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Attallah Kappas, who led studies of newborn jaundice, dies at 92

Attallah Kappas, professor emeritus at The Rockefeller University and physician-in-chief emeritus at The Rockefeller University Hospital, died December 18, 2018 at the age of 92. Kappas was a leading authority in diseases related to liver function and metabolism and in the development of diagnostics and treatments for those conditions.

Study identifies genetic mutation responsible for tuberculosis vulnerability

Scientists discovered a genetic variant that greatly increases a person’s likelihood of developing tuberculosis. Their research elucidates how this mutation affects the immune system, and points to a possible treatment for people with the disease.

Year in review: 10 science stories to remember

Rockefeller researchers accomplished a lot this year. We look back at 10 of the most exciting science stories of 2018.

Caspary reverberates with the sound of the Music and Medicine Orchestra

On a recent wintry evening, over 400 people took their seats in Caspary Auditorium. Scientists were center stage, but there wasn’t any lecturing. Instead, there was music.

Rockefeller scientists tell their stories in new oral history project

Interviews with some of the university’s most prominent researchers reveal the stories behind the science, and the humans underneath the lab coats.

New strategic plan will outline university priorities over five-year term

President Rick Lifton has established a committee to guide the strategic planning process. It will be informed by presentations from administrative departments as well as input from the community at large.

Study explains how geckos gracefully gallop on water

Geckos are amazingly agile. In addition to running across land and up trees, the animals can prance across the surface of water. A new study reveals how they do it.

Seek magazine is now available online

A new digital edition makes Rockefeller’s award-winning publication available to readers everywhere.

Shape-shifting protein protects bacteria from invaders

Researchers have discovered how bacteria manage to destroy enemy DNA, while keeping their own genetic material safe.

First mapping of cells in the early human placenta to advance research on problem pregnancies

Scientists have made the first comprehensive inventory of cells present in the human placenta of the first trimester, a stage when many pregnancy complications are thought to arise. The findings could fuel new research on conditions such as preeclampsia and pre-term birth.

Recent Awards and Honors

Two Rockefeller Scientists honored with NIH Director’s Awards

October 1, 2019

Brian T. Chait and Erich D. Jarvis received the NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award for high-risk, high-reward research. Read more about the awards here.

Laura Duvall Portrait

Laura Duvall receives Blavatnik Regional Award

September 4, 2019

Duvall, a research associate in the lab of Leslie B. Vosshall, is honored for her investigation of the mechanisms by which neuropeptides modulate mosquito behavior.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

STAT News

Fortuitously, or perhaps by design, creativity has been a guiding principle for Ruta, 45, and her work. Both her parents were visual artists, and Ruta herself grew up as a ballet dancer — and at one point considered it a career path.

The Washington Post

A mathematical constant that is one of the keystones of chaos theory has been named for him: the Feigenbaum constant. It was revealed as part of his discovery of a powerful and detailed mathematical description of precisely how in a wide array of seemingly disparate systems, order breaks down and makes the transition to chaos.

NPR

"I really feel like I'm looking at one of the most mysterious aspect of our own existence," Brivanlou says. Brivanlou, Simunovic and their colleagues hope their creations will lead to fundamental discoveries that could have many implications, including a better understanding of the the origins of many diseases.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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