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Findings shed new light on why Zika causes birth defects in some pregnancies

Researchers have shown that antibodies against Zika might be involved in causing birth defects in babies born to infected women. The findings might provide important caveats for the development of a vaccine.

With tiny technological tweezers, researchers uncover new aspects of cell division

Cell division is critical to creating and sustaining life. It’s also incredibly difficult to study. Now, advanced technology is enabling researchers to take their understanding of this process to the next level.

Interview: Ali H. Brivanlou 

With science constantly advancing, ethical boundaries need regular recalibration. It’s a task scientists cannot do alone, says Brivanlou; all of society needs to engage.

Exploring genetic “dark matter,” researchers gain new insights into autism and stroke

For the brain to function smoothly, its cells must carefully regulate which proteins are produced and when. By studying gene regulation, researchers are now shedding light on complex brain conditions like autism and stroke.

Fruit flies find their way by setting navigational goals

Navigating fruit flies do not have the luxury of GPS, but they do have a kind of neural compass. In a new study, researchers found that the animals decide which way to turn by comparing this internal compass needle to a fixed goal.

David Rockefeller Fellowships awarded to graduate students Stephanie Marcus and Zachary Mirman

The fellowships recognize their research and leadership within the student community.

Sebastian Klinge promoted to associate professor

Klinge studies the mechanisms by which ribosomes—the intricate machines that manufacture every cell’s proteins—are assembled.

Hinge-like protein may open new doors in cystic fibrosis treatment

Drugs known as potentiators alleviate some symptoms of cystic fibrosis. Researchers recently figured out how these compounds work—a finding that may lead to better drugs that patients can more easily afford.

Celebrating and remembering Mitchell Feigenbaum, physicist who pioneered chaos theory

A mathematical physicist, Feigenbaum's groundbreaking work on deterministic chaos influenced fields ranging from cardiology to cartography. He died on June 30, at age 74.

Three-dimensional model illuminates key aspects of early development

Researchers have created a new 3D model of human embryonic tissue that promises to shed light on critical components of development—including processes that go awry during pregnancy complications.

Recent Awards and Honors

Albert J. Libchaber

Albert J. Libchaber named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 26, 2019

Libchaber is recognized for his contributions to the field of experimental condensed matter physics.

Two Rockefeller Scientists honored with NIH Director’s Awards

October 1, 2019

Brian T. Chait and Erich D. Jarvis received the NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award for high-risk, high-reward research. Read more about the awards here.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Washington Post

Jean-Laurent Casanova, an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and physician at Rockefeller University Hospital, suspects vulnerability to the virus among some young people may be partly encoded in their DNA.

The Washington Post

Rockefeller University immunologist Michel Nussenzweig and his colleagues launched a study of people who have recovered from coronavirus infections this month — a study that also focuses on antibodies.

The New York Times

A neuroscientist, Bruce McEwen showed how an unrelenting barrage of stress hormones can break down the body, leading to disease, depression, obesity and more.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 

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