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New tool allows scientists to catch elusive protein in action

Scientists still have a lot to learn about the processes that trigger cell division, partly because they happen so quickly. A new chemical probe will make it possible to capture the workings of one of the key players.

Physician-writer Siddhartha Mukherjee will be awarded the 2019 Lewis Thomas Prize

The author of The Emperor of all Maladies, a best-selling book about cancer, will be presented with Rockefeller’s science writing award at a free, public ceremony on Rockefeller's campus next month.

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Researchers discover a common link among diverse cancer types

Some cancers have been traced to changes in histones, proteins responsible for packaging DNA and regulating genes. Now, research from Rockefeller scientists shows that, among tumors, mutations to these proteins are a lot more common than previously suspected.

The face-recognition puzzle 

For the brain, seeing a face is very different from seeing a teacup. In studying a mysterious ailment, face blindness, scientists are getting a rare glimpse into the biology of the mind.

Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center will end 23-year affiliation with Rockefeller

A move to Columbia University will provide a new home for ADARC, which for many years has occupied laboratories in a city-owned building on First Avenue.

Rockefeller reaches key milestone in River Campus project

The temporary certificate of occupancy from the New York City Department of Buildings is a close-to-last step in the expansion of the university’s campus over the FDR Drive.

David C. Gadsby, who studied electrical impulses in cells, dies

Gadsby, who passed away Saturday at age 71, was best known for his studies determining the mechanisms by which charged particles called ions move across cell membranes.

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Scientists find new clues about how the body stores fat

Scientists discovered a protein that plays a crucial role in regulating fatty acids, the molecules that make up body fat. This research could lead to new options for treating people with diseases associated with fatty acid buildup.

Scientists identify genetic factors that may cause some people to become obese

New research on leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, reveals a previously unknown mechanism that may be responsible for at least 10 percent of obesity cases. The findings could help identify individuals with treatable forms of the condition.

Inside the brains of hungry worms, researchers find clues about how they hunt

When looking for food, the roundworm C. elegans searches the same area for up to 20 minutes before trying its luck at more distant locales. New research on the worm’s brain explains how this behavior arises at the level of molecules and cells.

Recent Awards and Honors

Portrait of Elaine Fuchs

Elaine Fuchs receives AACR-G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award

March 15, 2019

Fuchs is recognized for her groundbreaking study of the molecular mechanisms by which skin stem cells make and repair tissues.

Gregory P. Donaldson portrait

Gregory P. Donaldson named Damon Runyon Fellow

January 29, 2019

Donaldson, a postdoctoral fellow in Daniel Mucida’s lab, was given the award for his research investigating how bacteria in the gut may influence tumor growth.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Discover Magazine Blogs

"Scientists at Rockefeller University claim they’ve pinpointed a protein in the ear that acts as a sort of molecular gatekeeper, helping convert soundwaves into the electrical signals that our brains interpret as sound. The finding, though incremental, helps establish a more detailed understanding of how hearing works."

Nature Video

"We as humans are highly social and so much of our life revolves around communication. And then you see these tiny critters on the floor and you see that they also communicate--they follow each other, and they seem to coordinate their actions. Immediately, you start to feel some kind of connection to these guys." -Daniel Kronauer

The Atlantic

"'The whole thing started off as a joke,' says Leslie Vosshall, who led the study. 'The assumption was that the human drugs would kill the animal or have no effect. It was a stupid thing.' So imagine her surprise when it worked."

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue includes a deep dive into the science that could finally end HIV; a conversation with neuroscientist Cori Bargmann about the brain’s intrinsic nature; and a lot more.


From this issue

 

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