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New study resolves the structure of the human protein that causes cystic fibrosis

In order to better understand how genetic mutations give rise to cystic fibrosis, researchers need to map the protein responsible for the disorder. The new structure has led to new insights on how this molecular channel functions.

Changes in the vascular system may trigger Alzheimer’s disease

In some people whose cognitive functions are weakened due to Alzheimer’s, the disease can be traced back to changes in the brain’s blood vasculature. Scientists have found that a protein involved in blood clotting and inflammation might offer a potential path to new drugs.

David Rockefeller, university benefactor for 76 years, dies at 101

"David's integrity, strength, wisdom, and judgment—and especially his unequivocal commitment to excellence—shaped the University and made it the powerhouse of biomedical discovery it is today," said Russell L. Carson, chair of the Board, and Richard P. Lifton, president, in a statement.

For biologists studying tiny worms, new technologies make big improvements

Two new technologies are helping scientists understand new aspects of organ and nervous system development in C. elegans. One allows them to image worms developing in a natural environment, while the other makes it possible to track single neurons as the worms grow.

Early intervention with new treatment provides durable control of HIV-like virus in monkeys

There are more than 25 drugs to control HIV, yet the virus remains one of the world’s biggest health problems. One of the many challenges with existing therapies is that a dormant version of the virus is always lurking in the background, ready to attack the immune system as soon as treatment is in...

A new way to reset gene expression in cancer cells shows promise for leukemia treatment

New findings from Rockefeller University researchers could guide the development of potent combination therapies that deliver more effective and durable treatment of leukemia. In recent work published in Nature, they show it’s possible to deactivate cellular programs involved in tumor growth by di...

Study tests the “three-hit” theory of autism

 Since the first case was documented in the United States in 1938, the causes of autism have remained elusive. Hundreds of genes, as well as environmental exposures, have been implicated in these brain disorders. Sex also seems to have something to do with it: About 80 percent of children diagnosed...

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Raphael Cohn wins 2017 Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Raphael Cohn, a graduate fellow in Vanessa Ruta’s Laboratory of Neurophysiology and Behavior, is a recipient of this year’s Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award, one of the country’s most prestigious graduate student prizes in the biosciences. The award, given by the Fred Hutchinson Canc...

Paul Greengard Professorship established with $5 million gift from the Fisher Center Foundation

Late last year, guests at the President’s House raised a glass in celebration of one of Rockefeller’s most beloved colleagues. In his nearly 35 years at Rockefeller, Paul Greengard has led pioneering studies that have transformed our understanding of how the nervous system works, and have paved ...

New structural studies reveal workings of a molecular pump that ejects cancer drugs

Sometimes cells resist medication by spitting it back out. Cancer cells, in particular, have a reputation for defiantly expelling the chemotherapy drugs meant to kill them. Researchers at The Rockefeller University have shed new light on a molecular pump that makes this possible, by determining its ...

Recent Awards and Honors

Paul Bieniasz Portrait

Paul Bieniasz winner of a 2019 Biochemical Society Award

April 4, 2018

For his research on the biology and evolution of retroviruses, including HIV-1, Bieniasz will be honored with an award from the UK’s Biochemical Society.

Marina Caskey Portrait

Team led by Marina Caskey receives a 2018 Top Ten Clinical Research Achievement Award

March 12, 2018

The award recognizes the initial results from a clinical trial of an antibody-based drug that may provide a better strategy for long-term control of HIV infection as well as a model for prevention and vaccine development.

Rockefeller in the News

CUNY TV

"What we do incredibly well is fundamental life science," says Richard Lifton. "The clarity of our mission—science for the benefit of humanity—starts from the heads of laboratories and permeates through our students and staff, and really makes Rockefeller an extraordinary place for doing biomedical science."

New York Times

"Because all diseases have a molecular basis, medical experts say, Dr. [Günter] Blobel’s achievement was a fundamental step on the road to improved health, holding out the promise of understanding the mechanisms behind cystic fibrosis, Alzheimer’s disease, leukemia, schizophrenia, the virus that causes AIDS and other immune-system deficiencies, hereditary conditions and cellular aberrations, including cancers."

Wall Street Journal

"'We extract DNA directly out of soil samples,' said biochemist Sean Brady at Rockefeller’s Laboratory for Genetically Encoded Small Molecules, a senior author on the new study. 'We put it into a bug we can grow easily in the laboratory and see if it can make new molecules—the basis of new antibiotics.'"

 

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Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.