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Newly discovered brain network offers clues to social cognition

By studying rhesus monkeys, researchers have identified a brain network dedicated to processing social interactions—a discovery that offers tantalizing clues to the origins of our ability to understand what other people are thinking.

Rockefeller leads global ranking of scientific impact

Rockefeller has the highest percentage of frequently cited scientific publications among more than 900 universities worldwide, according to a ranking created by the Center for Science and Technology Studies of Leiden University in The Netherlands.  

Rockefeller team makes case for federal research funding to senior White House officials

The meeting, arranged by Rockefeller Trustee Bill Ford, provided an opportunity for leading voices in the academic, biotech, and pharmaceutical sectors to make a case for sustained, robust federal support for biomedical research.

Swirling swarms of bacteria offer insights on turbulence

When bacteria swim at just the right speed, swirling vortices emerge. As those patterns disintegrate into chaos, physicists detect a telling mathematical signature.

A cell’s destiny is set earlier than expected

Stem cells in the hair follicle are organized by the cell type they will eventually become in unique compartments, at the ready to regenerate tissue.

C. David Allis wins 2017 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology

Allis has received the March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology. The award, given to investigators whose research offers hope for the prevention and treatment of birth defects and other infant diseases, honors Allis for his groundbreaking work on gene regulation.

Discovery of a Zika antibody offers hope for a vaccine

Searching for a way to thwart Zika, scientists have discovered an antibody with a potent ability to neutralize the virus.

Mary E. Hatten is elected to the National Academy of Sciences

With Hatten’s election, the Rockefeller faculty now has 39 members or foreign associates of the National Academy of Sciences.

A mechanism shared by healing wounds and growing tumors

Scientists have long seen parallels between healing wounds and growing tumors. In studying the molecular changes that occur within both, a research team has discovered a new cancer-fuelling mechanism that potentially could inform drug development.

Scientists engineer human-germ hybrid molecules to attack drug-resistant bacteria

The centromere region of chromosomes retains the same DNA from one generation to the next. Scientists have gained new insights into how it avoids being scrambled in normal cells, and how it becomes unstable in cancer.

Recent Awards and Honors

Paul Bieniasz Portrait

Paul Bieniasz winner of a 2019 Biochemical Society Award

April 4, 2018

For his research on the biology and evolution of retroviruses, including HIV-1, Bieniasz will be honored with an award from the UK’s Biochemical Society.

Marina Caskey Portrait

Team led by Marina Caskey receives a 2018 Top Ten Clinical Research Achievement Award

March 12, 2018

The award recognizes the initial results from a clinical trial of an antibody-based drug that may provide a better strategy for long-term control of HIV infection as well as a model for prevention and vaccine development.

Rockefeller in the News

CUNY TV

"What we do incredibly well is fundamental life science," says Richard Lifton. "The clarity of our mission—science for the benefit of humanity—starts from the heads of laboratories and permeates through our students and staff, and really makes Rockefeller an extraordinary place for doing biomedical science."

New York Times

"Because all diseases have a molecular basis, medical experts say, Dr. [Günter] Blobel’s achievement was a fundamental step on the road to improved health, holding out the promise of understanding the mechanisms behind cystic fibrosis, Alzheimer’s disease, leukemia, schizophrenia, the virus that causes AIDS and other immune-system deficiencies, hereditary conditions and cellular aberrations, including cancers."

Wall Street Journal

"'We extract DNA directly out of soil samples,' said biochemist Sean Brady at Rockefeller’s Laboratory for Genetically Encoded Small Molecules, a senior author on the new study. 'We put it into a bug we can grow easily in the laboratory and see if it can make new molecules—the basis of new antibiotics.'"

 

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Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.