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Scientists caution that a rare childhood liver cancer can spread to the brain

A new report details three cases of secondary brain tumors in people with fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. The researchers say imaging tests could improve treatment for patients whose cancer spreads to the brain from the liver.

Molecular doorstop could be key to new tuberculosis drugs

In discovering how an antibiotic kills the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, scientists open the door to new treatments for the disease—and possibly others, as well.

In brief: Building the machinery that makes proteins

Scientists have used cryo-electron microscopy to capture the very first snapshots of the large ribosomal subunit—part of the ribosome responsible for forging bonds between amino acids, the building blocks of proteins—coming together.

Molecule discovered in dirt could help against multi-resistant bacteria

In mining soil for natural drugs, scientists have discovered a brand new antibiotic potent against many bacteria. They hope it could be used to treat infections that cannot be stopped with existing drugs.

In brief: Tweaking RNA protects cells from harmful inflammation

New research has helped explain what goes wrong in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome, a rare brain disorder. Patients with the disease have genetic abnormalities that may put their cells at risk of accidentally triggering an antiviral response.

In brief: Mutation explains why some people are more vulnerable to viral brain infection

Scientists identified mutations in a single gene that impair immunity to viruses in a region of the brain called the brain stem.

Günter Blobel, a Nobel laureate who redefined cell biology, has died

Günter Blobel, a Nobel Prize-winning Rockefeller biologist who discovered the mechanisms by which proteins are targeted for delivery to specific locations within cells, died February 18 at 81.

Scientists shed light on biological roots of individuality

A new study illuminates the biology that guides behavior across different stages of life in worms, and suggests how variations in specific neuromodulators in the developing nervous system may lead to occasional variations.

In brief: New molecular insights on a rare immune disorder

After figuring out the functions of two proteins involved in the rare genetic condition ICF, scientists pieced together the molecular process that is altered in the disease.

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Recent Awards and Honors

Lillian Cohn

Lillian Cohn honored with 2018 Weintraub Graduate Student Award

March 1, 2018

Given by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the Weintraub is the world’s premier award for graduate students in the biosciences. Cohn is a Ph.D. candidate in the Nussenzweig laboratory studying mechanisms of HIV-1 latency.

Li Zhao portrait

Li Zhao awarded Sloan Research Fellowship

February 15, 2018

The early-career fellowship will support her research on the origin and evolution of de novo genes, as well as their contribution to adaptive evolution, in both flies and humans.



In the Media


Günter Blobel, Nobel Laureate Who Found Cell ‘ZIP Codes,’ Dies at 81

"Because all diseases have a molecular basis, medical experts say, Dr. [Günter] Blobel’s achievement was a fundamental step on the road to improved health, holding out the promise of understanding the mechanisms behind cystic fibrosis, Alzheimer’s disease, leukemia, schizophrenia, the virus that causes AIDS and other immune-system deficiencies, hereditary conditions and cellular aberrations, including cancers."

Scientists unearth hope for new antibiotics

"'We extract DNA directly out of soil samples,' said biochemist Sean Brady at Rockefeller’s Laboratory for Genetically Encoded Small Molecules, a senior author on the new study. 'We put it into a bug we can grow easily in the laboratory and see if it can make new molecules—the basis of new antibiotics.'"

Huntington’s Disease makes its mark early on

"Using a technique for growing human embryos from stem cells in the lab, Dr. [Ali] Brivanlou discovered the mutation that causes the disease makes invisible changes much sooner than initially thought—in the earliest stages of embryonic development."

Campus news

News, notes, and announcements of particular interest to members of the Rockefeller community.

Seek magazine Fall 2017

The power of cold. [pdf]

Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs promotes and disseminates research news and other information about The Rockefeller University.