Skip to main content
!
Phase III Operations: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

Targeting a single protein might treat a broad range of viruses

Scientists have identified a protein that many viruses require to spread within a host—a discovery that could lead to fighting diseases as varied as parainfluenza, West Nile, and Zika with a single drug. This finding could also lead to the development of treatments for emerging viruses.

Potential new treatment for Fragile X targets one gene to affect many

Scientists found that inhibiting a regulatory protein alters the intricate signaling chemistry that is responsible for many of the disease’s symptoms. The findings provide a path to possible therapeutics for disorders associated with Fragile X.

Inflammation trains the skin to heal faster

Scientists have found that stem cells in the skin remember an injury, helping them close recurring wounds faster. The discovery could advance research and treatment of psoriasis and other inflammatory diseases.

Cori Bargmann elected to the National Academy of Medicine

Bargmann is honored for her research exploring how genes and the environment interact to generate a variety of behaviors, and how behavioral decisions are modified by context and experience.

Statistical physicist and Rockefeller Professor Emeritus E.G.D. “Eddie” Cohen dies at 94

Cohen was an emeritus faculty member at The Rockefeller University and leader in statistical physics and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. He died September 24 at the age of 94.

Gabriel Victora named 2017 MacArthur Fellow

One of the most prestigious funding programs in the world, the MacArthur fellows program awards grants to exceptionally creative individuals as an investment in their potential.

New smell test could aid early detection of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s

Problems with olfaction have been linked to a variety of health conditions. Scientists have developed new tests to detect smell loss more reliably.

Stress has dramatically different effects on male and female mouse brains

Scientists have found unexpected differences in how male and female mice respond to stress. Their findings are raising big questions about sex discrepancies in the brain and their impact on neuropsychiatric disease.

Titia de Lange to receive 2017 Rosenstiel Award

de Lange is honored for her elucidation of the mechanism of telomere protection and the maintenance of genome stability.

JoAnne Stubbe of MIT will receive the 2017 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Stubbe is being recognized for illuminating the processes that drive DNA replication and repair. Her research has led to the development of several cancer therapies.

Recent Awards and Honors

Alexander Meeske

Alexander Meeske receives Tri-Institutional Breakout Award

June 11, 2020

A postdoctoral fellow in lab of Luciano Marraffini, Meeske is honored for his research on how bacteria cope with stresses in their environment.

Albert J. Libchaber

Albert J. Libchaber named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 26, 2019

Libchaber is recognized for his contributions to the field of experimental condensed matter physics.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

NIH Director's Blog

The findings from the Nussenzweig lab help not only to understand the immune response to COVID-19, they are also critical for vaccine design, revealing what a strong neutralizing antibody for SARS-CoV-2 should look like to help the immune system win.

The Scientist

Erich Jarvis on what we can and must do to make science more equitable.

Scientific American

As drug-resistant superbugs spread, Vincent Fischetti and others are turning to microbes that kill bacteria. At a time when much of the world is besieged by a virus, it's good to know that these tiny invaders may someday save us.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


Subscribe to Rockefeller Science News

Did you know Rockefeller has a monthly science newsletter? Subscribe now to stay on top of the latest discoveries, news updates, and science highlights from Rockefeller’s laboratories and researchers.