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Rockefeller University biologist Michael W. Young honored with Nobel Prize for pioneering studies on circadian rhythm

Rockefeller University biologist Michael W. Young, who studies the biological clocks that regulate sleep, metabolism, and response to disease, is this year’s recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Simple strategy could lead to a “universal” flu vaccine

To keep up with evasive flu viruses, new vaccines must be developed each year. Scientists are devising a strategy to better prevent the disease without annual shots.

Infectious diseases pioneer and Rockefeller Professor Emeritus John Zabriskie dies at 88

Zabriskie was a leader in the investigation of streptococcal infections and their long-term side effects, including rheumatic fever and autoimmune disorders. He died August 17 at the age of 88.

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In brief: Alternative CRISPR system is less specific, more robust

Scientists found that a system called CRISPR-Cas10 can target rapidly mutating viruses.

Gut bacteria that “talk” to human cells may lead to new treatments

Scientists developed a method to genetically engineer gut bacteria to produce molecules that have the potential to treat certain disorders by altering human metabolism.

Albany Medical Center Prize awarded to Luciano Marraffini

The prestigious award honors Marraffini and four other scientists for development of the revolutionary genome-editing system known as CRISPR-Cas9.

How the brain recognizes familiar faces

Scientists have located two areas in the brain that help us recognize familiar faces. The discovery will help them delve deeper into the relationship between face recognition, memory, and social knowledge.

First mutant ants shed light on evolution of social behavior

Scientists disrupted a gene essential for sensing pheromones, resulting in severe deficiencies in the ants’ social behaviors and their ability to survive within a colony.

Rockefeller is a leading institution in Nature Index ranking of innovation

The ranking evaluates how research articles are cited in patents, showing the influence of research on the development of products and services.

Hunger-controlling brain cells may offer path for new obesity drugs

Within the oldest part of the brain, scientists have found cells in charge of controlling appetite and eating. The discovery could revitalize efforts to develop drugs for obesity that make us less hungry.

Recent Awards and Honors

Gabriel Victora named recipient of an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award

Gabriel Victora named recipient of an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award

October 2, 2018

Victora, head of the Laboratory of Lymphocyte Dynamics, received this grant to expand his novel method that makes it possible to monitor physical interactions between cells.

hixin Liu and Jeremy Rock have each received NIH Director’s New Innovator Awards

Shixin Liu and Jeremy Rock have each received NIH Director’s New Innovator Awards

October 2, 2018

Liu, head of the Laboratory of Nanoscale Biophysics and Biochemistry, and Rock, head of the Laboratory of Host-Pathogen Biology, received grants that are part of the NIH’s High-Risk, High-Reward Research Program.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Science

"Error-free genomes from a broad sampling of vertebrates will enable researchers 'to address questions not possible to [answer] before,' adds neuroscientist Erich Jarvis of The Rockefeller University in New York City, who leads G10K."

New York Times

By looking at which genes are activated in the brains of queens and workers of different ant species, Dr. [Daniel] Kronauer and his colleagues determined that a hormone called insulin-peptide 2, or ILP2, played the most important role.

Scientific American

As [A. James] Hudspeth explored the neural mechanisms of hearing over the years, he developed a special appreciation for the intricate anatomy of the inner ear—an appreciation that transcends the laboratory. “I think we as scientists tend to underemphasize the aesthetic aspect of science,” he says.

 

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Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.