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In brief: Immune cells surveil intestine to prevent infections

Scientists found that immune cells called intraepithelial lymphocytes act as a surveillance force at the intestine, helping to generate an appropriate immune response to both friendly bacteria and dangerous pathogens.

In brief: New clues about how cells restart stalled replication

Scientists studying the cell’s DNA-copying machinery have discovered a molecular mechanism that helps reactivate it should it stop prematurely. Its function may prevent genetic errors like those that cause cancer.

Brain research points the way to new treatments for nicotine addiction

Scientists have discovered a group of brain cells that may play a role in keeping smokers addicted to nicotine. Their work could ultimately lead to new drugs to help people conquer their tobacco dependence.

Neuroscientist Vanessa Ruta promoted to associate professor

Ruta, who explores how brains produce such flexible responses to fixed stimuli, has been promoted to Gabrielle H. Reem and Herbert J. Kayden associate professor.

Daniel Kronauer, who uses ants to study social behavior, is promoted

Kronauer has been promoted to associate professor. He has dedicated his laboratory to investigating the molecular basis underlying complex social behavior among insects.

Mosquito sex protein could provide key to controlling disease

A protein transferred from male to female mosquitoes during sex influences female mating behavior—a phenomenon that could be exploited to limit the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses like Zika and dengue.

Michel C. Nussenzweig wins 2017 Sanofi-Institut Pasteur Award

Nussenzweig was honored at a ceremony today at the Institut Pasteur in Paris.The award recognizes investigators for past or ongoing work demonstrating real scientific progress in the life sciences.

Michael W. Young receives 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Young was honored for his discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm. He accepted the Nobel medal and diploma from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden.

Glial cells, not neurons, lead the way in brain assembly

Researchers have found that the cells directing the very first steps of brain formation are not other neurons, as scientists have long assumed. They've also uncovered previously hidden molecular pathways that attract neurons into the brain.

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In brief: A close look at how HIV-fighting proteins slow the virus down

A new study sheds light on how the body fights back against HIV by mutating the viral DNA.

Recent Awards and Honors

Junyue Cao

Junyue Cao wins Science & SciLifeLab Grand Prize For Young Scientists

November 19, 2020

Cao is recognized for his work using single-cell genomic methods to enable developmental mapping of entire organisms, described in an essay published in Science.
LLuciano Marraffini portrait

Luciano Marraffini awarded Max Planck-Humboldt Medal

October 14, 2020

Marraffini receives the award for his achievements studying CRISPR-Cas, a bacterial immune mechanism whose discovery led to modern gene-editing tools.
More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Nature News

An innovative approach from Priya Rajasethupathy has been used to link genetics to behavior in mice. The analysis identifies a gene that underpins the role of the brain’s thalamus region in maintaining short-term memory.

NBC News

Research led by Jean-Laurent Casanova shows Covid-19 patients with life-threatening illness have antibodies that disable key immune system proteins called interferons.

Knowable Magazine

Just how sick we get from COVID-19 depends on genetic variations, including ones that sabotage immune molecules called interferons. Jean-Laurent Casanova's work aims to better understand why, which could lead to new treatments for COVID-19 and other scourges.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes us inside the response to the pandemic, where scientists are using every tool in the 21st century playbook to transform COVID-19 into a manageable disease. Also: Mosquito menace, The brain inside your gut, and Addiction then and now.


From this issue

 


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