Skip to main content
!
Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
>

Paul Muller wins 2020 Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Muller receives the honor for his examination of the interactions between neurons in the intestinal tract, known as enteric neurons, and intestinal macrophages, a kind of immune cell.

Rockefeller gets a new, more efficient boiler

With the aid of a mobile crane and a crew of around 20, a fully assembled Cleaver Brooks Fire Tube boiler was delivered into the university’s Power House. This winter, after months of work to plumb, wire, and test the machine, it was lit for the first time and began providing heat to Rockefeller buildings.

When zombies take over the brain 

Research on Parkinson’s has taken a surprising twist. A group of neurons long assumed to expire in the disease were recently found to not be dead after all—providing a possible explanation for how the condition worsens.

Rockefeller grants commercial license for the development of new HIV drugs

The novel compounds are based on so-called broadly neutralizing antibodies, molecules that make rare people's immune systems capable of fighting HIV. They could potentially yield new treatment and prevention approaches benefitting people around the world, including in developing countries.

The Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute renews partnerships with Takeda and Bridge Medicines

The renewal allows Rockefeller faculty to continue transforming their discoveries into new medicines.

>

Neuron-like activity detected in an unforeseen place

Scientists have identified a particular type of skin cell that looks and behaves similar to a nerve cell, prompting new questions about the body's biggest organ.

New BSL-3 lab to advance research on pathogens

Rockefeller researchers studying the tuberculosis bacterium now have access to a state-of-the-art biosafety level 3 laboratory on campus. The new facility is one of only a small handful in New York City.

Becoming a Scientist: Jasmine Nirody 

She’s the physicist whose love of locomotion became a research topic, and a career.

>

Kivanç Birsoy receives 2020 Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise

Birsoy is honored for his research examining how metabolic pathways regulate biological processes and contribute to disease.

Rockefeller joins tri-institutional Ph.D. program in computational biology

Data analysis is becoming increasingly important in all fields of science. In joining the program, Rockefeller will connect with a stream of talented students focused on computational problems.

Recent Awards and Honors

LLuciano Marraffini portrait

Luciano Marraffini awarded Max Planck-Humboldt Medal

October 14, 2020

Marraffini receives the award for his achievements studying CRISPR-Cas, a bacterial immune mechanism whose discovery led to modern gene-editing tools.

Amelia Escolano and Marc Schneeberger Pané named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalists

September 23, 2020

Escolano, from Michel C. Nussenzweig’s lab, and Schneeberger Pané, from Jeffrey M. Friedman’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work in the life sciences category.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

CNN

"The vast majority of antibiotics we use today come from growing bacteria out of soil," said Sean Brady, a chemical biologist and professor at The Rockefeller University in New York City. Though we came up with ways to make them ourselves, it was in dirt that these antibiotics were first discovered.

NIH Director's Blog

Two studies from Jean-Laurent Casanova suggest that one reason some otherwise healthy people become gravely ill may be previously unknown trouble spots in their immune systems, which hamper their ability to fight the virus.

The Washington Post

“We’re all a few in a cast of thousands,” Charles Rice said. “I feel a little bit odd — a combination of humbled and embarrassed. I think there are many people who should feel very good about what they contributed today.”

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


Subscribe to Rockefeller Science News

Did you know Rockefeller has a monthly science newsletter? Subscribe now to stay on top of the latest discoveries, news updates, and science highlights from Rockefeller’s laboratories and researchers.