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Jennifer Doudna to receive the 2018 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Doudna, a pioneer in the study of RNA, will be given the prize during a ceremony on the Rockefeller campus on Tuesday, October 2.

C. David Allis wins 2018 Lasker Award for discovery of new mechanisms regulating gene expression

Allis receives the nation's top science award for research on epigenetic gene regulation and its role in disease.

New campus caterer to focus on fresh food, variety, and sustainability

Committed to innovative cuisine, Great Performances will be introducing changes over the next weeks and months as they get to know Rockefeller tastes and culture.

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New gene-engineering technique will help scientists study the immune system

Using gene editing technology, researchers have developed a new way to study B cell activation in mice. This technique makes research more efficient, and has the potential to improve our understanding of immune responses in humans.

Third Rockefeller cryo-EM to help tame poorly behaved proteins

With a new transmission cryo-electron microscope, Rockefeller researchers will be prepared to sleuth out complicated protein structures in increasingly sophisticated ways.

Ant-y social: study of clonal raider ants reveals the evolutionary benefits of group living

A new study in ants demonstrates that living in groups leads to improved fitness. The researchers show that, in larger groups, ants take on specialized roles and colony stability increases.

New faculty member studies the architecture of the genome

Risca explores the three-dimensional structures that organize and support DNA, and the biochemical rules that govern the organization of the genome. She will join Rockefeller as an assistant professor on January 2, 2019.

Structure of ion channel reveals how insects smell their way around the world

Researchers describe, for the first time, the structure of a smell-receptor protein common among insects. Its inner architecture illuminates how insects evolved to detect an amazing diversity of odors.

Researchers uncover molecular mechanisms of rare skin disease

Scientists describe a group of proteins that protect cells from a subtype of human papilloma virus. They also outline genetic mutations that make this virus unusually harmful in people with epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a rare skin condition.

Lack of a single molecule may indicate severe and treatment-resistant depression

Researchers find that a deficiency of acetyl-L-carnitine is associated with a particular subtype of depression. Individuals with very low levels of this molecule often have highly severe symptoms and don’t respond to traditional antidepressants.

Recent Awards and Honors

Samantha Larsen

Samantha Larsen receives Regeneron Prize for Creative Innovation

July 18, 2019

Larsen is honored for her graduate work investigating inflammatory memory in the lab of Elaine Fuchs.

Priya Rajasethupathy

Priya Rajasethupathy to receive Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

July 2, 2019

Rajasethupathy is honored for her investigation of memory and related cognitive processes.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Washington Post

A mathematical constant that is one of the keystones of chaos theory has been named for him: the Feigenbaum constant. It was revealed as part of his discovery of a powerful and detailed mathematical description of precisely how in a wide array of seemingly disparate systems, order breaks down and makes the transition to chaos.

NPR

"I really feel like I'm looking at one of the most mysterious aspect of our own existence," Brivanlou says. Brivanlou, Simunovic and their colleagues hope their creations will lead to fundamental discoveries that could have many implications, including a better understanding of the the origins of many diseases.

The New York Times

“It’s tempting to think marijuana is a harmless substance that poses no threat to teens and young adults. The medical facts, however, reveal a different reality.” —Mary Jeanne Kreek in an op-ed for The New York Times

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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