magazine Blogs

Scientists at Rockefeller University claim they’ve pinpointed a protein in the ear that acts as a sort of molecular gatekeeper, helping convert soundwaves into the electrical signals that our brains interpret as sound. The finding, though incremental, helps establish a more detailed understanding of how hearing works.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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