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Embryos remember the chemicals that they encounter

A new study shows that embryonic cells retain a memory of the chemical signals to which they are exposed. Without these memories, cells fail organize into distinct tissue types.

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Enzyme structure helps to explain how protein factories are constructed

Researchers characterized the structure of Mdn1, an enzyme key to making ribosomes.

Searching in soil, scientists find a new way to combat tuberculosis

Analyzing soil samples from across the country, researchers have identified an antibiotic capable of treating strains of tuberculosis that do not respond to existing therapies.

More than 750 people visit campus during Open House New York

Rockefeller hosts historical and architectural tours as part of Open House New York, a citywide festival that puts on display buildings and spaces not usually open to the public.

This instrument will make it possible to build (almost) any other

The Precision Instrumentation Technologies facility has been outfitted with a CNC milling machine, a high-performance instrument that will help Rockefeller engineers custom-make scientific devices.

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New approach to cancer immunotherapy overcomes toxicity hurdle

Using a unique mouse model, Rockefeller scientists have developed a new strategy in cancer immunotherapy that is more safe and effective than other treatments of its kind.

To see what’s right in front of you, your brain may need some rewiring

As you encounter new experiences and form new memories, your brain changes. Now, researchers show that some of these change occur in a brain region devoted to visual perception.

Herbert Gibbs, who brightened Rockefeller’s campus for 45 years, dies at age 74

A janitor and porter, “Mister Gibbs” was known for his infectious smile and his dedication to the university community.

Rockefeller welcomes new librarian, Matthew V. Covey

Covey is bringing an inside-out approach to the library’s work, with librarians visiting scientists in their labs to help with everything from training sessions to data management.

In tiny worms, researchers find spiking neurons—and clues about brain computation

Studying neurons in C. elegans, researchers made a surprising discovery: these roundworms, like most animals, process information using a digital, electric code.

Recent Awards and Honors

Elaine Fuchs elected fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

December 11, 2018

Fuchs, Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor and head of the Robin Chemers Neustein Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development, is honored for her pioneering study of the molecular mechanisms by which skin stem cells make and repair tissues and deviate in aging and cancer.

Portrait of David C. Gadsby

David C. Gadsby named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 27, 2018

Gadsby, Patrick A. Gerschel Family Professor Emeritus, is recognized for his study of ion transport proteins in cell membranes, including the CFTR channel whose mutation causes cystic fibrosis.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The New York Times

"It was beginning to look hopeless for obese people. Then, in 1995, Dr. Jeffrey Friedman of Rockefeller University discovered what looked like the equivalent of insulin for diabetes—a molecule he called leptin that is secreted by fat cells and tells the brain how much fat the body has."

Science

"Error-free genomes from a broad sampling of vertebrates will enable researchers 'to address questions not possible to [answer] before,' adds neuroscientist Erich Jarvis of The Rockefeller University in New York City, who leads G10K."

New York Times

By looking at which genes are activated in the brains of queens and workers of different ant species, Dr. [Daniel] Kronauer and his colleagues determined that a hormone called insulin-peptide 2, or ILP2, played the most important role.

 

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Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.