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Günter Blobel, a Nobel laureate who redefined cell biology, has died

Günter Blobel, a Nobel Prize-winning Rockefeller biologist who discovered the mechanisms by which proteins are targeted for delivery to specific locations within cells, died February 18 at 81.

Scientists shed light on biological roots of individuality

A new study illuminates the biology that guides behavior across different stages of life in worms, and suggests how variations in specific neuromodulators in the developing nervous system may lead to occasional variations.

In brief: New molecular insights on a rare immune disorder

After figuring out the functions of two proteins involved in the rare genetic condition ICF, scientists pieced together the molecular process that is altered in the disease.

New images reveal how the ear’s sensory hairs take shape

Our ability to hear relies on tiny bundles of hair-like sensors inside the inner ear. Scientists have identified a key component of the machinery that makes these bundles grow in an orderly fashion.

New tool for tracking “kiss-and-run” communication between cells could advance research in multiple fields

Virtually all aspects of life and disease depend of brief exchanges between cells. A new technique to study cell-to-cell contacts lets interacting cells “smear” one another with the biological equivalent of lipstick.

Uncovering the early origins of Huntington’s disease

The symptoms of Huntington’s typically appear in middle age, but the disease may in fact originate much earlier. New research shows that a patient’s neural abnormalities may arise already during embryonic development—suggesting that treating the disease early may be beneficial.

New immunotherapy approach boosts body’s ability to destroy cancer cells

A new treatment may help cancer patients who don't respond to traditional immunotherapy. Findings from the first-ever clinical trial reveal that it is effective in activating immune cells that kill cancer cells.

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In brief: Variation between strains may account for differences in people’s vulnerability to infection

New research shows that subtle differences between bacterial strains may cause dramatic differences in outcome between people infected with the same microbe.

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In brief: How the immune system curbs its own mistakes

Researchers discovered how apoptosis keeps potential cancer-causing mutations in check.

Proof of principle: Tri-I TDI drug candidates “graduate” to next phase of development

As inaugural Sanders Director Dr. Michael Foley is set to depart the Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute later this year, two projects from a portfolio of 57 that the Tri-I TDI has supported are now ready for the next phase of therapeutic development—a phase intended to lead to investigational new drugs.

Recent Awards and Honors

Gregory P. Donaldson portrait

Gregory P. Donaldson named Damon Runyon Fellow

January 29, 2019

Gregory P. Donaldson, a postdoctoral fellow in Daniel Mucida’s lab, was given the award for his research investigating how bacteria in the gut may influence tumor growth.

Portrait of Elaine Fuchs

Elaine Fuchs elected fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

December 11, 2018

Fuchs, Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor and head of the Robin Chemers Neustein Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development, is honored for her pioneering study of the molecular mechanisms by which skin stem cells make and repair tissues and deviate in aging and cancer.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Nature Video

"We as humans are highly social and so much of our life revolves around communication. And then you see these tiny critters on the floor and you see that they also communicate--the follow each other, and they seem to coordinate their actions. Immediately, you start to feel some kind of connection to these guys." -Daniel Kronauer

The Atlantic

"'The whole thing started off as a joke,' says Leslie Vosshall, who led the study. 'The assumption was that the human drugs would kill the animal or have no effect. It was a stupid thing.' So imagine her surprise when it worked."

The New York Times

"Dr. Nirody, who will start research at Rockefeller University this coming year, and Judy Jinn, were graduate students in the lab of Robert J. Full at the University of California, Berkeley, when they decided to subject the geckos’ water running to greater scrutiny. They built a tank, acquired some house geckos and used video to document the geckos’ water running in a controlled environment so that it could be mathematically analyzed."

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue includes a deep dive into the science that could finally end HIV; a conversation with neuroscientist Cori Bargmann about the brain’s intrinsic nature; and a lot more.


From this issue

 

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Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.