Skip to main content

Inside the brains of hungry worms, researchers find clues about how they hunt

When looking for food, the roundworm C. elegans searches the same area for up to 20 minutes before trying its luck at more distant locales. New research on the worm’s brain explains how this behavior arises at the level of molecules and cells.

The long-neglected culprit of Alzheimer’s 

Despite decades of study, we know surprisingly little about why neurons fail and memories fade. One researcher is finding clues where few others have looked—in the brain’s blood chemistry.

Fall search for new faculty has yielded 10 finalists

The annual “open search” process for tenure-track faculty draws on the expertise of the entire university community.

Researchers discover a weakness in a rare cancer that could be exploited with drugs

Researchers have identified a rare type of cancer cell that cannot make cholesterol, a key nutrient. By targeting this deficiency, scientists may be able to develop new strategies for treating the disease.

New online resource brings science outreach to a broader audience

With the launch of a new website, RockEDU Online, more resources are now available for learners, educators, and scientists everywhere.

New findings could make mosquitoes more satisfied—and safer to be around

Scientists have learned new tricks that could be useful in preventing mosquito-borne illnesses such as Zika and yellow fever. A new study shows that some appetite-reducing drugs can curtail the insects’ impulse to feed on warm-blooded hosts.

Lysin therapy offers new hope for fighting drug-resistant bacteria

Increasingly, bacteria do not succumb to antibiotics. Rockefeller researchers have developed a new class of antimicrobial drug, lysin, with one compound showing promising results in a clinical trial—suggesting that an alternative to antibiotics may be on the horizon.

Daniel Kronauer discusses “The Social Lives of Ants” at this year’s Talking science event

More than 350 high school students from across the tri-state area attended this year’s event where Kronauer shared how ants can help answer questions about the principles that govern life.

An end in sight 

Medical science is holding its breath. For decades, the most it could do for people with HIV was to prevent them from dying of AIDS. Now, new therapies are raising hopes for something more: a world in which the virus will no longer cause suffering or fear.

>

In simple bacteria, scientists find new evidence of complex immunity

Bacteria use a multifaceted immune response to get rid of invading DNA. In a new study, researchers identify an enzyme that can destroy foreign genetic material capable of evading a microbe’s first line of defense.

Recent Awards and Honors

Laura Duvall Portrait

Laura Duvall receives Blavatnik Regional Award

September 4, 2019

Duvall, a research associate in the lab of Leslie B. Vosshall, is honored for her investigation of the mechanisms by which neuropeptides modulate mosquito behavior.

Carla Nasca and Liling Wan named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalists

September 4, 2019

Nasca, from Bruce S. McEwen’s lab, and Wan, from C. David Allis’ lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work in the life sciences category.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Washington Post

A mathematical constant that is one of the keystones of chaos theory has been named for him: the Feigenbaum constant. It was revealed as part of his discovery of a powerful and detailed mathematical description of precisely how in a wide array of seemingly disparate systems, order breaks down and makes the transition to chaos.

NPR

"I really feel like I'm looking at one of the most mysterious aspect of our own existence," Brivanlou says. Brivanlou, Simunovic and their colleagues hope their creations will lead to fundamental discoveries that could have many implications, including a better understanding of the the origins of many diseases.

The New York Times

“It’s tempting to think marijuana is a harmless substance that poses no threat to teens and young adults. The medical facts, however, reveal a different reality.” —Mary Jeanne Kreek in an op-ed for The New York Times

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

Instagram


Subscribe to Rockefeller Science News

Did you know Rockefeller has a monthly science newsletter? Subscribe now to stay on top of the latest discoveries, news updates, and science highlights from Rockefeller’s laboratories and researchers.