Skip to main content
!
Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.
>

Study explores genetic differences among people’s gut microbes, and their health consequences

Scientists have found that small genetic differences can cause the same gut microbe to behave differently in different people, and affect the overall health of their human hosts.

Research on repetitive worm behavior may have implications for understanding human disease

Studying microscopic worms, Rockefeller scientists have identified a brain circuit that drives repetitive behavior—providing potential clues for understanding some human psychiatric conditions.

>

Jue Chen and Luciano Marraffini elected to National Academy of Sciences

Election to the National Academy of Sciences is one of the most prestigious honors a scientist can receive; including Chen and Marraffini, the number of current Rockefeller scientists who are members of the elite organization stands at 38, or nearly half the faculty.

Drugs from dirt 

Therapeutics has gone underground. From one bag of soil, chemists can now procure millions of microbial molecules. Any one could be tomorrow’s lifesaving medicine.

Study pinpoints what causes relapse after cancer immunotherapy

In many cancer patients who have been treated with immunotherapy, the tumor comes back. New research identifies the cells responsible for thwarting the treatment and offers new insights into how they do it.

>

Gene-editing technique opens door for HIV vaccine

Researchers successfully modified immune cells to produce antibodies that fight HIV. This strategy could eventually be used to develop a vaccine against the virus, among other conditions.

Rockefeller creativity on display at the 21st annual employee art show

This year’s show featured portraiture, travel photography, collage, and other mediums.

Celebrating and remembering Paul Greengard, a pioneering neuroscientist and Nobel laureate

Greengard revolutionized our understanding of how brain cells communicate with each other and contributed to major advances in the treatment of a wide range of neurological and psychiatric diseases. He died April 13 at the age of 93.

New microscopy technique peers deep into the brain

Using new imaging technology, researchers can now record the activity of large populations of brain cells with unprecedented speed, and at new depths.

New hope for treating a childhood brain cancer

Recent research has shown that a drug known as MI-2 can kill cells that cause a fatal brain cancer. But only now have scientists been able to explain how the compound works: by targeting cholesterol production in tumors.

Recent Awards and Honors

LLuciano Marraffini portrait

Luciano Marraffini awarded Max Planck-Humboldt Medal

October 14, 2020

Marraffini receives the award for his achievements studying CRISPR-Cas, a bacterial immune mechanism whose discovery led to modern gene-editing tools.

Amelia Escolano and Marc Schneeberger Pané named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalists

September 23, 2020

Escolano, from Michel C. Nussenzweig’s lab, and Schneeberger Pané, from Jeffrey M. Friedman’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work in the life sciences category.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

CNN

"The vast majority of antibiotics we use today come from growing bacteria out of soil," said Sean Brady, a chemical biologist and professor at The Rockefeller University in New York City. Though we came up with ways to make them ourselves, it was in dirt that these antibiotics were first discovered.

NIH Director's Blog

Two studies from Jean-Laurent Casanova suggest that one reason some otherwise healthy people become gravely ill may be previously unknown trouble spots in their immune systems, which hamper their ability to fight the virus.

The Washington Post

“We’re all a few in a cast of thousands,” Charles Rice said. “I feel a little bit odd — a combination of humbled and embarrassed. I think there are many people who should feel very good about what they contributed today.”

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


Subscribe to Rockefeller Science News

Did you know Rockefeller has a monthly science newsletter? Subscribe now to stay on top of the latest discoveries, news updates, and science highlights from Rockefeller’s laboratories and researchers.