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Astrophysicist Kip Thorne to receive Rockefeller’s 2018 science writing prize

Thorne is recognized for his deft explanations that have drawn readers into the space-, time-, and mind-bending realm of Einstein’s ideas. The prize, which honors scientists as inspirational authors, will be presented on April 17.

What happens to a dying cell’s corpse? New findings illuminate an old problem

Scientists have discovered a curious way for cells to die. In studying it, they are learning about how remnants of diseased cells are normally chewed up and removed.

Scientists map the portal to the cell’s nucleus

The gateway to cellular headquarters has 552 components. A new map that shows how all these pieces fit together could help scientists study numerous diseases.

Scientists caution that a rare childhood liver cancer can spread to the brain

A new report details three cases of secondary brain tumors in people with fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. The researchers say imaging tests could improve treatment for patients whose cancer spreads to the brain from the liver.

Molecular doorstop could be key to new tuberculosis drugs

In discovering how an antibiotic kills the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, scientists open the door to new treatments for the disease—and possibly others, as well.

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Building the machinery that makes proteins

Scientists have used cryo-electron microscopy to capture the very first snapshots of the large ribosomal subunit—part of the ribosome responsible for forging bonds between amino acids, the building blocks of proteins—coming together.

Molecule discovered in dirt could help against multi-resistant bacteria

In mining soil for natural drugs, scientists have discovered a brand-new antibiotic potent against many bacteria. They hope it could be used to treat infections that cannot be stopped with existing drugs.

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In brief: Tweaking RNA protects cells from harmful inflammation

New research has helped explain what goes wrong in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome, a rare brain disorder. Patients with the disease have genetic abnormalities that may put their cells at risk of accidentally triggering an antiviral response.

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In brief: Mutation explains why some people are more vulnerable to viral brain infection

Scientists identified mutations in a single gene that impair immunity to viruses in a region of the brain called the brain stem.

Günter Blobel, a Nobel laureate who redefined cell biology, has died

Günter Blobel, a Nobel Prize-winning Rockefeller biologist who discovered the mechanisms by which proteins are targeted for delivery to specific locations within cells, died February 18 at 81.

Recent Awards and Honors

Distinguished Teaching Award Plaque

Seth A. Darst and Michael P. Rout receive Distinguished Teaching Awards

June 14, 2018

Darst and Rout were honored at the 2018 Convocation luncheon for their dedication to training Rockefeller graduate students. Together, they teach a course in biochemistry and biophysics methods.

Gregory M. Alushin

Gregory M. Alushin honored as a 2018 Pew Scholar

June 14, 2018

Alushin has been named a biomedical science scholar for his investigation of how cells sense and respond to mechanical force.

Rockefeller in the News

Scientific American

As [A. James] Hudspeth explored the neural mechanisms of hearing over the years, he developed a special appreciation for the intricate anatomy of the inner ear—an appreciation that transcends the laboratory. “I think we as scientists tend to underemphasize the aesthetic aspect of science,” he says.

Science

"'It is mind-blowing' that cells from such evolutionarily distant species can share these developmental instructions, says Ali Brivanlou, a stem cell biologist at The Rockefeller University in New York City and a senior author on the new study. The organizer 'has been conserved evolutionarily over hundreds of millions of years, so not seeing it would have been a surprise,' he says. But, 'There is something really emotional about looking that far back at human origin.'"

NIH Director's Blog

"[Michael] Rout and [Brian] Chait have spent more than 20 years trying to solve the structure of NPCs. Not only are NPCs large and constantly engaged in shuttling molecules in and out, they also represent moving machines."

 

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Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.