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Rockefeller University biologist Michael W. Young honored with Nobel Prize for pioneering studies on circadian rhythm

Rockefeller University biologist Michael W. Young, who studies the biological clocks that regulate sleep, metabolism, and response to disease, is this year’s recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Simple strategy could lead to a “universal” flu vaccine

To keep up with evasive flu viruses, new vaccines must be developed each year. Scientists are devising a strategy to better prevent the disease without annual shots.

Infectious diseases pioneer and Rockefeller Professor Emeritus John Zabriskie dies at 88

Zabriskie was a leader in the investigation of streptococcal infections and their long-term side effects, including rheumatic fever and autoimmune disorders. He died August 17 at the age of 88.

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In brief: Alternative CRISPR system is less specific, more robust

Scientists found that a system called CRISPR-Cas10 can target rapidly mutating viruses.

Gut bacteria that “talk” to human cells may lead to new treatments

Scientists developed a method to genetically engineer gut bacteria to produce molecules that have the potential to treat certain disorders by altering human metabolism.

Albany Medical Center Prize awarded to Luciano Marraffini

The prestigious award honors Marraffini and four other scientists for development of the revolutionary genome-editing system known as CRISPR-Cas9.

How the brain recognizes familiar faces

Scientists have located two areas in the brain that help us recognize familiar faces. The discovery will help them delve deeper into the relationship between face recognition, memory, and social knowledge.

First mutant ants shed light on evolution of social behavior

Scientists disrupted a gene essential for sensing pheromones, resulting in severe deficiencies in the ants’ social behaviors and their ability to survive within a colony.

Rockefeller is a leading institution in Nature Index ranking of innovation

The ranking evaluates how research articles are cited in patents, showing the influence of research on the development of products and services.

Hunger-controlling brain cells may offer path for new obesity drugs

Within the oldest part of the brain, scientists have found cells in charge of controlling appetite and eating. The discovery could revitalize efforts to develop drugs for obesity that make us less hungry.

Recent Awards and Honors

Gabriel Victora

Gabriel D. Victora named a 2019 Pew-Stewart Scholar for Cancer Research

June 14, 2019

Victora receives the award for work characterizing the dynamic interactions between different immune cell types as cancers develop.

Laura Duvall Portrait

Laura Duvall receives Tri-Institutional Breakout Award

June 12, 2019

Duvall, a research associate in lab of Leslie B. Vosshall, is honored for her investigation of the mechanisms by which neuropeptides modulate mosquito behavior.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

NPR

Orco mutants don't smell DEET and will fly toward even the most DEET-steeped human, according to Vosshall. But once they land, they immediately fly away. "Not only that, but if you look deeply into their mosquito eyes, which I do all the time, it really seems like they're really freaked out," she says. This observation suggested to the researchers that mosquitoes taste DEET upon contact, either with their mouthparts or with their feet.

The New York Times

“Everything that we do, everything we experience, can influence our physiology and change circuits in our brain in ways that make us more or less reactive to stress,” says Bruce McEwen, head of the Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology at The Rockefeller University.

The New York Times

Paul Greengard, an American neuroscientist whose quest to understand how brain cells communicate provided new insights into psychological diseases and earned him a Nobel Prize, and who used his entire $400,000 award to create an academic prize in memory of the mother he never knew, died on Saturday in Manhattan. He was 93.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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