Skip to main content
!
Phase III Operations: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

30 young scientists receive Ph.D.s at Rockefeller’s 60th convocation

Since its first convocation, Rockefeller has granted doctor of philosophy degrees in bioscience to more than 1,260 students, including today’s graduates.

Troves from a search for new biomarkers: blood-borne RNA

Scientists have found a new way to trawl blood samples for snippets of RNA released by tumors or diseased organs. The method might eventually help doctors diagnose and track a wide range of medical conditions.

William E. Ford elected Chair of The Rockefeller University Board

Ford succeeds Russell L. Carson, who is retiring after leading the Board for the past 13 years.

Rockefeller tops global university ranking in measures of research excellence and patents

The university ranks first in two major categories in a survey of more than 1600 institutions.

Drowsy worms offer new insights into the neuroscience of sleep

Scientists studying worms have discovered a group of cells that help the body transition from wakefulness to slumber.

A. James Hudspeth to receive Kavli Prize in Neuroscience

Hudspeth is receiving the honor for pioneering work on the molecular and neural mechanisms of hearing.

>

Genetic mutation identified as culprit in rare infectious disease

Researchers have uncovered the genetic factors that make some people susceptible to Whipple's disease, an intestinal inflammatory disorder that causes diarrhea, pain, and weight loss.

>

New molecular views of how neurons pace their signals

Detailed structural images reveal how an ion channel helps curtail a neuron’s firing. The work has relevance for diseases in which this molecule malfunctions.

A first look at the earliest decisions that shape a human embryo

For the first time, scientists have shown that a small cluster of cells in the human embryo dictates the fate of other embryonic cells. The discovery of this developmental “organizer” could advance research into many human diseases, and it suggests we have more in common with birds than meets the eye.

Gaby Maimon and Luciano Marraffini are named HHMI investigators

Maimon, who studies cognition and decision-making, and Marraffini, who studies the bacterial defense system CRISPR-Cas, are among 19 scientists nationwide to receive this designation.

Recent Awards and Honors

Amelia Escolano and Marc Schneeberger Pané named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalists

September 23, 2020

Escolano, from Michel C. Nussenzweig’s lab, and Schneeberger Pané, from Jeffrey M. Friedman’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work in the life sciences category.

Li Zhao portrait

Li Zhao named a Vallee Scholar

August 12, 2020

Zhao receives the honor for her research on how novel genes arise.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Wall Street Journal

“The immune system in people is as diverse as beauty, height, intelligence and any other human feature,” said molecular immunologist Michel Nussenzweig at Rockefeller University in New York. “Not everybody is the same in their ability to fight infection.”

The Guardian

Clinical use of heritable genome editing should not be considered until it's established that precise genomic changes can be made reliably without introducing undesired changes, according to a joint NAS, NAM, and Royal Society commission co-chaired by Rockefeller president Richard P. Lifton.

The Washington Post

A study from the laboratory of Leslie Vosshall, a Rockefeller University Robin Chemers Neustein professor, shows that by giving mosquitoes the minimal components of the blood meal and adding a special drug, the insects will eat and later stop biting.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


Subscribe to Rockefeller Science News

Did you know Rockefeller has a monthly science newsletter? Subscribe now to stay on top of the latest discoveries, news updates, and science highlights from Rockefeller’s laboratories and researchers.