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Jue Chen and Luciano Marraffini elected to National Academy of Sciences

Election to the National Academy of Sciences is one of the most prestigious honors a scientist can receive; including Chen and Marraffini, the number of current Rockefeller scientists who are members of the elite organization stands at 38, or nearly half the faculty.

Drugs from dirt 

Therapeutics has gone underground. From one bag of soil, chemists can now procure millions of microbial molecules. Any one could be tomorrow’s lifesaving medicine.

Study pinpoints what causes relapse after cancer immunotherapy

In many cancer patients who have been treated with immunotherapy, the tumor comes back. New research identifies the cells responsible for thwarting the treatment and offers new insights into how they do it.

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Gene-editing technique opens door for HIV vaccine

Researchers successfully modified immune cells to produce antibodies that fight HIV. This strategy could eventually be used to develop a vaccine against the virus, among other conditions.

Rockefeller creativity on display at the 21st annual employee art show

This year’s show featured portraiture, travel photography, collage, and other mediums.

Celebrating and remembering Paul Greengard, a pioneering neuroscientist and Nobel laureate

Greengard revolutionized our understanding of how brain cells communicate with each other and contributed to major advances in the treatment of a wide range of neurological and psychiatric diseases. He died April 13 at the age of 93.

New microscopy technique peers deep into the brain

Using new imaging technology, researchers can now record the activity of large populations of brain cells with unprecedented speed, and at new depths.

New hope for treating a childhood brain cancer

Recent research has shown that a drug known as MI-2 can kill cells that cause a fatal brain cancer. But only now have scientists been able to explain how the compound works: by targeting cholesterol production in tumors.

New approach to treating gastrointestinal disease patches up leaky intestines

Researchers have discovered a new compound that helps fortify the intestine's inner lining, which becomes porous in inflammatory bowel diseases.  

Scientists find brain mechanism that naturally combats overeating

Studying a brain region involved in memory, researchers discovered a set of neurons that help mice control their appetite.

Recent Awards and Honors

Jeremy M. Rock portrait

Jeremy Rock selected as a Rita Allen Foundation Scholar

July 31, 2019

Rock receives the award for his study of the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

Shixin Liu portrait

Shixin Liu receives a Pershing Square Sohn Prize for Young Investigators in Cancer Research

July 28, 2020

Liu receives the award for his exploration of undesirable epigenetic changes that can lead to a variety of diseases, including cancer.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

NIH Director's Blog

The findings from the Nussenzweig lab help not only to understand the immune response to COVID-19, they are also critical for vaccine design, revealing what a strong neutralizing antibody for SARS-CoV-2 should look like to help the immune system win.

The Scientist

Erich Jarvis on what we can and must do to make science more equitable.

Scientific American

As drug-resistant superbugs spread, Vincent Fischetti and others are turning to microbes that kill bacteria. At a time when much of the world is besieged by a virus, it's good to know that these tiny invaders may someday save us.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


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