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The Abby Dining Room turns a page

Earlier this month, the Abby reopened with table service, libations, and new menus.

Xiaowei Zhuang will receive the 2019 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Zhuang, who pioneered the development of super-resolution and genome-scale imaging techniques, will be given the prize during a ceremony on the Rockefeller campus on November 19.

Study pinpoints rare genetic change that may boost risk of HPV-related illness

The human papilloma virus is usually kept in check by the immune system, but scientists identified a genetic variant that makes some infected children prone to developing warts in the throat.

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C. David Allis elected to the National Academy of Medicine

Allis, whose pioneering research established that enzymes that modify histone proteins, which package DNA in the nucleus, regulate gene expression, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.

Biologist and ant paparazzo Daniel Kronauer recognized in Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition

An expert on ant biology, Kronauer found himself in the right place at the right time to capture a cathedral-shaped bivouac, or ants’ nest, in Costa Rica. The photo is now part of an international exhibit by the prestigious Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.

Research on cell division provides new clues to how a common cancer treatment works

In studying cell division, scientists happened upon a new way of understanding how a chemotherapy compound works. The findings could make it possible to predict which patients are most likely to benefit from the drug.

Shapeshifting receptors may explain mysterious drug failures

Scientists have found that many receptors with high potential for drug discovery take a different configuration inside the body than in the test tube. The findings could explain why some promising drugs fail in clinical trials, and potentially open doors to new drug-development approaches.

Tips for a greener lab

Even the most routine scientific experiment may come with a hefty environmental footprint. Here are several best practices to reduce waste, save energy, and cultivate more planet-friendly lab habits.

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Vanessa Ruta named a 2019 MacArthur Fellow

Ruta, who investigates how the brain is modified by experience, has received a MacArthur Fellowship, an award intended to encourage people of outstanding talent to pursue their own creative, intellectual, and professional inclinations.

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Study gives clues to the origin of Huntington’s disease, and a new way to find drugs

Using a new technique to study brain development, scientists were able to trace the causes of Huntington's back to early developmental stages when the brain has only just begun to form.

Recent Awards and Honors

Jeremy M. Rock portrait

Jeremy Rock selected as a Rita Allen Foundation Scholar

July 31, 2019

Rock receives the award for his study of the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

Shixin Liu portrait

Shixin Liu receives a Pershing Square Sohn Prize for Young Investigators in Cancer Research

July 28, 2020

Liu receives the award for his exploration of undesirable epigenetic changes that can lead to a variety of diseases, including cancer.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

NIH Director's Blog

The findings from the Nussenzweig lab help not only to understand the immune response to COVID-19, they are also critical for vaccine design, revealing what a strong neutralizing antibody for SARS-CoV-2 should look like to help the immune system win.

The Scientist

Erich Jarvis on what we can and must do to make science more equitable.

Scientific American

As drug-resistant superbugs spread, Vincent Fischetti and others are turning to microbes that kill bacteria. At a time when much of the world is besieged by a virus, it's good to know that these tiny invaders may someday save us.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


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