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New tool allows scientists to catch elusive protein in action

Scientists still have a lot to learn about the processes that trigger cell division, partly because they happen so quickly. A new chemical probe will make it possible to capture the workings of one of the key players.

Physician-writer Siddhartha Mukherjee will be awarded the 2019 Lewis Thomas Prize

The author of The Emperor of all Maladies, a best-selling book about cancer, will be presented with Rockefeller’s science writing award at a free, public ceremony on Rockefeller's campus next month.

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Researchers discover a common link among diverse cancer types

Some cancers have been traced to changes in histones, proteins responsible for packaging DNA and regulating genes. Now, research from Rockefeller scientists shows that, among tumors, mutations to these proteins are a lot more common than previously suspected.

The face-recognition puzzle 

For the brain, seeing a face is very different from seeing a teacup. In studying a mysterious ailment, face blindness, scientists are getting a rare glimpse into the biology of the mind.

Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center will end 23-year affiliation with Rockefeller

A move to Columbia University will provide a new home for ADARC, which for many years has occupied laboratories in a city-owned building on First Avenue.

Rockefeller reaches key milestone in River Campus project

The temporary certificate of occupancy from the New York City Department of Buildings is a close-to-last step in the expansion of the university’s campus over the FDR Drive.

David C. Gadsby, who studied electrical impulses in cells, dies

Gadsby, who passed away Saturday at age 71, was best known for his studies determining the mechanisms by which charged particles called ions move across cell membranes.

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Scientists find new clues about how the body stores fat

Scientists discovered a protein that plays a crucial role in regulating fatty acids, the molecules that make up body fat. This research could lead to new options for treating people with diseases associated with fatty acid buildup.

Scientists identify genetic factors that may cause some people to become obese

New research on leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, reveals a previously unknown mechanism that may be responsible for at least 10 percent of obesity cases. The findings could help identify individuals with treatable forms of the condition.

Inside the brains of hungry worms, researchers find clues about how they hunt

When looking for food, the roundworm C. elegans searches the same area for up to 20 minutes before trying its luck at more distant locales. New research on the worm’s brain explains how this behavior arises at the level of molecules and cells.

Recent Awards and Honors

Priya Rajasethupathy to receive Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

July 2, 2019

Rajasethupathy is honored for her investigation of memory and related cognitive processes.

Li Zhao portrait

Li Zhao announced as 2019 Rita Allen Foundation Scholar

July 1, 2019

Zhao receives the award for her research on the origin and evolution of novel genes.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

NPR

"I really feel like I'm looking at one of the most mysterious aspect of our own existence," Brivanlou says. Brivanlou, Simunovic and their colleagues hope their creations will lead to fundamental discoveries that could have many implications, including a better understanding of the the origins of many diseases.

The New York Times

“It’s tempting to think marijuana is a harmless substance that poses no threat to teens and young adults. The medical facts, however, reveal a different reality.” —Mary Jeanne Kreek in an op-ed for The New York Times

Quanta Magazine

“We’re proposing that in fact, for much of eukaryotic evolution, the nucleus as we know it today didn’t exist,” said Michael Rout, a cell biologist at the Rockefeller University and one of the paper’s co-authors.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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