Skip to main content

A. James Hudspeth to receive Kavli Prize in Neuroscience

Hudspeth is receiving the honor for pioneering work on the molecular and neural mechanisms of hearing.

>

Genetic mutation identified as culprit in rare infectious disease

Researchers have uncovered the genetic factors that make some people susceptible to Whipple's disease, an intestinal inflammatory disorder that causes diarrhea, pain, and weight loss.

>

New molecular views of how neurons pace their signals

Communication between cells is a carefully coordinated matter. In the brain, for example, neurons talk by firing signals at a particular tempo, each impulse subsiding before the next arises. Their pacing relies on the activity of SK channels, molecules embedded in neurons’ outer membranes. Towa...

A first look at the earliest decisions that shape a human embryo

For the first time, scientists have shown that a small cluster of cells in the human embryo dictates the fate of other embryonic cells. The discovery of this developmental “organizer” could advance research into many human diseases, and it suggests we have more in common with birds than meets the eye.

Gaby Maimon and Luciano Marraffini are named HHMI investigators

Maimon, who studies cognition and decision-making, and Marraffini, who studies the bacterial defense system CRISPR-Cas, are among 19 scientists nationwide to receive this designation.

Sohail Tavazoie promoted to professor

Sohail Tavazoie, a physician-scientist who studies the genes that regulate a tumor’s ability to metastasize, has been promoted to professor.

Rockefeller takes first place in global ranking of scientific impact

Out of over 900 universities from 55 different countries, Rockefeller tops a survey measuring the impact of university research publications, scoring the highest percentage of frequently cited scientific publications.

A new way to watch brain activity in action

A new imaging tool makes it possible to track the firing of millions of brain cells in mice while the animals move about as normal. The method could help shed new light onto the neural processes that create behavior.

Jeffrey V. Ravetch to receive 2018 Robert Koch Award

Ravetch receives the award for his groundbreaking work analyzing the immune system’s antibody response. He has worked for decades on the Fc fragment of the antibody molecule and its binding partners, known as Fc receptors.

>

New method allows scientists to study how HIV persists

Scientists have developed a new strategy to study the cells that host hidden reserves of dormant HIV, a step that may lead to new treatments that go beyond controlling the infection and instead aim to eradicate the virus entirely.

Recent Awards and Honors

Shruti Naik portrait

Shruti Naik recognized on longlist for the Nature Research Award for Inspiring Science

July 26, 2018

A former Rockefeller postdoc, Naik is recognized for her outstanding work examining how environmental stimuli collaborate with genetic factors to control immunity in the skin.

Sohail Tavazoie portrait

Sohail Tavazoie named an Emerging Leader by the National Academy Medicine

July 19, 2018

Tavazoie was selected as an Emerging Leader in Health and Medicine for his leadership qualities and cutting-edge cancer research.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

New York Times

By looking at which genes are activated in the brains of queens and workers of different ant species, Dr. [Daniel] Kronauer and his colleagues determined that a hormone called insulin-peptide 2, or ILP2, played the most important role.

Scientific American

As [A. James] Hudspeth explored the neural mechanisms of hearing over the years, he developed a special appreciation for the intricate anatomy of the inner ear—an appreciation that transcends the laboratory. “I think we as scientists tend to underemphasize the aesthetic aspect of science,” he says.

Science

"'It is mind-blowing' that cells from such evolutionarily distant species can share these developmental instructions, says Ali Brivanlou, a stem cell biologist at The Rockefeller University in New York City and a senior author on the new study. The organizer 'has been conserved evolutionarily over hundreds of millions of years, so not seeing it would have been a surprise,' he says. But, 'There is something really emotional about looking that far back at human origin.'"

 

Instagram


Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.