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Lysin therapy offers new hope for fighting drug-resistant bacteria

Increasingly, bacteria do not succumb to antibiotics. Rockefeller researchers have developed a new class of antimicrobial drug, lysin, with one compound showing promising results in a clinical trial—suggesting that an alternative to antibiotics may be on the horizon.

Daniel Kronauer discusses “The Social Lives of Ants” at this year’s Talking science event

More than 350 high school students from across the tri-state area attended this year’s event where Kronauer shared how ants can help answer questions about the principles that govern life.

An end in sight 

Medical science is holding its breath. For decades, the most it could do for people with HIV was to prevent them from dying of AIDS. Now, new therapies are raising hopes for something more: a world in which the virus will no longer cause suffering or fear.

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In simple bacteria, scientists find new evidence of complex immunity

Bacteria use a multifaceted immune response to get rid of invading DNA. In a new study, researchers identify an enzyme that can destroy foreign genetic material capable of evading a microbe’s first line of defense.

Tri-institutional symposium inspires young scientists to get involved in policy

Over 230 attendees from across the country came to campus to learn about a range of topics, such as the federal budget, international science diplomacy, science advocacy, science communication, and careers in science policy.

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Jeffrey M. Friedman to receive the 2019 Wolf Prize in Medicine

Friedman receives the award for his discovery of leptin, a hormone that modulates food intake and energy expenditure.

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Enzyme structure reveals how DNA is opened up for transcription

DNA’s two strands must be separated before its code can be read, or transcribed. By studying the structure of the enzyme RNA polymerase, researchers have elucidated how DNA unwinds and becomes legible.

Electronic engineer Larry Eisenberg, who helped develop the modern pacemaker, dies at 99

In addition to his work at Rockefeller, Eisenberg was a prolific writer of science fiction and limericks.

Attallah Kappas, who led studies of newborn jaundice, dies at 92

Attallah Kappas, professor emeritus at The Rockefeller University and physician-in-chief emeritus at The Rockefeller University Hospital, died December 18, 2018 at the age of 92. Kappas was a leading authority in diseases related to liver function and metabolism and in the development of diagnostics and treatments for those conditions.

Study identifies genetic mutation responsible for tuberculosis vulnerability

Scientists discovered a genetic variant that greatly increases a person’s likelihood of developing tuberculosis. Their research elucidates how this mutation affects the immune system, and points to a possible treatment for people with the disease.

Recent Awards and Honors

Amelia Escolano and Marc Schneeberger Pané named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalists

September 23, 2020

Escolano, from Michel C. Nussenzweig’s lab, and Schneeberger Pané, from Jeffrey M. Friedman’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work in the life sciences category.

Li Zhao portrait

Li Zhao named a Vallee Scholar

August 12, 2020

Zhao receives the honor for her research on how novel genes arise.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Science Magazine

Two studies from Jean-Laurent Casanova reveal that in a significant minority of patients with serious COVID-19, the interferon response has been crippled by genetic flaws or by rogue antibodies that attack interferon itself.

The Wall Street Journal

“The immune system in people is as diverse as beauty, height, intelligence and any other human feature,” said molecular immunologist Michel Nussenzweig at Rockefeller University in New York. “Not everybody is the same in their ability to fight infection.”

The Guardian

Clinical use of heritable genome editing should not be considered until it's established that precise genomic changes can be made reliably without introducing undesired changes, according to a joint NAS, NAM, and Royal Society commission co-chaired by Rockefeller president Richard P. Lifton.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


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