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In clinical trials, new antibody therapy controls HIV for months after treatment

A new clinical trial shows that broadly neutralizing antibodies can suppress HIV for up to four months, far longer than currently available drugs.

Study of protein “trafficker” provides insight into autism and other brain disorders

Researchers have discovered that the protein ASTN2 shuttles receptors away from the surface of neurons, a process that facilitates efficient brain activity.

Jennifer Doudna to receive the 2018 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Doudna, a pioneer in the study of RNA, will be given the prize during a ceremony on the Rockefeller campus on Tuesday, October 2.

C. David Allis wins 2018 Lasker Award for discovery of new mechanisms regulating gene expression

Allis receives the nation's top science award for research on epigenetic gene regulation and its role in disease.

New campus caterer to focus on fresh food, variety, and sustainability

Committed to innovative cuisine, Great Performances will be introducing changes over the next weeks and months as they get to know Rockefeller tastes and culture.

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New gene-engineering technique will help scientists study the immune system

Using gene editing technology, researchers have developed a new way to study B cell activation in mice. This technique makes research more efficient, and has the potential to improve our understanding of immune responses in humans.

Third Rockefeller cryo-EM to help tame poorly behaved proteins

With a new transmission cryo-electron microscope, Rockefeller researchers will be prepared to sleuth out complicated protein structures in increasingly sophisticated ways.

Ant-y social: study of clonal raider ants reveals the evolutionary benefits of group living

A new study in ants demonstrates that living in groups leads to improved fitness. The researchers show that, in larger groups, ants take on specialized roles and colony stability increases.

New faculty member studies the architecture of the genome

Risca explores the three-dimensional structures that organize and support DNA, and the biochemical rules that govern the organization of the genome. She will join Rockefeller as an assistant professor on January 2, 2019.

Structure of ion channel reveals how insects smell their way around the world

Researchers describe, for the first time, the structure of a smell-receptor protein common among insects. Its inner architecture illuminates how insects evolved to detect an amazing diversity of odors.

Recent Awards and Honors

Elaine Fuchs elected fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

December 11, 2018

Fuchs, Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor and head of the Robin Chemers Neustein Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development, is honored for her pioneering study of the molecular mechanisms by which skin stem cells make and repair tissues and deviate in aging and cancer.

Christian Mayer

Christian Mayer receives Robert Koch Postdoctoral Award for Immunology

November 16, 2018

Mayer, a postdoctoral associate in Michel C. Nussenzweig’s lab, was a joint winner of this year’s award for his research in the field of adaptive immunity.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

"Dr. Nirody, who will start research at Rockefeller University this coming year, and Judy Jinn, were graduate students in the lab of Robert J. Full at the University of California, Berkeley, when they decided to subject the geckos’ water running to greater scrutiny. They built a tank, acquired some house geckos and used video to document the geckos’ water running in a controlled environment so that it could be mathematically analyzed."

Newsweek

"'I was sick of hearing that my lab members couldn't find complete versions of the genes we were working on,' Leslie Vosshall, another author of the study from Rockefeller, said in a statement. 'So, I took my frustration to Twitter, and quickly assembled the Aedes Genome Working Group.'"

The New York Times

"It was beginning to look hopeless for obese people. Then, in 1995, Dr. Jeffrey Friedman of Rockefeller University discovered what looked like the equivalent of insulin for diabetes—a molecule he called leptin that is secreted by fat cells and tells the brain how much fat the body has."

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue includes a deep dive into the science that could finally end HIV; a conversation with neuroscientist Cori Bargmann about the brain’s intrinsic nature; and a lot more.


From this issue

 

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Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.