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How skin cells embark on a swift yet elaborate death

Scientists have identified the mechanism that allows skin cells to sense changes in their environment, and very quickly respond to reinforce the skin's outermost layer. The findings provide insight into how errors in this process might lead to skin conditions like psoriasis.  

Research on soldier ants reveals that evolution can go in reverse

Turtle ant soldiers and their oddly-shaped heads suggest that evolution is not always a one-way street toward increasing specialization.

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Paul Muller wins 2020 Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Muller receives the honor for his examination of the interactions between neurons in the intestinal tract, known as enteric neurons, and intestinal macrophages, a kind of immune cell.

Rockefeller gets a new, more efficient boiler

With the aid of a mobile crane and a crew of around 20, a fully assembled Cleaver Brooks Fire Tube boiler was delivered into the university’s Power House. This winter, after months of work to plumb, wire, and test the machine, it was lit for the first time and began providing heat to Rockefeller buildings.

When zombies take over the brain 

Research on Parkinson’s has taken a surprising twist. A group of neurons long assumed to expire in the disease were recently found to not be dead after all—providing a possible explanation for how the condition worsens.

Rockefeller grants commercial license for the development of new HIV drugs

The novel compounds are based on so-called broadly neutralizing antibodies, molecules that make rare people's immune systems capable of fighting HIV. They could potentially yield new treatment and prevention approaches benefitting people around the world, including in developing countries.

The Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute renews partnerships with Takeda and Bridge Medicines

The renewal allows Rockefeller faculty to continue transforming their discoveries into new medicines.

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Neuron-like activity detected in an unforeseen place

Scientists have identified a particular type of skin cell that looks and behaves similar to a nerve cell, prompting new questions about the body's biggest organ.

New BSL-3 lab to advance research on pathogens

Rockefeller researchers studying the tuberculosis bacterium now have access to a state-of-the-art biosafety level 3 laboratory on campus. The new facility is one of only a small handful in New York City.

Becoming a Scientist: Jasmine Nirody 

She’s the physicist whose love of locomotion became a research topic, and a career.

Recent Awards and Honors

Alexander Meeske

Alexander Meeske receives Tri-Institutional Breakout Award

June 11, 2020

A postdoctoral fellow in lab of Luciano Marraffini, Meeske is honored for his research on how bacteria cope with stresses in their environment.

Albert J. Libchaber

Albert J. Libchaber named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 26, 2019

Libchaber is recognized for his contributions to the field of experimental condensed matter physics.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

NIH Director's Blog

The findings from the Nussenzweig lab help not only to understand the immune response to COVID-19, they are also critical for vaccine design, revealing what a strong neutralizing antibody for SARS-CoV-2 should look like to help the immune system win.

The Scientist

Erich Jarvis on what we can and must do to make science more equitable.

Scientific American

As drug-resistant superbugs spread, Vincent Fischetti and others are turning to microbes that kill bacteria. At a time when much of the world is besieged by a virus, it's good to know that these tiny invaders may someday save us.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


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